10 thoughts on “Stockton High Street 1983

  1. The “Turner Cinema” was indeed on Bishop Street, a few yards from the High Street on the left opposite where Browns estate agents are now. This small cinema was part of Turners photographic, above their shop.

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  2. If I remember correctly, the entrance to the cinema was actually on Bishop Street. I remember seeing films by Peter Greenaway and David Lynch there, which was a real education. The front of the building, on the High Street, was called Lindsay House and was used for offices by the Probation Service. One time I returned home in the 1990s, at the time of the widely reported “Ragworth riots”, and I saw policemen surveying the High Street from the roof of Lindsay House.

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  3. The Turner Cinema was also the first place in Stockton I visited that was “No Smoking”. It must have first opened it”s doors in 1968 as I viewed the film “Exodus” there with my Grangefield Grammar schoolmate Alastair Cohen. An extremely pleasant atmosphere without the smoke. As mentioned it also showed “artistic” films and I believe “Clockwork Orange” was on the bill before it was a long term no show film.

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  4. I worked at The Turner cinema part time from about 1971-1975. We showed most new films and matinee performances during the school holidays. I remember seeing Pinnochio 24 times! It was a friendly little cinema. The manager of the photography shop downstairs was also the manager of The Turner Theatre. It was down the street where the white building is on the right.

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    • I too worked at the Turner cinema in the 1970s! Worked as a part time usherette on an evening for about two years. I was underage at the time so had to get special permission to work there due to the X rated films. I can’t remember the name of the manager but remember Tony Smith was a projectionist.

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  5. It was certainly very convenient to be able to park on the High Street – except on market days of course. In the centre ground of the photo – slightly to the right is the building that housed what was called the “Turner Cinema” – actually used by the Dovecot Arts Centre to show “art house” film for a short period in the early 80s. Probably the only place in the region where you could see more “offbeat” films and foreign films.

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  6. One day in 1962 while waiting for the number 8 bus outside of Marks and Spencer a lady parked her Morris Minor 1000 nose in on the central reservation of the High Street opposite where I stood. She walked off and a few seconds later the car rolled slowly, but purposefully backwards into the oncoming traffic, turning as it did so. A young guy standing at my bus stop reacted quickly and dashed across and stopped the car by pushing against it with, fortunately, no damage done. The woman,whose car it was returned and the last I saw was of her speaking to a policeman busily noting down the details in his pocketbook!

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  7. CAR PARKING ON THE HIGH STREET WAS VERY HANDY TO POP INTO THE BANK,BUILDING SOCIETY. IT STOPPED IN THE EARLY 1990s AND MANY PEOPLE THINK STOCKTON HIGH STREET WAS NEVER THE SAME AFTER PEDESTRIANISATION,THIS HAS CAUSED OUR FAMOUS HIGH STREET TO LOSE IT”S CHARACTER AND CHARM.WELLINGTON SQUARE HAS BEEN AN ASSET TO THE TOWN.JUST TAKE A LOOK AT THE STOCKTON MARKET 1960S VIDEO ON THIS SITE THIS IS HOW I WANT TO REMEMBER IT NOT AS IT IS NOW.WONDER WHAT IT WILL LOOK LIKE IN TWENTY YEARS TIME.

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