20 thoughts on “Stockton Station Footbridge c1976

  1. I recall crossing this bridge to go to the baths many a time during the early 70’s. It was a strange bridge, a bridge of two halves. I recall the half nearest Primrose hill had oblong concrete slabs as it’s walk way, the other half was floored with sleeper- like wood. The concrete slabs were simply laid in a metal framework, I recall seeing a few missing, (no doubt the work of the local Ragworth, Eastbourne or Primrose Hill hoodlums) revealing a long and potentially life threatening drop to the siding tracks which were then below. I also recall there was also a padlocked gate on the station side of the bridge which opened onto a flight of concrete stairs that lead down to a Water Tower which stood higher than the bridge itself. The other side looked out onto the roof of a long Signal Box, which IIRC was unusually quite low to the ground.. The Stairs, Water Tower and Signal Box were long gone by the end of that decade.

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    • There is still a footbridge in a similar location to this bridge, but I’m not sure it’s the same one? https://goo.gl/maps/G6C3KZPJxG52
      As mentioned in previous posts it was probably 3 times as long when it crossed the marshalling yard and the area has been changed quite a bit over the years.

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  2. Crossed this Bridge twice per day during my five years apprenticeship at Head Wrightsons Stockton Forge Works between 1951 and 1956. I remember the stink from the Piggeries on the side of the Black Path leading to the Bridge. The Signalman on the Signal Box at the end of the Bridge was a friends father for a great number of years, Syd Hopper was his name from Primrose Hill. I good vantage point for all the local train spotters, you could see the Flying Scotsman, the Sir Nigel Gressley, The Mallard and many more. I can remember being very disappointed when I saw the Flying Scotsman for the first time as it was normal looking run of the mill Steam Engine not the stream lined kind that was in operation at the time. It held the World Record for Speed for many years.

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  3. It would seem that this bridge was known by 3 names The Gasworks Bridge, Primrose Hill bridge & the most popularly known as the Prossers bridge

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  4. I used to run home from work in the 60s from Downings iron foundry – usual quick bath, no tea, and go and meet a beautiful redhead on this bridge. Had the good sense to marry her, now 40 years later 3 grown up kids, 6 beautiful grandchildren, got fond memories of prossers bridge.

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  5. As I have posted elsewhere on the site living where I did in Trent Street it was possible to bike to Grangefield several ways, this was one of them, even if you had to carry the bike up onto the bridge. Have the ‘powers that be’ allowed this to collapse? I certainly hope not. I see from Google maps that the footbridges at the bottom of Spring Street and Phoenix Sidings still exist. Those bridges plus the Dovecot Street tunnel meant that the town was not cut off from the suburbs. At a guess they were there for the workers in Stockton’s industries?

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  6. The extra wire guards in the foreground of the top picture was put up after the lads from round the Gashouse used to play chicken & walk over the top of the bridge span till one of them fell off on the signal-box side, he was well looked after by the signalman & he made a full recovery, after suffering a sprained back.

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  7. Crossed that bridge every day twice a day for four years on my way from Primrose Hill to St Mary”s junior school and back. The smell of coal gas from the gas works was overpowering. Spent many a weekend on it too train spotting until my pocket money stretched to a rail ticket to Darlington Station.

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  8. The next legal rail crossing point to the north of the gaswork”s bridge was a foot-crossing near Stockton Bank signal box at the northern outlet of the marshalling yards, but this disappeared with the building of the concrete houses in Doncaster Crescent in the early 1950s, then came Fussick Bridge. As a result it was tempting to save a long detour and take a short cut from say, Tilery to Eastbourne across the lines, which could involve highly dangerous ducking under trains of wagons in the good”s yard. I remember at least one fatality in the 1950s, due to a late night shortcut by this route.

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  9. I grew up using this bridge nearly every day walking from Myrtle Road to town, we used to stand for ages waiting for the steam trains coming out of the station. If a train approached as you neared the bridge we would run like the clappers to try and get to the point where we could stand over the lines and get covered in steam & ash! I remember when I was quite young being terrified as you could see between the paving slabs and part of the bridge had broken and decaying timbers. At the gasworks end it came down to a narrow passage and I can remember it being a bit spooky in the winter it seemed a very dark place with high walls (the gasworks on the left hand side) with pipes and wall mounted gas lamps. You emerged (I think) at the end of Gas Street? There was a pub there too, I think it was called the Gas Hotel – I remember playing there when it was demolished – I”m always reminded of it when that scene comes on in the Likely Lads film where they go back to the pub in which they first started drinking.

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  10. Often walked across this bridge on way home to Ragworth after a Saturday morning swim at Stockton baths with a bun from Griffiths, the shop opposite the baths. Great memories.

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  11. this is for harry iceton l read your comment of years ago and said you remembered playing with a young girl agnes mckenna that was my mam would love to here from you harry – cheers

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  12. a path way starting at the end of Hamilton road Primrose hill and Dundas street and over Lustum beck led to this bridge a few yards away from the station over the railway lines east of Stockton station , it was a short cut to the Gas works, Norton Road and stockton High street, it was a good vantage point for the young train spotters, kids just loved to stand on the bridge as trains passed underneath and feel the smoke coming through the cracks in between the wooden floor boards and side frames of the bridge

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  13. Alistair what a great photo, I knew this as the gasworks bridge. I used to walk from Bute Street (my grans)up Dixon Street, over the railway bridge at Durham Road (next to the station)round the back of the Queens Hotel. Then on through the terraced streets to the bridge. Along what I think was called the black path between allotments and straight on up. Through Primrose Hill and through Ragworth by the shops, across the grass near Fussick Bridge and following the railway up to Roseworth. As usual my brother and sisters and I would spend the bus fare and walk home. The bridge was always the highlight of our journey because of the views of the railway and the length of the foot bridge.

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  14. It is indeed the bridge by Stockton gasworks over the main line and the marshalling yards and led to a path over to Dundas Street, Newtown .The different styles of what is in effect two bridges see t4801-04 might suggest different timescales in their construction, possibly due to an extension of the marshalling yards at some time.

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  15. I took this photograph circa 1976 of the footbridge that crossed the railway East of Stockton Station. When the photograph was taken the bridge was showing signs of terminal neglect.

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