28 thoughts on “Oxbridge Lane Primary School

  1. I was at Oxbridge school between 1965 – 72. I remember Mr Mallon, Mr Ganner, Miss Guy, Mrs Brooks, Mrs Chesney, Miss Blackwood, Miss Roberts. Also the big storm where we all had to put our heads down on the desk!! Think the teachers thought it was the end of the world!

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      • I lived in Mary Street and was at Oxbridge from 1958 to 1964 (and my brother Ian was there between 1963 and 1974) and it was a great school. Mr Mallon was the best teacher I ever had both at primary and secondary school.

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  2. I started Oxbridge school, aged 5, in 1938. I remember Miss Pringle, Miss Woodard, a very fashionable lady. Miss Stodart, daughter of the butcher at Densham’s corner. Miss Williamson, Mrs. Rodgers a very caring person, Miss Demaine and her friend a rather tall lady who’s name I forget. They live in Hartburn Ave, or thereabouts. I recall gas mask tests!. I progressed to the Senior school eventually leaving in 1947 when I passed for Stockton Technical School. Mr.Ward was head of the Seniors. An Officer in the Home Guard. Frank Showell was a prominent teacher and very respected. I could go on. Finally, an anecdote. I had my knuckles rapped my Miss Pringle. For as I saw it “allowing” my head to be pushed through the Caretaker’s window, namely Mr.Bendelow. I will spare you the details. I note the get together in June and hope to attend.

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    • Clive, please check the posting re the Oxbridge School reunion. It looks as if it was advertising an event in June 2015, not 2019. I don’t want you to make that journey in vain.

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  3. It’s that man again – J. Norman Kidd. In my earlier piece dated 23rd January 2005 I referred to my Father, Joseph Kidd, commencing school at Oxbridge Lane in 1902 aged 9. To bring this up-to-date I, being his son Norman, now aged 90, relate the following:
    My Father’s school friend was Freddie Moiser of Marlborough Road, Stockton and also of Oxbridge Lane School.
    On leaving school they both joined the NER railway company and started as lamp boys filling all the paraffin lamps required for use. The first world war commenced in 1914. Joe and Freddie saw the East Riding Yeomanry on a recruiting drive from Castle Eden to Diss in Norfolk passing through Stockton. They both decided to enlist in the East Riding Yeomanry which, at that time, was still mounted cavalry. They signed on at the Majestic Hotel, Harrogate and were sent for basic training to Anlaby Road Barracks, Hull. They were then moved to Strensall near York for more training and then on to the Knavesmire, York where they learned horsemanship.
    After training they were ordered to the Western Front but this order was countermanded and a new order sent them aboard HMS Victoria to Egypt, landing at Alexandria where they learned desert training. At about this time Lawrence of Arabia was ordered to form the Camel Corps from volunteers taken from all yeomanry divisions from all parts of the country. Lawrence was given instructions from his commanding officer to harry and destroy the Senussi and the Turks. The history of the camel corps relates that Lawrence should surprise the enemy by crossing the desert which they did and took Akabah with the enemy’s guns facing the wrong way. The remaining East Riding Yeomanry were sent towards Faiyum, an oasis in the desert and thence on to Gazza where they fought two major battles before finally securing Gazza with the third battle. If anyone thinks that the war in Egypt was a ‘cushy billet’, I recommend them reading the history of the East Riding Yeomanry. While in the desert water and rations became desperate and many picked up water poisoning which affected the bladder with grubs and worms burying into the bladder wall. This was known as Bilhazia of which there was no cure until the introduction of Penicillin just before the second world war. Unfortunately my Father was infected with this disease and was sent home to Dudley Road Military Hospital, Birmingham along with other serving members from Egypt with all types of injuries. It was at this point that my Father met his wife to be (Gertrude Norman) who was a nurse at the hospital. My Mother never forgot the smell of gangerine from damaged limbs. Fortunately my Father was not damaged in this way and was able to help fill hot water bottles and obtain document information for hospital records. I still have Dad’s records signed by the medical officer in charge in 1918.
    When Dudley Road Hospital celebrated its centenary I was able to supply enough material to make a display entitled ‘Romance at Dudley Road Hospital’. I still possess the mementoes given by patients in gratitude for Nurse Norman’s skills post op – they are a water painting of a scene on the battlefield on the Somme, a small leatherette New Testament Bible and an Australian Beaver collar from an overcoat. These are now 100 years old but treasured by the family. Nurse Norman and Joseph kidd married in 1920 and I was born in 1928 when a soldier and a nurse could afford to have a child.
    Freddie Moiser returned to the LNER railway and became Chief Signals Inspector with an area covering York, Stockton, Thornaby, Pickering and Whitby. For his services he was awarded a BEM.
    My Father spent some time with Rogers Engineers in Stockton and then joined Synthetic of Ammonia Billingham and then ICI Supply Department and served there for 33 years. Many of the presentation watches and clocks with inscriptions were ordered by my Father.
    Despite being medically discharged Dad joined the TA in 1937 meeting at the Drill Hall, The Erimus, Middlesbrough. In 1939 the TA went to camp in Tenby, Wales to exercise with their guns. They returned on the weekend of 3rd September 1939 in time to empty his kit bag, refill with clean clothes and then on to the gun site at Grangetown, Sunderland until 1942 when he contracted rheumatoid arthritis and was demobbed.
    My elder cousin Alfred Kidd of Albany Road, Norton joined the RAF voluntary reserve and went to Canada where he trained as a pilot/navigator, obtaining the rank of Flying Officer. He did many bombing raids over Germany before being posted to Scampton, Lincolnshire where he went on to flying Lancaster bombers. He was shot down over the Rheur – the ‘plane caught fire, the crew were ordered to bail out and on landing Alfred was murdered by the Germans in retaliation for the heavy bombing of the area. The ‘plane got back safely and landed at RAF Wittering but that raid cost the life of my cousin Alfred. Yes Alfred I do remember (9.11.2018).
    J. Norman Kidd

