98 thoughts on “Grangefield Grammar School (Boys)1954

    • Hi Sue, I have looked through the Grangefield School magazine “The Stocktonian” for any mention of your father. He joined the Stocktonian Association in 1951 and maintained his membership until 1956, when I presume that he moved on. The annual year book lists any changes in staff at the school, but there is no record of the arrival or departure of your father. You can look through old copies of The Stocktonian on-line at
      https://heritage.stockton.gov.uk/resources/the-stocktonian/

      Like

    • He was my form master and maths teacher in some of the years in the mid 50s. He was a very fair teacher and quite strict but I remember that he commanded respect from my form. For some unknown reason we thought his name sounded vaguely German so we nicknamed him Baron Von Stockill which I am sure he never knew. Ifyou trawl through Grangefied Grammar School posts you will find a picture of him with our form. I am sat on his right.

      Like

    • Hi Sue… I remember your father, absolutely and very fondly. Of all the teachers during the years 1949-1954 he was my favourite and my favourite subject was maths, because of your father, he taught maths in such an understandable way (certainly to me anyway) and he was also influential in determining my future. Maths was the basis of what decided as a career…. Electrical Engineering. I am now well retired but will not forget your fathers influence on my life after Grangefield!

      Like

    • Hi Sue,…I’ve tried sending this message previously, without success, unless it has been delayed whereby it may be repeated!

      During my period at Grangefield (and one year at Nelson Terrace)..1949-1954, in my opinion I thought your dad was the best teacher at the school.He was great at teaching me maths to the point I actually loved it.He seemed to explain the subject in such a simple way!…in fact when I was coming to the end of my time at Grangefield when discussing possible future careers, my idea was to go for a career with a high maths content if possible, and I choose Electrical Engineering, influenced I believe by your dad. I have enjoyed that career all my life and I am now happily retired, but would not have wanted to change anything…..thanks to your dad…..Mr Stockill!

      Like

  1. The old Grangefield will soon be no more, replaced by the newly built Academy which opens next April. And then the demolition men will move in on the old building. They say that one of the reasons for demolition is the problem of asbestos. But I do not recall any proposals for demolishing the Houses of Parliament because of the asbestos it contains, they just increased the funds available to pay for the repairs!

    Like

  2. Hi does anyone remember Peter Robert Hingley affectionately known as ‘Hinge’. He lived in a posh detached house on Durham Road, Stockton. He was my first love when I was 16 and he was 17 and I never forgot him. We both attended Grangefield Grammar and got together on 2nd March 1962 at the Hartburn Tennis Club Saturday night dance. Ah those were the days! He was ‘in with the in crowd’ and I was so lucky that night. It’d be great to know how he is.

    Like

  3. Does any body know the whereabouts of Malcolm Ozelton he and I were big friends, he went to Grangefield form about 1954

    Like

    • Malcolm Ozelton (Ozzie) was a friend of mine, also. We were in the same year at Grangefield. He went to America, LA I think, and worked in the aerospace industry. He stayed with us for a couple of nights in the mid-nineties. I might have his address. Will look for it if you still would like it.

      Like

    • Hi my name is Joe Ozelton, Malcom Ozelton is my cousin. He is in America and has a boy & girl the girl is called Ginny and is on the net

      Like

  4. Brian Brand – a blast from the past! Yes at one stage you did attempt to teach me maths with limited success I fear. Your collagues Jim (Stirling) Stockhill & Les (Cludes You) Thornton also tried. Hopwever one report from Jim Stockhill read ‘cheerfully mystified’. Have to tell you that although I do remember the Griz sobriquet you were known in my form as Brackets. Good to hear from you and hope that you are in rude health.

    Like

  5. I’ve just read some of the banter between ‘OLD’ Grangefield Grammar School pupils. Just last Friday [Nov 11th] my wife and I attended the Remembrance Day Service in the building pictured. As one who was a pupil when we moved in to the building in June 1951 and who was present at the dedication of the 39-45 Memorial, I now travel from Alnwick to represent the Old Stocktonians’ Association. The Year 9 pupils [13 & 14 year olds] always make it a service which quietly honours our former pupils named on the memorials. Some of you may remember me as ‘Griz’ and I even tried to teach some of you Physics or Maths as well as coaching some of you in the 2nd XV. One of Stockton RFC stalwarts, Terry Wilson, contributed to an article about the club in the Journal today.

    Like

  6. I can remember G.L.Smith (Roy) standing in the school elections along with others and managing to stand up to the abuse of the crowd without turning a hair. Something that may have helped later when the ‘Denvers’ were formed. He may remember me, Brian Robinson, Keith Stevens, Carl Hanson, John Wilson (Ben) and others turning up for their debut at the old Middlesborough Empire. A night to remember with the group having to slot in between a very inept conjuror,an act with performing dogs and an MC who made Jimmy Tarbuck sound eloquent! I think that was just after Roy managed to replaced the Burns with a Fender Stratocaster, Keith and I were unconvinced,only a Gibson was good enough for Chuck Berry and back country blues fans.

    Others may also remember that they played on a number of occasions at the Hartburn Tennis Club Saturday Dance and had a singer rejoicing in the name of Johnny Rocco. Plenty of girls,a bit of underage drinking and of course no tennis.

    I can also remember Brian Humpherson playing piano in an old pub in Stockton on a Saturday night when we were all out together and being impressed with his ability to entertain all the different age groups present.

    I,like previous correspondants was sad to read about the death of Charlie Gillett. I was just in the early part of my time at Grangefield when he was about to leave but recalled him as an impressive and generous person and enjoyed seeing his television coverage years later when he was talking to famous delta blues players in New Orleans. 25/06/2011

    Like

  7. Well, Mike Crowther and Allen Callender, I can certainly tell you whose foot went through the loft space, because I was with him. His name was Peter (Wog) Atkinson. We would be in the fifth form or possibly lower sixth, so it would be about 1957/8. One or two other reprobates were there, probably Brian Leak and/or Marty Rae. None of us were prefects because of our past record of always being in the forefront of any trouble. We had discovered the entrance to the lofts above the school. It was a trapdoor located in a small storage room adjacent to the upstairs library. With the aid of a flash-light we explored these vast lofts which went the whole length of the school. There was a system of narrow, planked walkways which had to be followed, and the boy in front had the torch, but would occasionally shine it backward for the benefit of those following. Anyway, at one point Peter missed his footing in the dark and his leg went right through the plasterboard ceiling. This was at one of the highest points, above the corridor between the school hall and the art room, about thirty feet up I would say. Luckily for him he fell astride a joist otherwise he would likely have broken his neck. Well, we high-tailed out of there before the authorities had time to close off our escape, and joined the rest of the kids, gawking up at the hole, and excitedly speculating as to what had happened. Exciting times – we were never caught for that particular episode!

    Like

  8. Mike, I enjoyed your guitar playing in the art room and remember the foot through the roof incident but not the Bond Mini incident. Memory tells me that the foot was attriubuted to a prefect at the time and that his brother was in our year. Best not to put a name to him as my memory is not totally reliable these days.

