Ask Us

Is there anything you would like to know about the Borough of Stockton, its history, its industries, its buildings or its people? Just add a comment with your query to this page and we will endeavour to answer it. If we don’t know the answer it may well be that some of our site visitors do…

NOTE – Please use the ‘Reply‘ option when answering a query.

2,197 thoughts on “Ask Us

  1. I’ve recently become more and more interested in acquiring a vintage cycle made by the taylor brothers of church Road, Stockton. I’m wondering whether anyone knows if the building still exists and if it does not, a good idea of where it was and what now is in its place. Although I know Church Road in Stockton, it has gone through many changes in recent years and being only a spritely 36 years of age, I am at a loss to remember exactly where my late grandmother told me the Jack Taylor factory/shop was.
    Many thanks if you can help.

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    • I think Jack Taylor’s cycle shop was on Norton Rd on the right hand side as you leave the High St around along past where Pete’s snack bar used to be.

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      • The shop you talk about on Norton Road belonged to Bill Beattie. One of the main bikes he sold was the Claude Butler, but another was the Lance Bell. Lance Bell was the original owner and Bill Beattie bought the business from him but Lance Bell did work for Bill and continued building the bikes. Jack Taylor did all his business from the workshop in Portrack.

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      • Jack Taylor’s factory was down the bottom of Church Road on the right hand side after passing under the old railway bridge heading towards Portrack.

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      • I should have remembered that as he once fixed my bike when I managed to get me Derailleuer gears into the spokes of the wheel, it made quite a mess of everything 😦

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    • Jack Taylor Cycles was set in a small factory unit, on a siding near to Church Road. Sadly the unit is no more and nothing remains as such but a empty space of land. There is some steps, still there on the south side of Church Road and these would have led up to the siding and Jack Taylors would been around there. There is a possibility of getting a vintage Jack Taylor bike on ebay or maybe at the York Cycle Show, but these bikes are very much sought after.

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  2. For the information of ex Head Wrightsons workers. On Friday 26 the April at the Preston Hall Museum there was a launch of a book called ‘Life at Head Wrightsons’, ‘Memories of working at Head Wrightsons’. There are about 90 contributers of people who worked there and have given their memories of times when they worked there. Also there is a free DVD supplied with this book. I have watched the DVD and have read part of the book which is very interesting. This is a good buy.

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  3. Does anyone have any photographs or information on The ‘Gardners Arms Pub’ which I believe was in Hunters lane, Stockton? It was close to Paradise Row. I’d really appreciate information. thank you.

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    • The “Gardeners Arms”, Hunters Lane was a beerhouse (licensed only to sell beer not spirits). Its address was no.5. The earliest date I can find for it is 1876, when John C. Smith was the licensee. The last licensee I have found is Mrs Florence Golden in 1938. The building was still standing in the late 1940`s, although it was no longer a pub. There are photos elsewhere on this site which show Hunters lane in its later days. There was also a “Gardeners Arms” in Thistle Green. This was also a beerhouse and closed in the early 1900`s.

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      • Thanks Martin for the information, can you confirm that a Mr Fredrick Matthews was ever a Licensee at the “Gardeners Arms Inn”? It may have been around 1930’s. Any information will be appreciated. Thank you.

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      • Frederick Matthews is listed as a beer retailer (usually meaning a beer house or off licence),at 5 Hunter`s Lane,Stockton-On-Tees,in Ward`s 1936-37 trade directory.

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    • Whilst reading thro’ the question section I came across your letter. I’ve often thought about finding out about the Gardeners Arms, as I, like my brother was born there. Myself in 1944, my brother in 1942. I remember nothing about the place except in about 1952 I visited the remains of the building, which had been knocked down. If you therefore have any information you could share I’d be obliged to you.
      It was used as a pub until then as my parents were the publicans or as the tax form for 1944 says ‘ inn keeper’ for that year.

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  4. I was wondering if anyone who worked at the gas works, Stockton between 1965-1970 has any stories about their time there. Thank you Terry Crisp.