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  4. It would be fantastic of all of these memories and any photos could be shared for our 125 years celebration! We are hosting a community evening on 30th June 3.30-5 or 5.30-7 – if you are a past pupil or staff member please get in touch and let us know if you would like to come along – 01642 607421
    Sara

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  5. Myself and Brother went to Oxbridge Infant and Junior School, after our mother died and we went to live with Gran and Grandad in Oxbridge Avenue. Approximate date for me was 1960-1965. I remember our class was in a play, and we were all dressed up as animals and had to hop about the stage. Janice Clark was my friend at the time, and ofter wonder what happened to her. She had a brother who croggied me home because there was a fight going on at the gas works with Oxbridge. Fond memories of Oxbridge School, and when we had to leave, missed it so much as went to a rotten school for 6 months following.
    Then went to a Girls Secondary School. It was a good school, and met some good friends.

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    • Hi Elaine- we are celebrating being 125 years old this term – we are holding a community evening on 30th June 3.30-5 or 5.30-7 – if you would like to come just ring school and let them know which time would be best for you.(01642 607421) Sara

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      • This occasion must have been the reason why I saw some photographs of the school recently. I was amazed that the interior of the school (not just the outside) was almost the same as when I left in 1960!!

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  6. I attended Oxbridge between 1958 and 1964 when the headmistress was I think a Miss Guy. The teacher I remember most vividly was Mr Mallon who was a fantastic teacher…an absolute gentleman. I remember going back to Oxbridge after my first year at senior school (Grangefield Grammar) when Miss Guy looked at my end of year report and told me I should leave and give someone else a chance (I came in the bottom 3 in class!!!)…..if only she could have seen my career after leaving school…..she might have changed her view

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    • Fred Mallon was my uncle and you are right he was a great teacher and an amazing person, he died a couple of years ago and his funeral was attended by some fotmer pupils who shared fond memories of him.He used to cycle to our house in Richardson Road from Thornaby on a bike which was nicknamed The Flying Flash by his 2 sons John and Frank.

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    • I went from about ’53 to ’60 when we moved to Fairfield S.M. “Pop” Mallon was indeed one of the good guys. I remember one time when Kenny Lyons got caned for something and was very upset as he claimed it was a mistake. Mr. Mallon offered to let Kenny cane him to make up for it but Kenny declined the offer!

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  7. I too went to oxbridge 86-93, best years of my childhood were in those walls, fondest memories for Mr Wigam, Mrs Turner, Mr Kitchen and MISS HUTCHINSON! I also was present for the 100 year anniversary, we all dressed in centenary outfits and planted a tree in Ropner Park to signify the occasion, wonder how big that tree is now? If it’s still there?

