12 thoughts on “The Endeavour and HMS Kellington

  1. This is indeed the Stockton replica of the Endeavour. It was intended to be floating accommodation for youth organisations and was eventually fitted with hammocks, a galley and showers and toilets. it was also open to the public for viewing and was mainly manned by volunteers known as “Friends of the Endeavour”, I was chairman of this group for six years. The ship can not sail, it would be too unstable and it is not fully rigged or fitted with operating steerage. It sadly closed due to lack of funding a few years ago. The Australian replica is of course a fully operational ship and first came to Whitby in 1997 when an estimated 100,000 people lined the harbour and cliffs to see her arrive. Many visits were to follow including Middlesbrough and Hartlepool. She is now back in her homeland owned by the Australian government. I was a guide on both ships and sailed on the Australian version.

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  2. Blue water sailing is a passion of mine. Over the years I have followed in James Cook”s footsteps so to speak sailing the eastern sea board of Australia, around New Zealand and the Tahitian Islands in French Polynesia. Where possible I have used copies of the charts Cook made on his three voyages to the Southern Hemisphere supported of course by a state of the art GPS. The accuracy of Cook”s chart work is nothing short of remarkable and a tribute to one of the greatest navigators of all time. Thanks for clearing up the Endeavour replica mystery.

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  3. Regarding Stockton”s connections with Captain Cook – Stockton Parish Church published an information booklet about the church which contains the story of Captains Christopher and Cook and the wood from the “Endeavour”, unfortunately this story does not stand up to scrutiny. There was not a Christopher (William or otherwise) in any of the crews for Cook”s three voyages. The “History of Stockton” by Heavisides includes a section on Wm Christopher in which he states that Christopher himself made and fashioned the Communion Rails and the Rails supporting the Holy Table from some drift oak that he picked up during one of his voyages. According to Heaviside the staircase in Christopher”s house (that subsequently became the vicarage) was also made from the same drift oak.

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  4. I have in my possession, a copy of Captain Cook’s hand written letters, and the original drawings for the original conversion of a Whitby east coast collier of 368 tons into the Endeavour. She was 106 ft long and 29ft 3 inches in breadth. These documents are in a nice attractive folder of that period were produced in 1968 by Wiggins Teape Ltd copied from the original records in the British Museum and the National Maritime Museum(by special permission) It would appear that the company or a company in their group produced the original paper etc. Also there are copies of various hand drawings of places he visited and animals he saw, previously never seen in U.K. before. Copies of pages of the ships log. A hand drawn map of Tahiti by Captain Cook. I have had these since they were printed in 1968.

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  5. Endeavour – The Stockton Link Captain William Christopher b1734, sailed with Captain Cook on his third and last voyage 1779. On the breaking up of “Endeavour” Christopher donated a length of timber from that vessel , which became the altar-rail of the Parish Church. He added a staircase from the ship to his town house, opposite the Parish-Church (McClarens). Christopher went on to be Senior Commodore of the Hudsons-Bay Trading Company of Canada, one section of that bay carries his name “Christopher Sound ” (this was during attempts to find the N.W Passage ) Leaving the Company he became ship-owner and builder in Stockton. Buried in Norton St Mary”s, Captain Christopher has a wall tablet to his memory in the South or “Pity-Porch” inscribed with the Hudsons-Bay Fur Company Crest

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  6. David I think there may be more than one replica of the Endeavour, and the one on the Tees is a permanent resident, as I do not think it goes to sea any more. I have seen the Australian version in Sydney Harbour. Can any one clear this poser up.

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  7. I am sure that there is some confusion about this photograph. I believe that this is the metal hulled Endeavour replica which was built in Hartlepool and is now permanently moored at Castlegate Quay in Stockton and not the sea going wooden replica that has visited the area from from Australia.

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    • The replica Endeavour that is moored in Stockton was not built in Hartlepool, it was built at the Aveco yard on the River Tees by Dennis Aveling who for 58 years ran his shipyard near South Bank.

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  8. David – this is not the Australian replica Endeavour, this is a steel hulled vessel that was built to Endeavour proportions. She was built to just the deck level so she could just come under the bridge in the background at low tide. Her masts were fitted later. She was not built to sail, merely to provide youngsters with a place to learn about Captain Cook, and act as a visitor attraction. Although I never quite understood why she was built for Stockton which has no real connections with Captain Cook.

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  9. The Endeavour replica was build in Western Australia. I am curious as to why this vessel pictured has no masts and does not appear to have the “great cabin” which is located on the stern of the replica. The ship has now returned to Australia and is moored at the Australian Maritime Museum, on Sydney Harbour.

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