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    • Some of the gas fitters who worked in the gas works,Terry you should know Charlie Rose who was an older brother of your sister Sandra’s friend Margaret, Ralph Jordison, Lenny Sewell and Tommy Murphy.

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      • Thanks for the reply gentleman, Charlie Rose, and the other guys I knew. 2 other people I was interested in knowing their where abouts are Brian Fagan and Peter thornton?

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    • Hello, Terry.
      Are you by any chance related to John Crisp? John was a great friend of my late Dad, Trevor McKenna, who lived in the Stockton area in and I just wondered if you knew him. My dad would be in his 80s now. They used to play in a jazz/swing band in the 1950s at the Coatham Arms in Redcar, I think. My mum’s name would have been Margaret Harrison before they were married. She is still alive and often mentions John when she talks about my Dad and the mischief they used to get up to!
      It would be nice to hear from you when you have a moment, even if it just a quick ‘No, not me’!
      Thank you very much.
      Jackie

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  5. Hi, Could anyone tell me where the Barrage Balloons were sited at Stockton in WW2? My mum worked on them and dad used to go by in a train as a fireman. I am trying to write the story of how she locked him up in a nissan hut before their romance began…

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    • I’m not sure that there was a depot as such but the balloons were sited around the industrial area’s such as ICI Billingham, the River Tees and it’s shipyards and the steel works . I think the main Balloon Centre for this area was at Longbenton in Newcastle although there may have been a repair depot on Teesside possibly at Thornaby aerodrome or the Army depot on Junction Road in Norton ? I have seen a list of local barrage balloon sites , possibly in Teesside Archives in Middlesbrough ?
      PS ; it’s nissen and not nissan , as in a Japanese car company !

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    • There was Barrage Balloons at Browns Bridge, when we were at Newtown School in the forties the anchor blocks were still there just off Bishopton Road near Lustrum Beck.

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      • When I lived in Bedford Street in the early fifties I remember them being on the left hand side coming down Bishopton Road bank from Stockton there was also some huts on the field we used to play in, I would think these have been built over by Browns Bridge estate, as kids the fields at this time and Thomsons scrap yard full of stuff from WW2 was a kids paradise great place to live.

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      • I explained at Browns Bridge side of the beck and I would not think the blocks are still there unless they have been used for the foundations of the new buildings.

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    • Ann Walford of Norton was a Flight Officer in charge of Balloon Command in the Billingham area during WW II. The RAF took over part of a large house in Norton and had their Ops room there. She was in charge of the balloon sites around the I.C.I. On receiving news of an incoming raid she would be driven to all her sites in a motorcycle-sidecar to give instructions to the women to get the balloons up. There was a team of 10-20 WRAFs who lived at each site and operated the balloon. The army sometimes brought in their “Smokey Joes” which produced copious quantities of smoke to obscure the factories from the air. Presumably the industrial sites in Middlesbrough were covered by a different Balloon Command unit.

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      • The barrage balloon, filled with lighter-than-air gas, was attached to a steel cable that could be raised or lowered using a motorized winch. In forcing enemy planes to higher altitudes bombing accuracy was hampered. The cables themselves presented a hazard to enemy pilots, capable of shearing off a passing plane’s wings and propellers. They were intended to protect sites of great importance at ground level from the threat of low-flying German bombers . The barrage balloons, which were set at heights of up to 5,000 feet, would force these aircraft to fly high, making them less accurate, and bring them within range of the antiaircraft guns. Initially, the powers that be, working on the basis that 10 male balloon operators could only be replaced by at least 20 female balloon operators, began to substitute women for men in the squadrons. The women rose to the challenge and showed that 14 women were quite capable of replacing 10 men and this was eventually settled as the correct figure. By December 1942 10,000 men had been replaced by some 15,700 WAAF balloon operators.

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      • There is a lot of information available on barrage balloons thanks to Mr Google and here are two local links about the balloons at ICI Billingham ;

        http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/47/a5383947.shtml
        and
        http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/stories/30/a8948730.shtml

        There is a a book entitled ‘Balloons at War’ by John Christopher , published by Tempus in 2004 which has lots of illustrations about the use of these balloons .