    Like

  9. I have just stumbled onto this site – Grangefield Grammer School – wow! Mostly fond memories. Ken Whitfield got me started playing the guitar – I ended up playing in the Oxford University band ‘The Blue Monks’ in the late 60’s and got sent down for a year for ‘being a professional musician and studying Architecture as a hobby’. I was mates with Peter Wishlaide and John Wainwright. Does anybody remember the search for the poor lad who put his foot through the ceiling on a trip to see his girlfriend via the loft space? The gym teachers Bond Mini car 3 wheeler which ended up on a shed roof?

    Like

    • It ended up jammed in the West entrance double doors to the toilets in the covered walkway from the Gym, and belonged to Mr Banks as I recall. Just caught the rugby team pic from 53/54 with Ridley Scott front left

      Like

    • You probably won’t remember me Mike as I left GGS in 1958 when I was 14 and transferred to another grammar school in Kingston on Thames when my father changed jobs. We lived in Waltham Avenue and seem to think you lived fairly nearby, possibly Chelmsford Ave?

      Several connections to your post. I somehow became involved with Ken Whitfield’s country dance band as a drummer. He constructed a green painted wooden platform on legs containing a snare drum with a Chinese box attached. I have fond memories of a trip to the Dales in 1956/7 when we played for local dancers.

      I remember John ‘Tubby’ Wainwright too as well as lots of other boys mentioned in other posts especially those who went to Holy Trinity School. Sitting at the back of the class in Physics lessons telling dirty jokes (he mainly) whilst the Physics teacher whom we nicknamed Charlie Fred battled to keep our attention.

      Reading other entries on this site prompt the memory of losing the role of Polly Peacham in the School’s production of ‘The Beggars’ Opera when my voice broke some 3 or 4 weeks before opening night. Garth Flack took over and I had the unenviable task of taking him through aspects of the libretto. Gordon Rattenbury produced and I think Basil White was in charge of the music.

      Now 76, I am chuffed to have had those early musical experiences. I am a keen amateur jazz saxophonist in retirement as well as a bit of a singer. Got my own back at my regular visit to the Cardiff Jazz Summer School when I sang ‘Mac the Knife’ Bobby Darin style😊

      Would be great to hear from any contemporaries out there.

      Like

  10. As a result of reading the sad news of Charlie Gillet’s death today, I have just read through all the postings about Grangefield Boys, which I have never looked at before. Although I was a member of the ‘out of bounds’ school next door, a lot of the names are familiar to me, through my brothers, John and David. I was amazed to see (back in 2007) reference to Roy Smith who was a great pal of John’s and also mention of our humble folk group The Windhovers. I no longer have a copy of the record, but David has his.

    Like

  11. The BBC reported this morning (18.03.10) the sad passing of Charlie Gillett, he was a former Grangefield boy and has contributed to this article (see above). Charlie was a most well respected broadcaster and music writer. He was popular for his diverse taste in music and is credited for discovering Dire Straits and helping to win them a recording contract. I remember reading his many articles as a young man in publications like Record Mirror and The New Musical Express. At only 68 years of age he will be sadly missed.

    Like

  12. Thanks Brian. He was our table prefect (with Highland) in our first year at Grangefield. Great bloke & an even greater rugby player.

    Like

  13. Sad news about the passing of Charlie Gillett the BBC radio music presenter who passed away today (17 March 2010). He was an Old Stocktonian and had been a previous contributor to Picture Stockton.

    Like

  14. Now working at a school as a Learning mentor I realise how special my days at Grangefield were especially with Pete Hudson who made me the person I am today between 1966 and 1972

    Like

  15. I was at the school from 1960 to 1967 and I remember most of the contributors.Charlie Gillet was head boy in my first year I believe and I certainly remember Achie Foulds who might be embarrased to be reminded that he sang Kate alongside my Edith in the “Pirates of Penzance”. GeofF Crossley you were in the year above me I was never much good at rugby when I was at school but I seem to rememeber playing against you at Rosslyn Park when I left University.

    Like

  16. I was at GGS from 65 to 70 when Rupert Bradshaw was headmaster. A few of the other teachers I distinctly remember were Peter “Rock” Hudson, John “The Face” Green, “Daddy” Ken Whitfield, “Bull” Wright and “Ducks” D”Arcy. Happy days! my mates were Alan stephenson, Andrew Moore, any help?

    Like

  17. It was Form 1X not 1A. Ken Whitfield”s class at Grangefield 1959-60. I was in the same form as Geoffrey Crossley. As I recall the class register read out every morning when everybody had to reply went something like this: Appleby, Bell, Calvert, Clark, Crossley, Dick, Dinsdale, Downes etc. ….

    Like

  18. Of course you”re quite right Brian – I guess we each get out of any situation what we want and are capable of. At this time in my life I am enjoying all the above contributors to the musical and academic side of Grangefield life, and with great interest. This caused by my own new girlfriend, a professional singer who just happens to be from Tatarstan, and has introduced me to the delights of world music. Thanks for your kind comments about my dad, who died in April 1990, and was such a great influence and mentor for me.

    Like

  19. The memories of Geoff Crossley (almost a contemporary of mine) coincide with what I felt was the experience of the more academically and sportingly gifted pupils. Being neither, I hold rather different memories of the school. Games lessons, for example, seemed to consist of ritual humiliation. But I do share Geoff”s regard for Ken Whitfield and some other “masters”. Geoff”s mention of his dad, however, gives me the opportunity to say how encouraging he was when I attended the tech and it was he who set me on the road to an academic career.

    Like

  20. I thought I”d “Google” the old school. That was about 3 hours ago, and I”m still on the first entry on the list! So the old place still looks the same, eh? So many names in this thread. So comforting (at almost 61) to be reminded of them. Charlie Gillett and his rugby team were my heroes in 1959 when I first discovered the game that gave me so much enjoyment and life skills. I have made recent contact with you Charlie, and it”d still be nice to get together if possible. Archie Foulds – a direct contemporary – and due an apology from me. Sorry Archie. get in touch, if you wish, and we can get together. Nigel Mackinnon – my old cricketing buddy from Hartburn, whose bowling action (you bowled off the wrong foot), always “stumped” (forgive the pun) so many batsmen, both for the school and the cricket club across the road. I”m not the “big opening bowler partner from Billingham, but am so pleased you seemed to have enjoyed so many more enjoyable times on the cricket field, and to hear of you for the first time in 40+ yeras. And yes, I think I might just have had a soft spot for Susan Henderson too! And my dad was a mate of her dad! Ah, Grangefield Girls. Marilyn Sowler, daughter of another of my dad”s pals, and with whom I was at East Hartburn primary school, Elizabeth Hunter, excellent at absolutely everything, and Carol (lived on the corner of Norton Green) Rogers, to name but three. All fine, and very pretty examples from that production line “on the other side of that line”. And finally those masters. Ken Whitfield, another pal of my dad”s, and my form master in 1A, who taught me how to write a column of letters/numbers that wasn”t a “rat”s tail” – so important!. And funny how we all have our recollections and perceptions of “em, but Pete (Rock) Hudson, although he whacked me once for “being too big for my boots”, had such an influence on my sporting life and has, even to this day, the time to meet with me and reminisce. Thanks for the above contributions and memories to one and all. Happy Days!

