10 thoughts on “Boathouse Lane. c1985

  1. Chris hunt on January 14th 2022 – I served my apprenticeship as a plater at F.Wilkinson at end of Boathouse Lane, Thornaby between 1972 – 1976 made friends I still have now. Happy days.

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  2. The building on Bridge Road with the name Suite Centre was Foster Morelands. I worked at Head Wrightsons and in my 1st year of apprenticeship it was my job to go there and get screws, ironmongary etc for work being carried out in the workshop. I was always served either by a man I believed was called Robson or his son John. He was a good athlete (runner) at some Athletics Club in the area. With being an apprentice I had to buy my own tools and I always got a good discount through using this shop.

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  3. Looking at that picture top left there…if you go under that bridge and walk along the river bank about a hundred yards there used to be a stone structure like a hut.Inside the hut there was the remains of some railway tracks raised off the ground. The “hut” was about 8 foot long and 6 foot wide,obviously the remains of a larger building.Does anybody know what it was? I am DESPERATE to know ! (sorry for this repeat posting but i still haven”t found out)

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  4. I was told that my gr gr grandfather had an engineering works at Boathouse Lane in the early 1900″s, his name was Peter Harvey, but I have never been able to find any information on it. My uncle worked at Tomlinson Hall & co site many years ago and said he saw writing on the walls relating to P Harvey. If anyone can give me any information I would love to hear from you.

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  5. Looking at the top picture there…if you go under that bridge and walk along the river bank about a hundred yards there used to be a stone structure like a hut.Inside the hut there was the remains of some railway tracks raised off the ground. The “hut” was about 8 foot long and 6 foot wide,obviously the remains of a larger building.Does anybody know what it was? I am DESPERATE to know ! I used to go there with my dad in the early 70″s and it was there then…and it was STILL there in the mid 80″s when i was a teenager.What was it ? It”s always made me wonder.I remember walking there one day in the 70″s with dad and there was a sudden thunder storm and the rails were struck by lightening ! right by our feet !

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  6. Boathouse Lane –  re my comment on my apprenticeship at Imeson & Finch. Many out there will remember the awe we had when we first met our tradesman”. The Big Works such as I.C.I, Ashmore, Head-Wrightsons had training schools. With Imeson it was on the job training, although the first couple of weeks you were a “Go-for” and tool-carrier, if you held your tradesman in awe. The charge-hand and foreman were the “Untouchables” especially the foreman in his “banana-coat” and trilby. How many remember carrying their drawing-board and T-square to night school, for a report to the works was required during your apprenticeship? The firing of Imesons chimney by apprentices? It caused not only thick black smoke it interrupted a session of Thornaby Council in the Town Hall and the evacuation of the factory as the fire-brigade deemed the heat dangerous to the structure, never the less it stood another 30years They never did find the culprit(s)

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  7. My Grandfather Harry Fisher worked at Imeson & Finch until he retired shortly after the end of WW2. He cycled every day to and from his home in Yarm and I am told he was never late for work. Although he could have used the No.2 bus to travel to Stockton from Yarm he would have considered the expense ludicrous. He was very canny with his money and cobbled his own and all the family`s footwear. They don`t make `em like that anymore.

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  8. Boat House Lane I served my engineering apprenticeship at Messers Imeson & Finch, who had two factories alongside the River Tees, one was behind the Labour Exchange in Bridge Road, there was also a ex R.N Motor torpedo boat anchored at the nearby jetty, which was sunk when a high tide fouled the anchoring ropes and turned the boat over. The other factory in the ex Generating House of the Imperial Tramway Company in Boathouse Lane , behind the present S.D.S furniture shop. This was a war time measure and an all women work force turned out thousands of bombs and shell fuse cases and coal mining equipment. Only a few men were employed for maintenence and those of us who”d led a sheltered life , soon “grew-up”. The 60 ft chimney was still in place (felled in the 1980s) and a day of panic occured when a group of apprentices placed dozens of worn tyres, empty oil drums and timber inside the base , firing them and covering Thornaby with thick black smoke. The river bank was unusual some of the retaining walls being molten glass block from a once glass-factory on the site.

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  9. Forster-Brothertons, sawmillers and joinery manufactures were in Boathouse Lane and were a sizeable employer. I have a feeling that the third picture down is the factory building. Can any former staff confirm this? My best man, Jack Iceton served his apprenticeship there and returned for a few years after National Service in Singapore.I first met Jack at the Technical college on the same course.

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