16 thoughts on “St Johns church, Lucan Street, Stockton c1965

  1. Stuart,
    No1 Lucan Street was on the corner of Hume Street and Lucan Street. It was indeed a fish shop and was known locally as Flynn’s fish shop. It was owned and run by Bertie Bright and his wife for years. There is a map in this site that shows the exact location.

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  2. Hello, my mum was born at 1 Lucan Street in 1926 – it was a fish and chip shop.
    She is still with us and living in Manchester, where her family moved to find work when the shipyards hit hard times (about 1930).
    I have tried to work out exactly where her birthplace was, as Lucan Street is long gone.
    Any help would be gratefully received.

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  3. That could be me walking down that back alley as I did thousands of times I was born in Lucan Street in 1949 and lived there till start of demolition, which are the back of the houses you can see in this picture, happy happy days.

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  4. I forgot to say in my last post that at the time I was collecting rabbit meat that the fields were not agricultural land but waiting for something to happen. They had already been bought for building land.

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  5. Probably just after the War I used to collect “rabbit meat”(dandelions) from the fields which is now the Ragworth Shops and the St. Johns School. I can say at that time there were no Council Houses or roads there. Around 1947-8 a person in my class at FN School moved into a house on the small Ragworth Estate (Droitwich Ave) which you entered from opposite Fewsters.

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  6. Benny is right.We moved into Dover Road on Ragworth as soon as they were built[around 1948]We had “rooms”with my grandma in Norton Avenue,so it was wonderful for my little sister and I to have a bedroom each!!!!happy days.Irene Maclean

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  7. I am 100% certain that Ragworth was totally built Post war as there were no roads into the Estate until the road I described earlier was constructed Post War. All that was over the fields where Ragworth was built were Orchards which we raided on a regular basis. Primrose Hill and Eastbourne were Pre War estates, as I think Bluehall was also,But Ragworth Never. Lustrum Beck all the way from Durham Road to Eastbourne was our playground. so I am very familiar with the area. Anon is spot on with his comments. .

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  8. The first two council houses built after the war were on Durham Road and are still there, I still have the scars on my hands to prove it. Having just started to serve my time at sixteen with Francis Browns Sheet Iron Works just after Christmas 1945 and still getting used to working after school. I was working with one of the best tradesmen Steve Small when Arthur Brown came over and told Steve to put his tool box in the car I was to go with him as a very urgent job had come up. We were taken to the houses, one a Dutch barn type later built at Fairfield and the other the type built on Roseworth. They were all fitted out apart from the sink units which would not fit in place. They were imported draining board and sink in stainless steel beautifully polished units and I had never seen anything like it before. We tried everything we knew to cut out a small section so the Plumber could fit it, the problem being stainless steel is very tough to cut. Every one was on tenterhooks as the Mayor and council were going to inspect the houses the next day, I assume to work out which they were going to build for the boys who would soon be coming home. Steve said we would have to flatten the folds so we could get a purchase with the Gilbow tin snips and did just that. We then tried a hacksaw, it did not even scratch it so snips it was. We hacked at it and tiny bits at a time managed to get the corner off that was causing the problem. Steve then caressed the bends back as they were and we polished it to every ones satisfaction, job done. Ok they said next door needs the same? My hands were sore for a week, I am sure we bent the 18 inch handles on the Gilbow snips in our efforts and I for one never forgot it. Each time I pass down Durham Road and see those houses I remember my sore hands. Steve passed away a long while back but I learned from him patience and perseverence work in the end. Frank.

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  9. Benny is forgetting Daventry Ave, Droitwich Ave and Deal Close. They were pre war and I think some of the second phase of council housing built in Stockton. That is also Ragworth. Frank.

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  10. “Little” Ragworth Estate, Daventry,Droitwich, Deal Dunstable,Dorchester, were all built post-war, in around 1947-48, as I think was “big” Ragworth, Dumbarton,Dundee,Dover etc. The “concretes” Doncaster Crescent etc, were built in the early 1950s. I believe Lane Fox was the builder responsible for “little” Ragworth Estate.

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  11. I do not think the Ragworth Estate was pre War Robert, I remember just after the War they constructed the first road into what was to become Ragworth Estate at the top of Hawthorne road in which I lived, this would have been about 1946/47, it started at the point of the present Public House and went down over Lustrum beck and into what is now the Ragworth Estate. I was also present with my Mother at the turning of the first sod and opening Ceremony performed by Father Bott, Vicar of St Johns, Mrs Helen Bott;s Husband. Father Bott died shortly after this Ceremony I believe, which would have been about 1939. .

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  12. The back-alley shown in this photo is the rear of houses in Hume Street,the alley had a right turn at the bottom and run along the rear of Lucan Street(as shown)& Ford Place,it came out near the corner shop in Lucan Street just before you went over the Gasworks Bridge.

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  13. St Johns Church Lucan St Stockton s 1042 – During WW II a section of this school became a ‘British Restaurant’ where cheap ,wholesome meals could be purchased Beautiful clean and well kept, this school had a running battle, as the Corporation Gas-Works coal crushers and coke retorts were to the right, just out of the picture. The present St Johns School was opened on the first pre-war estate at Ragworth.

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  14. I was a parish church councillor here until my marriage (also in this church) in 1963. Despite its desperately grim exterior the inside of the church was beautifully decorated. I thought that the unidentified picture of a church choir in one of the other categories came from this church. The bricks and walls seem similar.

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