    Like

  21. Brian Boddy did indeed have a Unitarian connection he used to more or less run the youth club in Wellington St Unitarian Church wich I attended, he actually taught me to dance. Harold Code also used to go there brings back memories and makes me a bit homesick, I never see any input from the females I used to know so come on girls get your memory caps on and get typing.

    Like

  22. My brother, Keith Boddy (1949-1956) went on to become Professor of Medical Physics at Newcastle, was awarded an OBE & CBE, is listed in “Who”s Who” and now lives in Hetton-le-Hole with his wife, Sylvia (nee Goodier) who is also ex-Grangefield. I, personally, was an Accountant, in the Public & Private Sectors before becoming a Lecturer in Business Studies at Stockton & Billingham Technical College. I transferred to Bournemouth & Poole College and eventually became Business Studies Division Manager. I am now very happily retired and living in Bournemouth. I,recently, had a brief reunion with Harold Code and Joe Evis (both ex-Grangefield). Joe lives in Heathfield, Sussex, and Harold lives in Dymchurch, Kent.

    Like

  23. Geoff Hutton (fabulous pianist)played in many clubs around the area. He married my cousin, Judith Betteridge, who also was at Grangefield from around 1954 to 1959, and they now live in Yarm.

    Like

  24. Found the site today and pleased to comment as my two years 1963-65 were amongst my happiest. I joined at 16 from Richard Hind school after getting O Levels(just!!)and eventually got my A Levels and Economics degree. As an opening bowler at cricket the facilities were great and I quickly opened the bowling in all matches and built up a fine partnership with the other opening bowler whose name escapes me but who was big and came from Billingham. An incident regarding beer bottles in the locker at a school play comes to mind.We had a great cricket team and I remember a match against the teachers where we were warned for bowling too fast!! I remember many Saturdays playing for the school in the morning and crossing the road to play for Stockton in the afternoon. Bliss!!I am sure it helped me to play for University and some top Kent and Surrey sides later on. As an aside I remember walking to school each day from Hartburn with friends each morning with us all in love with Susan Henderson who was at the girls school and also lived in Hartburn.The school was split at that time and only mixed for school plays and hockey matches.I can still feel the bruises!.Thanks to all the teachers for getting me through particularly the Economics teacher who was brilliant(sorry forgotten the name)and helped me love the subject which led to a career in banking and insurance.Failing the 11Plus was not the end of the world after all. Pleased to comment on a great school.

    Like

  25. I was at GGS 1956 to 1963 in the class which began “Atkinson (of Tempests fame), Bailey, Baston…etc etc. Tot Munday was revered and feared in equal measure. If you were late for his lesson you found him at the door administering his cane or whatever with the words “Be a little Stoic”. Who also remembers his “Ablative Absolute meaning ..something having been somethinged” and his “Synthetic Caesar” which started “Caesar cum cognovisset quae in hostium castris gererentur, tribunis militum convocati quid fieri velle ostendit”…or something like that. Why can I not clear this stuff from my brain 50 years down the line ?

    Like

  26. I attended Grangefield School between 1995-2000 and yes it looks the same as that picture ( aside from the Tennis Courts now built on the grass in front of those windows) My mum also attended Grangefield for a short period, I think you guys putting stories on here are a little old to remember Mr Parling! Anyone who attended Grangefield in the 80″s, 90″s & 00″S will remember him very well(although my younger sister did inform me he is retiring this year?)! and Mr Ramsey the history teacher. I love looking at old photo”s of school. Memories of the parents saying “Enjoy school they are the best years of your life!!” …oh how I didnt listen and hardly turned up, if I did I wasnt paying attention. Now as I sit at my desk in the office aged 24 thinking ” I wish I could go back…damn I hate it when the parents are right!!!!” Hand on heart I honestly think if it wasnt for Grangefield School I wouldnt be the person I am today…lets just say I ALWAYS tuck my shirt in and NEVER wear HUGE earrings! 🙂

    Like

    • Hi I wonder if anyone can help. I was at Uni with a Geoff Parling from Stockton way back in pre-history and am wondering if he is the same one. I am trying to contact a few of the people from those days for a reunion. Do you know where he can be contacted?

      Like

  27. Recollections of T K Whitfield, fond and otherwise, would not be complete without reference to his famous ‘slipper test’. This was usually a one word answer to 10 or maybe it was 20 questions based on recent work. There were two reasons it was known as a slipper test. First it was written on a slip of paper; and second, those not reaching the required standard were beaten with the sole of an old slipper. Dear Ken didn’t hold back either! After school Ken held extra curricular music. Now, to put it mildly, I had almost zero musical ability but he somehow discovered that I was the proud owner of a very small 8 base piano accordion which, at that date, must have been at least 40 years old. He persuaded me to bring it along to one of his sessions in the hope, no doubt, that a boy owning his own piano accordion must have some potential for the school. I don’t know who was the more disappointed when he discovered that I was in the habit of playing the instrument, not only very badly, but also upside down! Me being left handed this seemed entirely natural! After one very stressful session we came to the unsurprising conclusion that his ability to teach upside down accordion and my capacity to learn would not be a successful undertaking.

    Like

  28. Absolutely right-Mr Byrne was an inspirational maths teacher, although Mike/Dave? Allison and Don Hindson were good as well. Don got the biggest cheer when he walked through the door on the first day of the new Sixth Form College. I still have a full set of my geography notebooks from T.K.”Daddy Ken” Whitfield lessons from the 1960s which cover the UK, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, no European nonsense in those days!!!! French teacher Ducks D”Arcy always got street cred from the boys since he had a good quality British sports car always numbered THN 204 and used to arrange trips to loco depots and Doncaster Loco Works in my day. “Tadge”Taylor the wood/metalwork master could draw straight lines and perfect circles on any substrate without the aid of an instrument.

