Newham Grange Park, Stockton c1950

Benches beside a footpath leading up to a pavilion in Newham Grange Park, Stockton. The path is lined with trees and bushes. c1950Trees, bushes and benches beside a footpath in Newham Grange Park, Stockton, leading up to a pavilion. c1950The pavilion in Newham Grange Park seen from a distance with a tree and bush lined footpath leading up to it. c1950

11 thoughts on “Newham Grange Park, Stockton c1950

  1. Can anybody tell me if there was a budgie/canary enclosure along the footpath at the back of the monkey tree shop? There is a concrete foundation still there and I am sure, as a kid, I remember seeing bids there.

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  2. I visited this park again quite a few years ago to take my sons and show them where our family spent many happy times, (in the 50’s) especially in the school holidays. Walking, picnics, etc. There were many beautiful trees of all types, the grass was mown regularly, the flower beds were always extremely well maintained with seasonal flowers. I had told them how lovely it was, and as we walked around I was very disappointed to see the place had been vandalized so badly, it was no longer a nice place to be. Needless to say we didn’t stay long. It is very sad that we have beautiful places to spend family time only to find that the minority have to spoil it.

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  3. Chopping Down – No not shopping but chopping. Eight/nine years old, one pine tree and a blunt axe, the wooded area which still remains wooded after the pouring of many thousand gallons of concrete in the name of modernisation and progress. The trees are in a triangle between, Durham Road, Ketton Road and Knitsley Walk, no houses there just woods fields and an orchard about where North Tees Hospital is now; I think they called it Bells Orchard, originally part of Piper Knowle Farm. Well this pine tree took about eight days to fell, get up, breakfast, over Durham Road chop, chop, back for dinner, back over and so on, I can honestly say with hand on my heart this was not an act of vandalism by me, this is only my memory and the perpetrator was my younger brother Howard. The talking point at home was can you get any logs off it, with all the will in the world and his blisters, no way were there any logs coming off that downed tree. I couldn’t help as I was not athletic, not then, now or in between. The wooded area looks bare now but I can assure you he only felled the one. Roy.

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  4. I remember the park being built not sure what year I think about 1934 or 1935. My uncle was one of the workers building the park,I lived in Hawthorne road at the time and my mother made a dinner for him every day wich I had to take to him. it was a nice park well looked after. In my courting days we often walked along the pathway from Durham Road recreation ground along by the the ddurham Road cemetry across the road and up to the Mile House a favourite walk. Through the main ornate double gates near the park keepers house a few yards down the pathway on the right was built an air raid shelter sunk into the ground and loads of soil put on top during the war for visitors if needed. I had some happy times in that park playing football, bowling, etc .I have lived in Australia for the last 20 years and on my last visit to the UK in july 1906 I visited the park and was disgusted to see the way the park had deteriated and the amount of vandalisam that had taken place. It was really sad to see it knowing how nice it was a few years ago,

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  5. I have only seen `The Park` since around 1996, and at that time it had already mostly closed down. I`ve heard that there used to be two football pitches in the park, but that seems to just be a big field now! The Bowling still exists, but you have to be a member to play there! It is normally fenced off, I presume to protect the green against the vandals.

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  6. Can anyone tell me how old the lodge is at Newham Grange end of the park. I spent most of my school days off wondering round this park and playing. im currently renewing the windows and most of its interior. This is also plagued by vandals total shame. Me and my work colleagues recently updated both lodges at Ropner and they look superb

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  7. How sad to hear about the decline of Newham Grange Park. We played a lot of football, putt and tennis in the park. Even did some of our early courting there!! One wonders what has gone wrong in a world where morons seem to spoil everything for the majority!!

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  8. I knew Newham Grange Park as a child and adult in the 50s and 60s. It was a lovely place for walks with tennis courts, lawn bowling , putting greens, soccer pitches and a playground for kids. It was well maintained and had a nice pavilion. At the entrance on Bishopton Lane thro” an ornate double iron gate there was a wardens house, occupied I believe by a park manager. This park had large greenhouses for growing bedding plants in the many flowerbeds. There were also large rhodedendron beds which were magnificent when in flower. In the 60s my father and I used to walk thro” it typically on sundays on our way to the The Mile House for a lunchtime drink. It was starting to fall into disrepair by the late 60s I think. I remember there was a lane on its eastern boundary which started at Newham Grange cemetery crossed Bishopton Lane and came out at Durham road near The Mile House. I was told it was the remains of the old stagecoach route from Stockton to the north,it would be interesting to know more.

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  9. Look up Friends of Ropner Park (FORP) on the Internet. They are doing a great job. I just hope they can avoid vandalism. Why is this a problem in the UK ?

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  10. This park was great when I was a kid tennis courts a good playground but then it got vandalised to death and now is a shell nothing at all is there. I went back last year and still recognised every single tree but the benches are missing the tennis courts dug up and no playground. They still have bowls there bit it has had to be locked up behind a big fence what a terrible waste of a good park

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