Rose Cottage,Bishopton Lane, Stockton. 1910

The first image in this series is a view of Bishopton Lane including Rose Cottage in 1904. The second is a close-up view of Rose Cottage in 1910 and is taken from Heavisides Almanack 1910. The last picture shows the same building partly demolished c1990’s after being the base for Guthries Taxis.


18 thoughts on “Rose Cottage,Bishopton Lane, Stockton. 1910

  1. Jack and his brother Bill ran the taxi firm from Bishopton Lane while their mother still lived in the cottage. Jack came to live in the next road to where you used to live Benny in Hartburn, Bellerb Road, two doors away from me and one day he came round and persuaded me to go and drive for him for a few weeks due to staff shortages, it lasted for well over eighteen months. Every Wednesday and Saturday night, either on Stockton Station or on the two car taxi rank in the town, in the same place as the rink is now. More often than not the only cab either on the station or on the town rank. In those days it was half a crown a mile per journey and half a crown an hour wages plus tips, which on a Sat and Wed Stockton Market days were nearly always better than my nights wages. We drove big Ford cars with newfangled radios which didn’t always work which gave all the cabbies lots of headaches but lots of fun. Jack and his wife Margret moved to Billingham and Bill and his wife went to Thornaby. Jack was younger than me because I dont remember him at Richard Hind so it must be in your teaching time at Richard Hind, Ken. I think Bill still does the school for the taxi which they sold out to a few years ago.

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  2. Bob. Thanks for retrieving that fact for my tired mind’s sake about Jack. Mr Guthrie had many interests and supported many causes. Even back in those days he was an enthusiast with cameras, still and movie.

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  3. It was Jack Guthrie who was at RH. He started there at the same time as me. Ken can you remember that Jacks father gave a cine film show at the school? I can’t remember whether it was for the whole school or just our year.

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  4. Benny, you are bound to be correct about the elder Guthrie. In schools of the year size of Newham Grange & similar it was a case of everybody knew everybody else!
    I wonder whether my confusion & error involves Scouts. I recall that the Guthries, parents and children, were very active in uniformed organisations.
    Stockton Parish Church had uniformed organisations which variously used the Vestry at the church, the Parish Hall in Corporation Street and the former stables/garage at the back of the then Vicarage immediately above Densham’s Corner.
    Those buildings were later used by the Eagle Club, wonderfully led by Frank Showell.

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  5. The elder Guthrie boy definitely attended Newham Grange School and was one year ahead of me Ken. I remember an incident when I hired a car off him and parked it in the car park behind Debenhams, I then went shopping in the market and returned to the car with my shopping only to find an empty spot where I had parked the car. I dashed off back to let Guthrie’s know what had happened and we jumped in another car to see if we could spot the stolen car, after about an hours fruitless search we gave up the chase. My ex school friend asked me to show him where I had parked the car, this I did and he then asked if I was sure it was this car park, ‘Is there another’ I asked, ‘yes over there’. To my total relief and embarrassment the car was parked in the exact spot in the second car park.

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  6. The midnight train to Kings Cross from Stockton on a Friday with our fathers was the one we used to go to see the F.A. Cup-Finals & stroll across London early morning to Wembley.

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  7. A fascinating set of photographs especially the 1904 one with the station in the background. I remember well the first time Dad took me to London, travelling on the overnight train to Kings Cross. One could stay on the train on its arrival in London until a respectable time to start visiting London. Stockton Station was a busy place at that time of night. Remember setting off on trains to Redcar for our holidays. Redcar had a special platform then called something like Redcar Excursion Halt. Of the Guthries Taxis, I remember the Guthrie boys as pupils at Richard Hind Sec Tech School and also as ‘senior’ members of Stockton Parish Church Sunday School.

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  8. What a lovely house it was and what a mess someone has made of it. On my mams birth certificate it gives the address as Rose Cottage, Stockton, Co.Durham – that was 1925. I wondered if this could be the house or was there another Rose Cottage at that time??

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  9. The gable end notice says "TRY MCNAUGHTON’S STEAM LAUNDRY" the Globe notice is indeed on an out building. At the time of the picture the West Stockton Iron Works were directly behind the Station with the old clay pits. Although looking closely at the picture it could well be the tall entrance to the Station and the Station Offices then the glass Roof over the tracks behind. None of it is there now so unless we can get more pictures we will never know. The Carriage could have come either way, there is a small carriage to the side of it which it could have pulled out to pass or come directly up the bank. At that time there was an underpass from Durham Road under the station to Cardigan Street. Slightly further north off Lucan Street was the Vulcan Rivet works and then the gas works, a very busy area in its time hence the large housing estate built for those workers.

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  10. Bill, the large advert on the gable end in the 1904 photo says "Try McNaughton’s Steam laundry". This laundry has been talked about elsewhere on this site (see Image no. 2935).
    McNaughton’s Laundry was in Station Road off Bishopton Lane, so it was quite near to the site of the advert.

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  11. The 1904 picture is a real cracker. I don’t think the ‘Globe’ ad poster is on the gable end of the main building, but on the end of the single storey building that is still
    there in some form to this day. The large ad billboard above seeems to be on the gable end, but I can’t quite make out what the ad is for. You can plainly see the station clock, and possibly the tower at the end of Durham Road, or Atterby terrace as it was then, in fact my parents still called it by that name well into the mid 60s, but what are the two high sections of roof behind the station buildings? I presume one is the main station arched glass roof, but what of the other, I always assumed there was only one such roof at the south end of the station, and two at the north end.

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  12. Postings for image 1180 tell how Frederick Raimes (of Hartburn Lodge) made his fortune by marketing "Globe" metal polish. You can see a large advert for Globe Metal Polish on the gable end of the house on the corner of Alma Street.

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  13. The 1904 photo is interesting. Judging by the people who stopped to watch the coach and four pass by, there must have been somebody important inside. I wonder if they had arrived by train at Stockton Station? Difficult to see if they had come up the bank or from the station due to the wording across the image.

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  14. Not sure about the dating on 3rd photo. I have a photo of Guthries Taxi’s taken in 1998 and has the roof fully intact, although, the taxi office is boarded up and has roadwork’s in place outside.

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  15. There is very recent photograph picture of Rose Cottage with demolishing in place c1990 shown in the comments section of this week (roof members visible etc) – is it possible for the team to place the photo here? For those who are not in the know, it was situated at the bottom of Alma Street on the north side of Bishopton Lane. The contrast between shows how we have not cared enough for the old attractive houses of Stockton.

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  16. When we look at the picture of the filling station in Bishopton Lane, in the recents comments on 3rd July. It is hard to believe that Rose Cottage is the same building.

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