    Like

  29. It”s really amazing to come across this site and read comments and reminiscences of school chums from half a century ago. I attended Grangefield Grammar School from 1952 to 1959. Here are a few of my recollections, adding to, or clarifying, some recent postings. Corporal punishment was rife. Always on the buttocks. Each teacher had his preferred weapon, canes, butter-pats, leather straps, gym-shoes, chair-leg spacers, rulers. The thinner ones hurt the most. Ken Whitfield (geography master) had a boxwood ruler with a thin brass edge on it. Now that was painful! Old Tot Monday would often wack the whole class if he thought we”d been too noisy while he was out of the room. To us it was all a bit of a game. Our form master and French teacher Mr. d”Arcey would have the offender bend over his desk, then theatrically (all masters wore black robes in those days) raise his gymshoe high in the air while we all made a long, drawn-out “Ooooooogh”, before bringing it down hard as we sang out “Aagh”. The offender would go back to his seat grinning and rubbing his backside. Other teachers, not mentioned as yet, were “Tashy” Lee (physics) and “Dicky” Boyde chemistry). Yes, Ken Whitfield, Tees House Master, made the whole house, about 100 pupils, participate in the music festival. We all had to go on stage and sing as he played “The Happy Wanderer” (Val-de-ri, val-de ra) on his accordion. Apart from making us all back our exercise and text books with brown paper, he would frquently inspect the hands of the whole class. If your nails were too long, you had to go to the front and cut them into the waste paper basket. Colouring of maps with crayons could only be done with perfectly horizontal shading. Many of these maps had to first be traced into our exercise books. Ken would walk up and down the rows snapping off sheets of toilet paper for each boy. (It was that old, shiny, semi-transparent toilet paper which we used for tracing.) “Tot” Monday taught latin, a lot of it by rote and chanting. As he breezed into the classroom he would cry out “Salve, o pueri”. To which we would all respond “Salve, o magistere optime” (Good morning boys. Good morning great master). Another one was “He said that He”. When Tot said that, we would all have to point our fingers at our chests, and sing ou “He said that He, Dixit se”, then point to someone else and sing out “He said that He, Dixit eum”. There were literally dozens like this. I well remember the school cross-country race. By the time we”d reached the 6th form, some of us had had enough of that 5-mile torture. We would dress for it, then watch it via telescope from the physics lab window (Upstairs, between the main part of the school and the dining hall.) As the race wound down, we would slip out of the back and surreptitiously infiltrate into the last returning stragglers, before turning into the main driveway, huffing and puffing to the finish line as the masters cheered encouragement. Yes, Geoff Hutton certainly had a talent for the piano. What has not been mentioned as yet, though, is that he organised a small band which played for the sixth form dances. (These were for the older students from both the Boys and Girls schools.)He was a fine musician and a great MC. As to recent correspondence in postings from Ian Aufflick and Brian Leak, I do admit to slipping into the pub at lunchtime with Brian a few times for a quick pint (and cigarette). Another reprobate in this lifestyle was Peter Atkinson. His house was just across the railway line and we would often go there at lunchtime to play some billiards and sip his father”s whisky (topping the bottle up with water afterwards so it wouldn”t show.) So many memories. Such wonderful days… Several postings on this site also go on to talk about Holy Trinity Boys” School. I have entered some of my own recollections in another posting, at the site location for that school.

    Like

  30. It was nice to hear of David Robson who was in my year at school and to recall tot mundays suit – funny I should remember, David was in Cleveland house and wore a blue cap and was a good rugby forward – I am in touch with Geoff Nattrass, David Rayner and John Wainwright (not recently) – I always thought one of the best teachers at Grangefield was maths teacher Mr. Byrne who was I understand the only one without a degree and also a good soccer player in masters v pupils. The cleverest lad in our year was Brian Shaw who also loved Buddy Holly -maybe cos he wore glasses.

    Like

  31. Yes, Mr Bradshaw had a lovely turn of phrase and given the opportunity, I”m sure he would have called a spade a non mechanical soil displacement facilitator. I am pretty sure Mr Bradshaw was once set up after announcing in assembly that a “Yale-type key” had been found on the playing field, dangerously close to the demilitarised Green Line of sexual segregation with the girls school. For the next few weeks ,such keys seemed to be found with amazing regularity on the field – probably just so pupils could anticipate him using the phrase “Yale type” in order to lighten up our otherwise somewhat mundane assemblies! I think he eventually caught on after a fortnight of increasing chuckles. However, once he took off his glasses in assembly, you realised it was something serious coming along!

    Like

    • Hi Terry this is David Honeyman I was at GGS 1962 – 1967 same years as you I believe. I’ve no pics at all from the school, so would apprecate seeing any that you have. I did find a photo from Roseworth Junior I think you’re on that. I found out recently about the Grangefield demise, a friend had been on one of the final tours. I live in Berkshire.

      Like

  32. Yes, Mr Bradshaw did take against certain fashions. He spoke out in assembly against the “increasing use of RAF style packs”. He meant the cheap surplus store alternative to school satchels, on the top flaps of which the more artistic (and indeed less-artistic)of the early 1960s decorated pop images and slogans.

    Like

  33. My brother John Robson (1960-66) (now a university librarian in Hamilton New Zealand)drew my attention to this website. Charlie Gillett was indeed a member of possibly the worst jazz band of all time, though I was on clarinet, not trumpet. It was more than a quartet – the lineup included Peter Bingham on trumpet, John Wainwright on banjo, Malcolm Bell on guitar and Richard Wimbleby on trombone. Our one and only gig was at a school dance (compered by a sadistic games teacher called Rock Hudson) and we went through a routine of “Marching Through Georgia”, “Margie” and the “Saints”. When Hudson called for a slow one we went into “Tammy” which brought the house down – we were booed off by a crowd of fans waiting for the guitar group to come on. A case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time? Maybe, but we were really bad! I have a very clear memory of Geoff Hutton playing “Ain”t Misbehavin””, but I remember it as taking place after morning assembly. It was normal practice for some young pianist to play us out with Bach or Mozart, and the sound of Fats Waller brought a look of shock and horror to the faces of the assembled staff. Like others I have happy memories of Grangefield in the late 1950s, in spite of its obvious shortcomings (like its apalling separation of boys from girls). It seems to have prepared me well for a serendipitous life. My fondest memories are reserved for “Tot”Munday who taught us Latin dressed in a three piece suit made of rough brown tweed and beat us systematically with a chair leg. Although he wouldn”t have lasted five minutes in today”s pc world, his was a civilised voice. Importantly, for me, he ran the Debating Society and supported the School Magazine, the two things which taught me most. I also remember headmaster Bradshaw announcing that duffle coats (the dangerous uniform of sedition)were to be banned, but, always one to call a spade a spade, describing them as “outer garments made of felt with hoods and peg-like fastening devices.”

    Like

  34. Further reminiscences that might stir somebody”s memory. The sixth form room where we used to pool our daily milk to brew milky coffee which we drank with ginger snaps somebody provided at a shilling a dozen. Such luxury. Buying bags of little green pears and apples from the adjoining property. Was it a farm? Art lessons with Pansy Cleeland, and the day he had us all climb out of the artroom windows supposedly to do outdoor art, and having to scramble back in when he found the head was approaching the room.

    Like

  35. John Bond – replying to an earlier note of yours – we”ve been away a bit – it would be good to catch up, both online and if possible in UK but this isn”t a suitable venue for personal discussion. Unfortunately I”ve taken my email address off this site for a particular reason so you can”t get to me through it. If you”ve registered yours I can ask them for it.

    Like

  36. I don”t remember the school dentist, although I remember the upstairs library. But I do remember our dentist using gas and the horrible smell. The gas was like a truth drug and got you owning up to your misdeeds!. In the first year or 2 in Melbourne I think all my english fillings came out and had to be replaced – either better dentists here or improved technology.

    Like

  37. The comment about the school dentist had me thinking of things long forgotten. This site is an amazing thing. The annual? dental inspection was usually in the library upstairs and the feeling of terror in the queue was palpable. Those fortunate to hear “NRT” (no required treatment) could relax for another year!!

