The Bone Hotel c1900

This wonderful picture shows the Bone Hotel in Stockton.  There is writing at the bottom of the picture to say that it is on the corner of Oxford Street to the right and Dobbing Street in Stockton to the left.  Photograph courtesy of Chris Corner.

Thanks again to Chris for the additional photograph which shows a bit more detail

32 thoughts on “The Bone Hotel c1900

    • Hi Margaret, I lived in 16 Oxford Street the next corner down from you, and remember you and your brother Paul who was a friend but both attended different schools also another sister Ruth I think , spent a lot of time in the Bone Hotel, at closing time of course playing the juke box. I remember your dad Harry and it was the first time I saw bunk beds in your rooms, also kept in touch when we all got moved out, your family went to the brand new estate of Hardwick, my mum and dad picked Roseworth, lot of years ago but really remember that area well

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      • Hi Alan, thanks for the message I do remember the name, Paul lives in Cowpen Bewley with his wife and Ruth still lives in the house we moved to in Hardwick.

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  1. Henzell Street & Dobbin Street were the first streets from Norton Road. Donald Street was a second,because Clarence Street was the first on the right when you entered Oxford Street from Norton Road,also Richmond Street did not run from Norton Road it run from Clarence Street along the bottoms of Donald St.,Emily St. & Francis St.,there was a alleyway that ran between Zion House & the Commercial pub into Richmond St.The last street off Norton Rd. was Railway St. just before Strike’s Mission.

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  2. The two pubs which were in streets that ran parallel to Norton Road were the D.L.I.Club in Farrer Street,the Queen Park Medical Centre is there now & the Gas Hotel(always had a good darts team in the early fifties) in Langley Street was near the Gasworks & had St John’s Church & Hall at the back of the pub.Hope this refreshes your memory Bob.

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    • Anon. I would think it was the Gas Hotel and I think it might have been the Camerons League, not sure though. This was in 1958ish.

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  3. The Bone Hotel was one of a number of pubs in the Gashouse area,others were the Gladstone in Thompson Street, the Gas Hotel in Langley Street, the D.L.I.Club in Farrer Street & the Royal Albert at the junction of Allison Street & Hume Street. Others on the perimeter were the Commercial on the corner of Railway Street, the Turks Head on the corner of Thompson Street and the Board Inn & the Queens Hotel both on Bishopton Lane.

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    • Once played a darts match in a pub on the gas works area. Can’t remember what it was called but I remember they had a big belly stove in the bar and it was red hot and was next to the dart board. Some one told me at a later date that they fuelled it up before a match hoping to put the away players off. I do know the pub was in a street which was parallel to Norton Road.

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    • Had a few drinks in all of them one time or another, on leave it would be the DLI club. Knowing quite a few of the lads from the area we did tend to have a pint before heading off to the Palais Maison or Jubilee dance halls. Jimmy Roberts lived in Fordy Street, Charley Garbut and Noel Kiddle, Tommy Robson all names that bring memories. At various times the Boilermakers would meet in the Commercial or the Turks Head though initially it was the Lord Nelson, it was a vibrant area at that time and what amazed me was it went from green fields to a close community and back to virtually nothing in less than one hundred years.

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  4. The white sign above the door read as follows, Good Health to His Majesty, King Edward holds Britannia,his empire holds the frisky,Sheffield holds the English cup,and the Bone Hotel the whiskey.

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    • With the sign referring to King Edward, it is unlikely that the photo was taken in 1900, as Edward did not take the throne until his mother, Queen Victoria, had died in 1902.

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    • 1902 is probably the date of the photo. Sheffield United won the F.A. cup in that year, beating Southampton 2-1 after a 1-1 draw.

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  5. It`s hard to make out the licensees name on the board,but according to the trade directories,in 1900 it was a Frederick Yoxall. Does any one have a date for when the pub closed down? I believe it first opened for business some time in the 1870`s.From 1926-1938 a Mrs Ellen Morgan ran the pub.

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  6. The Bone Hotel did not change much in fifty years, only the wood sign at the top of the building was missing in the fifties.
    Chris, which street did your great granfather live in?.

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  7. The three men in the photo seem to be wearing military campaign hats, which could tie in with the Mafeking connection.

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    • The photo of the Bone Hotel I have, belonged to my dad. Its printed on cardboard, and it was cut in three piece. The one I have is the middle. I never found why it was cut up. I have an African two bob bit dated 1895 which belonged to my grandad. He used to have it on his watch chain.

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  8. Chris, your comment about the “Relief of Mafeking” is supported by the headwear that the men are wearing. All three appear to be wearing what were known as slouch hats, a design worn by some of the soldiers in the Boer War.

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      • The soldier on the left is my Great Grandfather, Christopher Little, and was certainly local. He was in the closing stages of the Boer War, in the Imperial Yeomanry. We have no idea who the other two are.

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  9. I had a pint in the Bone the night it closed with some of my mates a couple who came from that area. As you go along Norton Road from Maxwells corner towards Norton you had Laing Street, Tennant Street, Hume Street, Bone Street, Thompson Street, Oxford Street and Richmond Street. The cross streets two rows back from Norton Road were from Bone Street;- Henzell Street, Dobbing Street and Donald Street. The Bone Hotel fell out of use as the people in that area moved to Roseworth and Hardwick, many pubs in the town also went the way of the Bone I had a pint in the Customs House the night it closed with my pal Noel Kiddle, his mother used it for a quiet drink. The old style Pubs lost out firstly to the clubs then the general movement from the Town to the outskirts with more modern new build pubs and finally are being knocked out by the no smoking and drink driving bans as well as cheap supermarket booze. Is it a sad passing? I often saw mens wives in the pub trying to get the wages before it was spent on a Friday so for some it was a boon. The changes in habits over the last fifty years have seen the trend from drinking after work turn into a night out with a meal or a night in with the TV, we had no TV so everything was out of the house, well until I married and my wife put her foot down, TV was just arriving so watching a small flickering black and white screen did start to take us over. Nostalgia gives us fond memories of those pubs although thinking back they were basic and often dirty.

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  10. I believe the man on the corner in the middle is my great Grandad. On the back of the picture, someone has written ‘relief of Mafeking May 17 1900’

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      • My grandma’s parents lived in Oxford Street, they were the Harrison’s. the men were iron founders.

        On another topic…..does anyone know where the glass works used to be in Stockton?

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      • As a baby I lived in 10 kirby street in 1935-9 then we moved to 22 Oxford Street during the war while Dad was in the army I would call at my grandmothers at 9 Donald Street on my way home from Tilery school where my father lived until he got married Chris Corner is my cousin.

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