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  8. Gives me goose pimples looking at pics of Oxbridge School cause I went there as a child and loved it. I attended between 1983- 1993 and loved it so much. Pamela used to live in the old caretakers house and her hubby was caretaker. Mrs Carnell was head teacher but she became sick. Teachers I remember vividally were Mrs Turner, Mr Kitchen, Mrs Browne, Mrs Hutchinson and many more. I was present for the 100 year centenary anniversary where we all dressed up and planted trees in Ropner Park. Ah the memories. Please share your memories…

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  9. I have been doing family history research on my Mother’s side and thought I would contact her old school just to add a little history. Her maiden name was Mary Clapham Todd. She was born in 1906, but I don’t know at what age she would have started school. Would it have been at 4 years old as it is today? On July 30th 1920 was presented with a pewter box and silk handerchief as ‘Prize (by vote) for the most popular girl in the school.’ She left school at 14. Her closest friend was Myra Firby. She had two sisters, Dorothy and Florence who also attended Oxbridge Lane Primary School.
    After meeting my father and getting engaged to him, he emigrated to South Africa in 1936 and she followed in 1937. They married out there and my brother and I were born there. I came over here in 1998.
    I hope this is of some interest.

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  10. What a shame Alan, that Miss Pringle put you down like that. I never recall her being mentioned by my Nan, only Miss Lyndsey who she thought was a very good head and a personal friend. I am going to send a few snaps of teachers in the playground at some point that were my Nans.
    I recall her mentioning little Dolly (I think that was the name), a small disabled girl who was looked after in the infant class whilst her mother worked I think, like day centres do today. Think this was in the 30s-40s.
    She also spoke of a lad she taught who went on to be a footballer of some note but I dont recall a name or which team he played for.

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  11. My Father started at Oxbridge Lane School in 1902 aged 9 years old. The children had learned to write on slates. His writing was copper plate and served him in his employment thoughout his life. He was also an excellent stock keeper which earned him a staff grade with ICI and service in the Quater Masters Stores in the second world war.

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  12. I went to Oxbridge 1939-45.
    As well as the teachers already mentioned there were Ma. Moses, Ma.Wilkinson and Miss Pennock. Mrs Moses lived in the corner house of Durham Rd and Bishopton Rd.

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  13. I remember a Miss Dickson by her name only as I could not spell in Infants school. I have only vague memories of her but they are good memories. I attended from 1942 to to 1946 and a certain Miss Pringle, as I recall, was the Head Mistress. I remember Miss Pringle putting me down when a teacher (Miss Dickson?) took me into the Head’s office and bragged I could read. Miss Pringle looked down her nose and said I had been memorising only. Hmm, what is reading but memorising words and letters and their pronunciation and meaning? I have never forgotten that put down nor have I forgotten the ill treatment of Headmaster Mr (Gaffer) Ward in Junior and Senior school. I did not pass the 11 plus exam. The name Miss Demaine is familiar just by the sound. I cannot recall her specifically.

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  14. Anyone recall my Nan Miss Evelyn Dickson, infant teacher from 1930-1947? Also Miss Lindsey, head mistress who she thought the world of, and other teachers from 20s, 30s, 40s who she remained life long friends with, Miss Stoddart, Miss?, who became Mrs Dorothy Chesney, and Miss Demaine.

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  15. I think that Newtown School is now a Community Centre and Oxbridge School is still running as a junior school and maybe an Infants School.

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  16. Newtown infants/primary school must have been built from the same drawings as Oxbridge Lane as they look very much alike. I attended both schools, Newtown from 1934 to 1939 and Oxbridge later. Is Newtown school now demolished?

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  17. My brother-in-law Tommy Cutler was caretaker at Oxbridge Lane Primary School from 1991 to 1994. He and my sister Joan lived in the old caretaker”s house attached to the playground. They left when Joan became warden at the then-new sheltered accommodation facility at Stockton Railway Station. If memory serves me right the school was well over a hundred years old then.

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  18. The gable ends of this building remind of the architecture of buildings in Brugge, Belgium. All around the Town you see the gable ends the same as this.

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  19. I think you must be right Jim. I will be suprised if someone puts a post on the site to say this is not so. My Father (b1903-d1975) attended Oxbridge for all his nine years of schooling. Which means he was a pupil in 1908. As far as I am aware it”s still in use.

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  20. I think that Oxbridge is the oldest school building in Stockton. The “honour” used to be with the old Mill Lane (which I attended) which was down Dovecot Street.

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