    Like

  38. Ian et al, with your predilection for school dinners, and the fun people have been having talking about food in earlier times, I wonder if you have any stories about the other side of the coin – dentists! Our family dentist was in Bishopton Lane, I think, a Mr Moffatt, a kind generous and public-spirited man, I am sure, but he put a fear of dentistry in me that took some fifty years or more to surmount. I remember the gas anaesthetic ringing in my ears like a circular saw as I went under, and the bowl spinning round close to my face as I came back up again, with him saying “Spit now.” and the school dentist was even more terrifying. Madame L. An enormous Russian, actually our next door neighbour in Whitton Road, Fairfield. Imagine trying to pluck up courage to go and ask for our ball back! I think I lost more tennis-ies on account of my fear of dentists than almost any other reason. she worked in the health centre in Yarm Lane, I think, but I always imagined she had all the equipment – pliers, drills etc in a room in the house, and it seemed much safer to wait till I could afford another ball. Hers was the last house in Whitton Road before the fields. Now I think it”s all built up as far as Edinburgh or whatever direction it”s in. PS I can”t find the previous bit I wrote, but I think a slip of the finger had my brother at GGS ten years earlier than in fact – it would have been the early sixties.

    Like

  39. I enjoyed Jimmy Durrant very much. He used to take annual easter school trips to the Lakes. I remember him showing us a trick involving a filter funnel down someones trousers – the idea being you then poured cold water in. Luckily he noticed he”d picked up a bottle of sulphuric acid and stopped him in time! But that was a rare aberration. He was a great teacher admired by all

    Like

  40. I met Jimmy Durrante in Darlington Memorial Hospital in November 2006. He was in for chest pains and was quite lively. I was with my elder brother Dave. “Barabas” as he was known talked us through the fates of lots of teachers. Interestingly he referred to them all by their nicknames “Chick” “Bull” etc. He said the last thing he expected that day was to be talking to 2 old boys. He honestly had not changed in the 43 years since I”d jast seen him.

    Like

  41. Hi Brian – Mary Rae – that was him. I think you”re right I only came once or twice persuaded by my wayward friend Dick! I didn”t spot the little Aussie flag on your comments, but right again!

    Like

  42. Hi Ian My recollections were me, Marty Rae (also know as Wolf Head), Neil Pallister and Dicky Radge. The landlady used to put on the jukebox for free and we could choose the records. I must be honest I do not remember you being a regular. Then we went back to school to Jimmy Durant for chemistry and had to hold ourselves to go to the toilet before the next lesson. Looking at your postings are you living in Melbourne because that is what the temperatures I have been having in the last week or so were like. Happy new year and all the best PS I can”t remember if we had one pint or two.

    Like

  43. Brian Leak – Was it Marty who accompanied you and Dick at lunchtimes? Can”t remember a surname. I might have only joined you occasionally not regularly – can”t remember. Anyway a Happy New Year to you, John Bond, Charlie Gillett and everyone else and hope you all had a good Xmas

    Like

  44. Ian Aufflick, Amazing. I hadn”t been on this site for months, and clearly turned back to it on the day you decided to talk to me among others. I decided to wait till this morning to reply, when I find your wonderful and long addendum. I will read it again more carefully, but just let me say a few things now. Yes I think we were very good friends, but don”t remember much detail. (Don”t worry about the academic shadow. I”ve had one all my life of some sort.) I also remember the bull. I had begun to think that was something I had made up, but I remember it charging round the playground. I am fascinated by how you found out about my leaving Trinity. I”ve never heard from anyone else what it seemed like. Going to school in Hertfordshire was a complete break with everything and everybody I knew and I don”t think I ever met any old pal”s when I came home for the holidays, speaking like a suvv”ner, talking about “parths and barths, and grarss!” People thought I”d become posh. Nebuchadnezzar was Mr Nesbit the head, with his performing flea. You”ve got me going now. I”m living in Wiltshire, now. Don”t know if that would be on your itinerary but it would be great to meet and share memories. Gosh Ive forgotten all the other bits I wanted to comment on. I don”t even remember being in Mrs Campbell”s class, but I don”t think I could have been in it for long. Were you in Miss Allen”s when I had to sit at her big desk and read to the class – something about the famous five and a flying chair or something? And when we did the Abraham story where one of us had to lie down under the paint table to be woken up, I think by God, and say “Speak Lord, for thy servant heareth.” I think floodgates may be about to open. Those were the days, when sledging meant going down Hartburn Bank on a plank of wood. Good on you, mate!

    Like

  45. G’day mates. I’d forgotten the website having had no quick reply to my comment and only stumbled on it by accident late at night while searching something else with my name in it. What a surprise seeing myself written about – it was a bit like reading my own obituary! Nice to be here to reply to it! This site is buried though – on page n of a stack of school sites with a few earlier ones also about Grangefield. Brian Leak appears on a few, CG also. John Bond. Good of you to remember me. I often wonder what became of you. I remember that one day you didn’t come to school any more and we were told nothing. My father told me later that you’d gone to a boarding school. We’re getting to the age where remembering school days better than yesterday is a bit of a worry! Sorry about the academic shadow bit, I was obviously a self-centred mark chaser even then. Didn’t realize how little it related to life success or even earning power! Ah well, enough atonement and philosophy, I didn’t know you were a playwright and obviously good – any more than I knew of Charlie Gillett’s eminence. By the way in response to his comments Charlie Gillett at school was one of the nicest guys you could meet, straw hair and all. (Hope he’s still got it). I joined Trinity latish in the first form, under Miss Allen. You have a good memory for names. Ron Moyes also came to GGS as did many others I guess. Who was Nebuchadnezzar? I have all school photos but don’t remember all the names. From 32 to 42 kids. David Williamson, Bertie Precious, Tex(?) Richardson, Malcolm Kinnis, David James, Ken Shaw, John Boyes, Bobby Littlefair, Malcolm Liddle. Lots of familiar faces but few names. I think you’re on the 1951 Miss Watson photo, back row 4th from left, beside M Liddle . If that’s you, you’re also in J3 1952 (as you said), under Miss Cochrane (of the ruler on the hand punishments!) sitting on ground at left front, so my memory on dates was wrong. I often recall to the grandkids our horrible school lunches with billposters’ paste for potato and taking turns bringing sauce to school to stir into the stuff. We had to eat everything! I brought YR sauce and even collected a full set of England soccer players I bought so many bottles. (that last mention is because the grandkids like everyone here have tomato sauce on everything. Even pancakes as I heard recently). Were you there when the bull escaped from a Knackers truck (lorry) and ran round the school yard? Salmon – we had to learn hymns on Wednesday afternoon till we knew them. Since joining a church here 20 odd years ago that’s stood me in good stead, as I still know the standards off by heart. Charlie Gillett – I obviously misread. Top Music identity not sports writer. Plenty about you from my googling! I’ve been away a long time! Apart from rugby you were a great runner if my memory’s right – 440 yards then. Was Pete Robson the trumpeter in our sixth form “dixieland” band led by Geoff Hutton with Joe Flegg on guitar, with Geoff shouting chords at Joe all the time? I bought and learned the clarinet to join them but my playing was on a par with what you recall and I was replaced by a better clarinettist who might be the guy you mention. I have a feeling I was a conceited mark grubber at least in lower forms with the aim of getting more marks than anyone else. I must have been pretty antisocial not to follow up our chance meeting in Cambridge. Possibly because I’d worked a year before going up and got distanced, or I was aware of the great difference in our sporting abilities! Talking about sport we could start a new thread of conversation about Australian, Indian and English cricket! (one sport I’ve always followed and played though not at school as I hated the masters – remember Black Jack, and Ambrose). I thought we (aussies) had largely cured that sledging and bad relations attitude under Ponting and was surprised to see the criticism which has arisen. We keep winning because we’re good. I do get sick of seeing Lee (for instance) turning round and jumping up like a maniac in the umpire’s face to appeal. Ambrose is responsible for the biggest blot on my report card – a D+ for woodwork. Paul Dee remembers musical humour. I remember 2 other sidesplitting occasions at school house music concerts. One where Ken Whitfield trooped his whole house of one year on to the stage – it went on for ever to eventual roars of laughter. The second was Len Hutton – school captain – playing Jesu Joy of man’s desiring on the clarinet, getting stuck in a loop and repeating the same sequence over and over to sniggers then laughter till he gave up. Geoff Hutton took chemistry at Newcastle and became a teacher I believe. But after that I don’t know – perhaps he’ll come across this site and like me suddenly find he’s reading about himself. Dave Barrow – so Ken Whitfield, “Bull” Wright and D”Arcy were still there in your day (I was ‘53 to I suppose ’60). Did Ken Whitfield still write BYB on your books if you hadn’t backed them? No-one’s mentioned Chick (Kitchen – chemistry teacher as well as Jimmy Durrant?) who was a good sport. Gammy Dunn and his motorcycle mates doing their ton zoomed past him on the moors once which he took in good part. Also Tot Munday, Latin, deputy head – equally a good sport, though handy with his little stick taken from a chair. I still remember “expergiscere” (sp?) which we could shout at anyone who fell asleep in lessons. Anyone know what happened to Dick Radge (Atkinson reckoned he’d be hanged before he was 30!) – looking up radge on google reveals a lot of funny meanings but no person. Ken Shaw is another name. Colin Fletcher – Have you read the book A Boy from the Village by Restall about your home area? You might be interested that I’m married to a close neighbour of yours from Sunnybrow avenue. Well that’ll do for now.