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    • There was a balloon site at the bottom of Tanners Bank Norton and I remember well the girls manning the large mobile winch mounted on a truck. The balloon was always inflated but tied down to concrete blocks with cables hanging from the side of the balloon. The girls from there, along with some from Thornaby, lived in the cottage across the back alley from the Priory in Norton High Street the alley and path took you through to the open air school..
      There were several sites around ICI and on open ground behind Richard Hind School near the railway.
      One Saturday when they were all up we had a storm and lightning brought most of them down in flames. They had heavy cables on them and those cables would drop like stones, we never found out if anyone got hurt as that kind of news was never published.

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    • WW2 There was one Balloon Sited on the old pottery field just off Norton road almost across from to the Brown Jug Pub, just below Hills Joinery works. and could be seen from the Stockton, Norton, Hartlepool railway.

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  6. I noticed a lot of kids in black blazers with blue braiding going to school as they passed my house, then realised it was the opening day for the North Shore Academy School at Tilery which has just been recently built… Maybe a photo will appear shortly…

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    • Bob thanks again for your good comments yes it was a better horse but what a pity it died under suspicion, as from today (Wednesday) Black Caviar is to be retired and will probably go to stud. I attended Westbury Street school and then onto Robert Atkinson Secondary, I lived in Georgiana Street ( George Street end) and in 1949 to Brotton Road in the council estate.

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      • Keith, you and I must know each other has kids, I lived around the corner from you in Barnard Street, and attended Robert Atkinsons also, I recall the teachers Hooky Britton, Joey Hutton, and the two hated teachers: Coleman the French teacher, and Dunn Technical drawing. I think Mr Smith (a lovely man) was the joinery teacher, but he may have been at Arthur Heads when they did the ‘changeover’. If you don’t know me then you must have know our Tom who was three years younger.

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  7. Stockton Bookmakers. Does anyone remember where the old fashioned back street bookies used to stand in Stockton, and recall what went on? Down Middlesbrough on a Sunday morning they used to have “Toss-A-Penny games” (actually 2 pennies) around the Cannon Street area with large groups of men taking part, I was a child and did not understand the rules, so could anyone tell me how you won, and what did the game organisers pay out on? and did they paly this in Stockton.

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    • I recall my Dad, who lived in Parkfield area of Stockton when he was young, telling us about a game the men played in the back streets called ‘Pitch and Toss’. Apparently all the men would scatter if a policeman came on the scene. Sounds as though it could have been a similar game Bob. Maybe the penny that landed nearest to the wall!! The reason I say this, is that in the 1940s we played a game with the old round cardboard milk bottle tops, nearest to wall OR landing one on top of the other. We threaded all the ones we won on a knotted piece of string. We didn’t play for money however. People today talk about austerity, they don’t know the meaning of it.

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      • When I worked at Head Wrightsons as a joiner from 1953-62 HW’s had properties in the Bon Lea area. These houses were rented from HW’s by their workers. One day we were doing property repairs at one of the houses when a crowd of men ran through the house from the back to the front. They had been gambling or otherwise and were getting away from the fuzz.

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    • Bob in Australia the Diggers during the last war had a game that was similar and
      played with two pennies it was called two up. Two coins were tossed into the air and the bets were placed either two heads or two tails falling to the ground. This game is still played today usually on Anzac Day (remembrance day for Australian and New Zealand forces)

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      • Hi Keith, in Australia, and must say “We wish We Were There” – with you during the coldest March since records began for us. I’m certain the game you mentioned “Two Up”, is the same game, it was very popular in England, and I understand on Sheffield Town Moor, over a 1000 men showed up to play it on Sundays, with the coppers looking the other way so as to let the men have some fun.

        Like all Brits I / we know about Anzac Day, 25 April each year and obesrved by a wide variety of ceremonies and services in Australia and New Zealand, including a dawn requiem mass, followed mid-morning with a commemorative service, and after lunch an organised sports activities with the proceeds of any “Two-Up” gambling going to Battalion funds. I’ll make a bet with you: If there’s not the name of a Robert Wilson (my name) on your towns War Memorial, I’ll donate £20.00 to your local church, or any Austrialian Anzac Group you name! God Bless Australia and it’s best ever representative a racehorse called Pharlap. How’s that for a bet-digger and cousin!

