Ashmore, Benson, Pease & Company Ltd

Ashmore-Benson & Pease on Bowesfield Lane in Stockton. The company started in the year 1876 when two local men Mr William Ashmore and his brother-in-law, Mr S While, built the Hope Iron Works in Parkfield for the construction of boilers, gas-holders and bridges.

In 1883 Mr R.S. Benson joined the business and he was joined shortly afterward by Mr E L Pease who was with the company until his death in 1934. Amongst the companys early development in gas engineering was the invention by Mr E L Pease in 1888 of a telescopic gas-holder, which was then a great advancement on the orthodox type of structure.

16 thoughts on “Ashmore, Benson, Pease & Company Ltd

  1. I have a metal plague with ABP Ashmore Benson Pease on it that I have had for many years I have no idea how I came across it but it is oval in shape and maybe brass and some other metal. It has intrigued me for years. I only live about 10 miles from stockton and have been fascinated by local history. I have never thrown it or given it away for some reason – weird. Thanks for all of the information.

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    • Maria – I have two of those plates. One is brass and the other appears to be aluminium. My relative was William Ashmore.

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  2. It was amazing to see and read these comments. My late mum was born in Adam Street in 1911, and my Grandma Barker and more of our family lived there. Gran eventualy went blind and I can remember us kids going to the pub on the corner to get a jug of beer for her. She lived there until she passed away in the 1960s

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  3. I can oblige with a photo of a WW1 On War Service badge issued by ABP Ltd, Parkfield Works.
    Many firms issued these to stop their workers from being accused of ‘slacking’ or avoiding miltary service. My example is dated 1915 and the bulk of them are from 1914 or 1915. When conscription came in in 1916, the wearing of these badges declined considerably.

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    • I believe my granddad worked at parkfield works at some point , he also won the military cross in 1917. His name was Albert George Victor Jeynes, his father was Albert Jeynes and was an iron founder with a person called Smithers (Smithers and Jeynes Ltd). I have pictures of the works with the plaque Smithers and Jeynes on it and have records of garden parties in which it was more a sort of afternoon concert hosted by the Ashmores and the invites of who would be there, my great grandfather was part of the Masons in Stockton I believe and when he was killed it was front page news in the Stockton and Darlington News.
      I’m trying to find out more so any help would be greatly received, please ask Picture Stockton for my email.

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  4. I too have all three copies of the books you mention. They belonged to my wife’s father, George Elliot Newell, who worked there for many years. He appears to have dated them on receipt as:-
    Stockton on Tees – December 1950.
    The Stockton Scene – 1951.
    Stockton Today – December 1953.

    I assume they were a ‘corporate gift’ at the time.

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  5. In answer to Ian Devereux about the books that were produced by Power Gas Corporation, I have got two of the books in my posession which were handed down to me by my grandfather who worked there, I also worked there from 1956-1960. But getting back to the books, the first one being called ‘The Market Cross’, inside the cover my grandfather has written the date of 1950.

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  6. In fact there were three books produced by The Power Gas Corporation, one being Stockton on Tees, which incorporates pen and ink sketches of Stockton but unfortunately I don’t know the date. The second is Stockton Today printed in 1953 which shows views in and around Stockton. The third book, The Stockton Scene, is a series of paintings by Alex Wright of Stokesly showing views of Stokton and beyond including Barnard Castle and Robin Hoods Bay. This book is also undated but I would estimate it was produced in the mid 50’s early 60’s. All three books are in my possession.

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  7. I have come across a book called The Stockton Scene presented to a Reg Cole, I think, by the power-gas corporation ltd and Ashmore Benson Pease and company. It contains photos of the town hal, market day and 17 other photos – anyone heard of this book?

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  8. Hello John Jr, I am your cousin – your Mother Edie is my aunt. I remember you all, I now live in Derbyshire but remember Stockton well. We used to live in ADAM ST we exchanged Aunt JESSIE’S house in PRINCESS STREET in 1943. Hope you and all are well.

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  9. I was born in 2 Adam street in 1959 my mum is Edith my dad was John he worked at Ashmores he used drink in the pub opposite our house.I have no pictures but I have good memories of Bowesfeild Lane school, when me and two brothers and three sisters walked to school each day come rain or shine

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  10. I was born in 1939 my mothers house was on Adam street at the far end of Bowesfield Lane Stockton-on-tees does anyone have pics of that area? It was only one street and one terrace of houses called Teesbridge, there was Ashmore Benson Iron foundries and further along the road was a large brick works further on up the road was a concrete works. At the top of the street was a pub where everyone went that liked a good pint of beer after work. This was a thriving community, I can remember every one that used to live there. There was a TNT works that was where my dad worked for a few years till he lost an eye.

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    • My cousin’s great grandmother ran the Tees Bridge Hotel until 1906. He says he was born across from the foundry. Sounds like this may be the place

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