    Like

    • Ian, I have just come across this website, and am amazed to see my name in your entry. I do remember a Ronnie Restall from Sunnybrow Avenue. Is it his sister you married? Quite a coincidence, as I lived a hundred yards away in Parklands Ave. I have lived near Scarborough for over fifty years. I wish you well.

      Like

  46. Charlie Gillett Well you seem to have ended up with a more colourful life than me – labour candidate , band, sports writer. Actually the once I met you at Cambridge was at Fenners where I was doing Judo, but you”re right – I sold the suit after 1 year and gave up! After that I stuck to snooker – every morning in the Union, and punting at which I was quite good. I relate with pride that I came 143rd in the school cross country and swore at Mr Bradshaw who commented to me that number 144 was gaining on me. I have a form 4 photo with 32 guys on it so I can give you a few more names when I go through it – eg Bobbie Littlefair, Kennan, Bruce Nicholson, Holman, Turner and Ian Hutchison. I remember Geoff H playing after assembly, his Fats Waller usual, and Atkinson (Master) putting a penny on the piano. Strange to think we”re probably all retired now – I was the youngest.

    Like

  47. Colin Fletcher You were also pretty bright – a doctor I presume? You were very good at chess at which I still haven”t a clue. You remember Dave Smith presumably?

    Like

  48. Brian Leek Do you remember the pub in stockton frequented by you, me, Dick Radge – and who else? Was it the Green Tree? We had pies and played the juke box – Tallahassee Lassie was my favorite.

    Like

  49. John Bond Hi John sorry I haven”t been back to this website before now. Of course I remember. I think we were good friends? I thought you actually left from Miss Watson”s class, J2 – before you said. I thought your dad died and you went to a boarding school. Wouldn”t mind getting in touch. We”ll be in UK later this year (now 2008)

    Like

  50. A bit of catching up! Charlie Gillett. I was never asked to join the Shadows! When Jet and Tony left the Shadows they teamed up and had a couple of hits (“Diamonds” is one I recall) as a two-some. They were scheduled to embark on a cross-UK tour to capitalize on their hit records when Jet (as I understand it) because of personal problems, was unable to meet his commitments. I was asked by his manager to replace him. I had just signed the record deal with Polydor and was obviously excited about my own prospects, and obviously didn”t want to leave my own band in the lurch, so I (politely) declined. So far as the mock election at Grangefield I was hoping that I could beat the “Fifth Form Freedom Fighters”! I was amazed, and totally unprepared, to win the whole thing …as those who remember my “acceptance” speech will remember! Geoffrey Daniel: I guess those stains on the bedroom pillow really are brain cells! I had completely forgotten “The Kaliphs” name. But you are quite right! But I do remember the Windhovers, and the front-room recording session. Unfortunately I too lost touch with the Atkinsons. Archie Foulds: Where in God”s name did you find the EP? I once saw an internet site in the US that listed the EP cover (no disc) for $75 (!!!) I even contacted them to find out who was mad enough to pay that kind of money for a cover, but they had “lost” their records (obviously both ways!) To add to the list of GGS teachers does anyone remember “Upsan” Downes – the Music Teacher. It was great to be reminded of some of the old names. I still have some affection for Captain D”Arcy (I was a mamber of Duck”s Army). Does anyone remember those excellent gents who sold bangers at the gates of the Dining Hall (“Belsen”). Cheers to their memory!!