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    • Starting work I found men would bet on anything and in the first six weeks the toffee nosed so and so from Norton Green had four bare fist battles. These took place on the marking floor of Browns Sheet Iron shop, the top floor of a three story building. We were not allowed to fight until lunch time, all the men would take their cans and sandwiches up to the top floor form a ring then lay bets, the Toffee nose from Norton not being favourite to win, wrong. Steve Small who could well handle himself became my second and to see fair play, if the Ref’s favourite was winning it could become a very long round if he was losing a short one. Three wins and one draw later the bookies refused to take bets and the draw saw the biggest fight of them all as the men laying the books refused to pay out, they did in the end.
      Dick Brown one of the brothers would come up and stand at the back watching, he would then bellow right back to work sometimes after we had gone over time.
      Working a lathe facing flanges a chap stopped the lathe then marked some initials on the chuck plate and set it off. A group standing near the fire said when Tom shouts stop the lathe, so I knocked it out of gear when Tom yelled and then waited until it stopped. they came and inspected the chuck where it had stopped near the cutting tool nearest won the pot, I just stood there amazed.

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    • Bob, many thanks for your kind comments you have had the coldest and we the hottest in 100 years, we would have with pleasure swapped with you but now at long last we are now back to a normal Autumn.
      Your comments about PHARLAP were very true we now have a new one that is doing the same thing her name is Black Caviar she has had 25 races and won 25, this is the same one that won at Ascot last year. Best regards

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    • Bob with you talking about the Diggers I would like to tell you about April in Australia, It is Anzac Appeal Month and all monies raised goes the RSL (RETURNED SERVICES LEAGUE) Veterans Funds. I have just bought a Diggers hat lapel pin $5 and there are several prices to pay and they do very well at this time of the year. This of course is similar to your British Legion. I love ANZAC Day because after the dawn service
      the march is televised and it is a good three hour telecast. Although I love Australia I am still a THORNABY BOY at heart. Regards Keith

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      • The whole of Britain was watching Black Caviar run at Ascot, and highly amazed the jockey relaxed in the final yards. Definitely a great horse but Pharlap was far better, He won 32 races as a 3 year old, with 2 x 2nds, A clue to his speed is seen in his last race at the Agua Caliente Racetrack, Tijuana, Mexico, which is regulary visited by Califonia top class racehorses, Pharlap smashed the track record! PS: What school, what part of Thornaby?

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    • Bob, I think we were there at different times for Robert Atkinson because all of the teachers you mentioned except one, I remember. The one exception is Tech Drawing we had a Mr Horsley or so I think. I do remember a boy called John Wilson in our class he was one of the brainy ones, I left school Christmas 1951 and went on to be a file clerk with 608 squadron RAF Reserve at the aerodrome for a little while.
      Yes our paths may have crossed who knows… I still family in Thornaby Stockton and Eaglescliffe so I keep up with the news…

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    • Laurie Moore was a bookie that stood outside the Dolphin pub, on the end of Ryan street. He had look outs all over and got away before the police arrived.

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  8. Bob Wilson, yes never though of that mate, was thinking about another photo the Gazette took of me in 1975 when I pulled a big 27″ salmon out of the river tees during one lunch break, I was a moulder at steel foundry at the time, never did get a glossy copy, would have loved to have shown my grandchildren. I will get straight onto the Gazette about the Brian Clough photo. I did know of some one with a copy, he promised me a copy but sadly didn’t turn up, thanks Bob.

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  9. I am researching the Johnson family who resided at Balaclava Cottage, Balaclava Street in 1911, Lewis Johnson was an Engineer/ Instructor, Ann Johnson nee Dunn was his spouse they had three sons, Lewis, James Edward and William Lewis all were Engineers also two daughters, Mary Johnson, and Annie Johnson, Annie was an Assistant Headmistress.
    Lewis Johnson Married Isabel Dowson in 1914, Isabel’s Parents were George Dowson Assistant Stationmaster and Eliza Dowson. Lewis Johnson and William Lewis Johnson joined the Royal Flying Corps during WW1.
    Any information would be greatly appreciated.