    Like

  51. I have just stumbled across this site and have been astonished at all the memories and connections it evokes. I was at Grangefield from ‘59 to 66. To the staff list I can add Ding Dong Bell, Gordon Rattenbury (deputy), Jim Betts, and Jim Scott (a seminal influence on me as I too ended up in politics as Labour leader on Harrow Council); and I think the ‘Isiah’ (from Howard Spence) was the Chemistry master ‘Jimmy’ Durrant who gave us the classic: ‘Every time I open my mouth some idiot speaks!’ First of all the musical strand – I am looking at a copy of an EP by ‘Les Denvers’ with three lads and two lasses hanging through the iron bars of some impressive gate. The EP features 4 tracks: Little Latin Louby Lou, Do you love me, Mix it up and Poison Ivy from ‘Cinq jeunes copains d’une ville d’Angleterre (Bellingham)’ (sic) – Roy, Brian, Adrian, Jenny and Pauline. I never (knowingly) saw them play live but ‘Poison Ivy’ is the standout track for me. Then there was the Cyclones to whom Brian Humpherson refers – much more my vintage – and they are still on the go. I last met up with them and many other old friends in October this year at my old chum Graham Rayner’s 60th. Joining Brian and Graham, Norman Hardwick, Cliffy Thornton, Mick Wassail and Pete Mackie, along with Geoff Barker – the Cyclones played a blinder. The set list has expanded but still has all the old staples from Chuck Berry catalogue. The Cylones have been the rock around which a good few reunions have reeled over the past ten years. I still remember the classic ‘Summertime’ at Chepstow with Nicole Tibbells from Teeside and the Swingle Singers guesting on lead vocal. Pete Gilroy and Lesley (nee Morrison) had even made it over from Australia to the bash organised by Ned Heywood (now a potter and ex Mayor of Chepstow!). Charlie Gillett used to run a ‘pop music club’ at Grangefield and I will not embarrass him by revealing that Cliff and the Shads featured on his playlist for those of us lower down the school when he was in the 6th form. The Cambridge connection – Steve Clapham, and then I, followed Charlie to Peterhouse at Cambridge. Steve was a runner like Charlie and was I remember the master of cool – with dark shaded glasses. Then after me I think the connection was broken!! I started out on rugby … but soon hit the harder stuff…. ‘67-68 were student struggles … the Garden House ‘riot’ … Senate House ‘sit in’….. great fun! The rugby connection – I played a lot – the first team at Grangefield went unbeaten in my last year and then Johnny Moore and I played for Stockton RFC 1sts on the Sat. afternoons too in ‘66-67 season. I don’t remember drinking before matches! Yes I do remember playing with Colin Sinclair, Ian Fox, Arthur Chapman, Oliver Turnbull. All these were with me in the ‘67 sevens side that won the Barrow and Durham sevens comps and came runners up at Nottingham. I last saw Turnbull just married (in 67 I think) boarding a jet at PIK (I was doing a student summer job on apron services). Then there is the Scott connection – I really cannot remember playing rugby with Tony but we certainly had friends in common at Stockton RFC and lived just half a mile apart. But now comes the strangest twist of all. Howard Spence remembers Tony with ‘a girl from Bradford’. Well that girl was Gerry Boldy. She married Tony in 1967 and they split 10 years later. I married Gerry Scott last year. We had been together since 1997 – introduced (actually several years earlier!) by way of a mutual friend from Peterhouse. The first time I remember meeting Tony was at the premiere of his ‘Enemy of the State’ in Leics. Sq. when he invited Gerry and I. And who else was there but lots of old Stockton RFC players inc Gordon Smith and Richard Dawson. When Gerry and I saw Tony last year in LA the seed was planted for the reunion that Tony organised one year ago. As well as Charlie and co, I even met Arthur Chapman’s wife Stella for the first time there. And after so many years, so many of us were taken back to Stockton and Grangefield. Of course, the heart of the British film industry was forged in Teeside. Not only did it produce Rid (Bladerunner sets being modelled on Teeside!) and Tony but also Frank Roddam whom some of you may remember as Barbie Deehan’s boyfriend (later husband). Barbie and many more of the Grangefield girls still keep in touch with many of the Grangefield boys and long will it remain so. The cruellest thing for me has been that Gerry died in April this year when there was so much to live for and so many good friends to keep and rediscover.

    Like

  52. Just to add to your 25 Charlie is John (Rick) Richardson. About to retire from his construction business on Teeside in order to devote more time to the Boro ( and his several grandchildren). My recollection of Stockton RFC in the days when you played was meeting at the Station Hotel for away games and the players having a couple of pints before getting on the coach. (I was a 3rd team man but we travelled with the 1sts). I wonder how that would go down now. Tony Scott was scrum half with his other main interest being rock climbing which I understand he still enjoys.

    Like

  53. Googled Grangefield and great to recognise so many names although I was part of a younger year – best rugby players our year were Peter Wishlade (now a local lawyer) and David Rayner (retired engineer) – perhaps neither as fast as Charlie G. – went with Wishlade to see Buddy Holly & Crickets at Stockton Odeon in 58 – hopefully some of you also went – remember Ridley Bros. from their house in Fairfield Road – saw Tony later when he was I think studying at or going out with a girl from Bradford- does anyone recall the biology master called “Isiah” as one eye was higher than the other.

    Like

  54. I well remember Goeff Hutton playing Fats Waller”s “Ain”t Misbehavin” – bit of a contrast to the other festival items! I was in the first year at the time – I don”t think there was another Music Festival until about 1964. Geoff”s playing had a dramatic effect – I”m still obsessed with playing jazz piano! Does anyone know what happened to him? Fascinating to read Charlie Gillett”s comments – “The Sound of the City” was an invaluable reference in my own musical career. For a while I was in the same class as Charlie”s younger brother Jan. We were all in awe of Roy Smith playing with the Denvers, but I wonder if any other school produced as many rock bands as Grangefield. Maybe some will remember The Cyclones 1962-64 – actually got together again 40 years later – and still doing gigs!! Geoff “The Blues” Barker is still singing well, and after Charlie possibly the most knowledgable person I know on Rock and Roll. Curious to know if you are still playing Roy. Many thanks to Geoff Daniel for the photos.

    Like

  55. Roy Smith & The Denvers! My recall is that their full tag was “Deke Everett” and The Denvers – or am I hallucinating in my nostalgia? And were they not The Kaliphs originally? I was in the same Grangefield class as Roy for a year or two, circa 1960/61. A few years later I was in a folk band called The Windhovers and Roy helped us produce a tape of our modest efforts in Maggie & David Atkinson”s front room – we made acetate copies and I still have mine, badly scratched. If you know where any of the Atkinsons are now Roy, do tell! I lost touch after about 1969 and remember their friendship with great affection.

    Like

  56. I was at GGS from 64 to 69 when Rupert Bradshaw was headmaster. A few of the other teachers I distinctly remember were Peter “Rock” Hudson, John “The Face” Green, “Daddy” Ken Whitfield, “Bull” Wright and “Ducks” D”Arcy. Happy days!

    Like

  57. Correction ! I mixed up Geoff Hutton with Geoff Hunter also a talented pianist from about the same time. It was Geoff Hunter who became a Canon of York Minster. Apologies to Geoff Hutton who may have been confused over his elevation to the higher ranks of the C.of E.

    Like

  58. I don”t actually remember Geoff Hutton playing Fats Waller as mentioned by Colin Fletcher but I do remember him accompanying Ian Milner on the trombone playing a sprightly little virtuoso piece called as I remember “Wonderful Spring” A group of us directly in front of Ian started to be bowled over with barely contained laughter – Ian bravely continued with his tootling although his face was going from red to purple. Sid Dumbell,the assistant head,sitting across the aisle started by glaring at us but eventually he was shaking with laughter too. My ribs were sore for a couple of days. Geoff Hutton went to Oxford then into the Church and retired as a Canon of York Minster. At school he seemed so much older than the rest of us idiots. Ian read physics at Durham University – a great lad.

    Like

  59. charlie gillet. I cannot let two coincidences go by without mention. a) I stumbled upon my old Sony Award programme for 1992 (I was up for Radio Play – somebody called Stoppard won!!!) In the programme it says you won the Gold award for 1991 and are also pictured with Mark Knopler. b) In the thread here on Grangefield, we are also both included – actually side by side as it were, on the subject of Ian Aufflick. I lived in Ian”s academic shadow at Trinity. Unlike both of you, i was refused entry to Cambridge! by three colleges, but I did get “o” level latin first go, unlike my driving test. Your world service programme keeps me very happily awake many a night and it”s brilliant to know that you are a local lad. Whereabouts in presumably Stockton?

    Like

  60. Have just discovered this site. I was also at Grangefield from 1953 – 60, so Charlie”s list of names brings back memories. I can confirm that Ian Aufflick was streets ahead of the rest of us academically, in the same way that David Smith was with chess. Do you remember Geoff Hutton playing a Fats Waller tune at the School Music festival to stony faces from the staff? Charlie Gillett”s career has been impressive; he won”t remember, but we had the occasional disagreement about music – perhaps he was right after all. I saw Malcolm Ozelton and his wife about 10 years ago on one of their visits to the UK, but have lost contact again. Three names to add to Charlie”s list: Ken Shaw, Ian Kennedy (good bowler), and Colin Storey.

    Like

    • Have just discovered this site. My dad was Jim Stockill. Any stories about him? He died many years ago at the age of 71 and it was great to see a young picture of him in the staff photo. I was wondering why he was known as G?? Also Stirling? He left Grangefield and went on to be Head of Maths at Peterlee Grammar where he remained until early retirement. I know I am biased but he was a clever man academically. He won a state scholarship and Durham university scholarship ….he just loved teaching Maths and wasn’t particularly ambitious. Hope some of you out there have some happy memories of him!!

      Like

  61. Thanks, Stan, for bringing Roy into the frame, because I have more questions for him. (1) Why is “hit” in inverted commas? A hit is a hit! (2) I read somewhere, perhaps on Stan”s site, that Roy was invited to join the Shadows when Jet Harris and Tony Meehan left. But Roy said no. I”m interested to know his reasons. (3) How long did the band last as a going concern, and what did Roy turn to afterwards, for a living? (4) Finally: I think that we were opposing candidates in a mock election at school, Roy as a Conservative, me as Labour. And although Stockton was a solid Labour town, Roy beat me hands down. Is that how you remember it, Roy?

    Like

  62. The group was indeed The Denvers, and our first “hit” (as such) was called “Mix It Up”, and our second (and last) was “Little Latin Looby Lou”. These tracks, with others from our LP, have recently been re-released in Germany on CD. Ron, you probably made the appropriate career choice!

    Like

  63. Charlie Gillett: I have sent an email to Roy Smith of The Denvers asking him for the missing information on their French hit single. He did provide me with all the information on the band for my own website so I guess he missed that part out.

    Like

  64. Ron – I looked up the Denvers on Google and discovered that they made several singles for Polydor in France, and even had an album (which misleadingly but typically presented them as a Merseybeat group). There are inferences that they actually had a hit in France, but no clue as to which song it was. Do you know, by any chance?

    Like

  65. Thank you, Brian, Cliff had me worried for a minute. I knew my memory was getting faulty, but surely it”s not that bad. Yes, I played on the right wing in a team that had several much brighter stars than me, including fly half Arthur Chapman, with whom I”ve stayed friends ever since. Brian, you were a year older than me, I think, the same year as Colin Sinclair, a great runner as well as a good rugby player. You, Arthur and I were among a group who would play for the school on the Saturday morning and then for Stockton”s adult team in the afternoon. One of the other players in the club at Stockton was scrum half Tony Scott, who necver made the first team but has gone on to bigger and better things as a Hollywood film director (Top Gun, etc). Tony”s older brother Ridley, director of Alien, Blade Runner, etc, was in the sixth form at Grangefield when I started, but I don”t remember him. I”m still in touch with Tony, who recently arranged a reunion of friends from the north east including Grangefield alumni Gordon Smith (another scrum half!) and Archie Foulds. Ron, thanks so much for confirming the name of the group – I remember you well, but forgot you were in the band. You”ll remember Mike Purnell, who I am still in touch with. He has lived in Germany for many years with his wife Petra and their two boys (well, young men, they are now).

    Like

  66. Charlie Gillett – the rock group you refer to was probably The Denvers, led by Roy Smith. I was in the group at that time. They went on to turn professional. I left after A levels and thought a career as an accountant would be much more exciting than a rock star!

    Like

  67. Charlie Gillett – and some of us remember you as the demon scrumhalf of the school”s first team. Replaced when you left by Peter “Dinger” Bell.

    Like

  68. Are you THE Charlie Gillett, the respected writer and broadcaster? I used to read articles in Record Mirror many years ago, I always understood that the writer was a local man.

    Like

  69. I was in the same year as Ian Aufflick from the second form through to the sixth. I hope I won”t embarrass him by mentioning that he was incredibly bright, top of the class from start to finish, getting 100% in his exams quite often, especially all the sciences. I was bottom for a while, scraped into the sixth form with five “O” levels, had to take “O” level Latin five times and even then only got the minimum pass of 45%. But strangely, we both wound up at Cambridge together, the first for a long time to go there from Grangefield, although I think it happened quite often afterwards. Ian did Mathematics and Physics and wasn”t interested in sports; I did arts subjects and played any game that was going, so we didn”t know each other well. But he was (and I”m sure still is!) a very nice guy who never said a bad word about anybody. The boy who was always second to Ian was Geoff Hutton, who impressed us by being able to play a pop song on piano after he had heard it only once, and by being the first boy in the class to have a regular – and very good looking – girl friend. I think the next was usually Smith, who played Chess for England schoolboys. Ian Aufflick, Boyes, Stan Brennan, Chesney, Dazzer Davies, Dunn, Dunstone, Colin Fletcher, Gillett, Jack Glattbach, Peter Hawkins, Frank Hunter, Geoff Hutton, Jackson, Matthews, Moyes (yes, the same Ron), Keith Newton, Malcolm Ozelton, Geoff Parker, Mike Purnell, Purvis, Radge, Smelt, Smith, Maffa Stephenson That”s 25 out of 36 that I can remember. The reason I”ve come to this site is that I”ve been remembering one of the most embarrassing moments of my school days, when I was drummer in a jazz quartet which was led by Dave Robson on trumpet. There was a clarinettist and a double bass player, but what were their names? We were support to a guitar group based on The Shadows, led by somebody Smith, a bright fifth former who was also the Conservative Candidate in the school mock elections. I was the Labour Candidate and he beat me hands down. What was his first name? The jazz group played on faltering tune as the people wanting to dance stared at us in disbelief. Did we call this dance music? Well no, now you come to mention it, we don”t. So we slunk off.

    Like

  70. Ian Aufflick, there can”t be two of you. Does this list mean anything to you? Anderson, Aufflick, Banks, Binks, Bond, Bulmer, Batty. I think the next was Cosh, Keith Cosh, and there would have been Ronnie Moyes somewhere further down. Add to that Nebuchadnezzar, Cocky Salmon, Canon Salter and Miss Watson with the strop and the plot thickens. I think I left in “52 to go to boarding school, when we were all preparing for the eleven plus, which consequently I never took. Well, well, well!

    Like

  71. Hi I was at GGS from 1953 to 1960. Nat – I think my brother was in your year. Bob Kidd – I was a year behind you and joined you in the 6th form – with people like Bob Beese I think?

    Like

  72. Robert Kidd.. Yes he did move from Halifax, and yes he served his apprenticeship at Robsons, I”ll forward this page to him, nice to hear from you.

    Like

  73. I was known as Nat and initially attended Stockton Secondary School in Nelson Terrace and moved into Grangefield when it opened in 51 . Some of my contemporaries were Bob Harbron Lofty Hutton Friar Tuck Colin Wright et al .I left Grangefgield at age 15 and went into the Royal Navy since when I have never looked back and have enjoyed a great life. Altough I left early I have many happy memories of Grangefield and I am sure that the high standards of the then Grammar School have stood me in great stead all my life.

    Like

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.