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    • In the 1960’s a young Lewis Johnson played drums in a local group called The Crestas. Photographs of this group can be found on the Stan Laundon website. Lewis was a painter and decorator he worked for various local companies including Cameron and Oxberry, now retired he still lives locally.

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  10. What organisation is the group photograph used as heading it shows 12 men in top hats and 9 ladies? I am searching for any possible photographs of The Stockton Rural Sanitary Authority Board my ggg grandfather Henry Smith was chairman in the 1880s believe the above was the forerunner of the now Stockton Council

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  11. The photograph at the top of your front page today shows 3 Stockton Grammar lads with their fingers in their ears, and unless I am mistaken, from about 1967. Is this photograph on the site somewhere?
    I run the Stockton Grammar Old Boys website and I don’t think I have seen this one before.

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  12. Some fantastic information on here but I can’t find the stuff I need so I’ll ask!
    Does anybody have any information on Barrett Street circa 1892? one of our relations Hugh Cassidy with a son called John lived there but I’m sure if it’s Portrack or Tilery would be appreciated if anyone can help!!

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    • Caroline – Barrett Street was in the Portrack area of Stockton in 1891 – I have been looking up the Census Returns for you, but cannot see a Hugh Cassidy. However, there is a ‘Jno’ Cassidy residing at 18 Barrett Street as a Boarder, aged 20, single and born in Ireland. In the 1901 Census, there is a John Cassidy, aged 30, residing at 7 Maritime Street, Stockton-on-Tees (not too far away from Barrett Street) and is now married with a young family which includes a four year old son named Hugh! Perhaps this could be one of your relations. I have details of this family in the 1911 Census also. If you wish to get in touch, please ask Picture Stockton for my e-mail address. Regards – Maureen.

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  13. Any old Tilery Road boys out there with a photo taken at old Billingham baths about 1961-2? The photo I’m talking about was a group photo with the late Brian Clough, think it was an inter-house swimming competition, I was in Ropner {red} David Applby, Denis Carter, John Calvert and too many to name were in my class, all mentioned were good swimmers, I represented the sholl in the Cox life saving competition David Applby/Dennis Carter,/John Calvert and one other lad who’s name escapes me, sorry for that. I have tried for years andn years to get hold of a copy of the photo with Brian Clough.
    Oh yes, I think we came 3rd or 4th in Cox life saving, in my class I remember it for being a class of great lads not a bully anongst them, all the best to all Derek. Please look in the old Biscuit tins for the photo!

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    • Derek, it’s almost certain the Evening Gazette in Borough Road, will have this picture in their 1961- 2 achives, they throw nothing away, if Cloughie was the Middlesbrough Manager then ask the football club archivist. Write or phone the Gazette the search is free, the photo will cost a fiver. If you find it – do post it on here, were all dying to see what you look like wearing water-wings!

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  14. What part of Stockton was Smithfield street? A family lived there in 1915 called Bean, I would love to be in touch with any descendants from this family as we are related through marriage, one of the Bean lads was killed on the same cruiser as my great uncle, Mark Tippey in 1915.
    Please ask the picturestockton team for my e-mail if you have any information. Thank you

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    • Derek, somehow I’ve got it into my head you’re related to Britains best ever Stockton born comedian James Casey, who was much better known as ‘Jimmy James’ from Stockton and if that’s correct then you must be ‘our Eli’, uncle or cousin. I intend to walk in the Brown Jug public house one day, and will ask the landlord “If Derek Casey’s been in” and “was he carrying a little box under his arm with a giraffe inside it? If he says that you’re sat over there I will buy you a pint and a ‘wee nip’ for your giraffe!

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      • Bob Wilson, you’ll buy me a pint will you? My local Brown Jug closed some time ago and due to be knocked down soon. I was always told by my late father we were related to Jimmy James and his side kick Eli, but no documents to prove it. From memory his lot came to Stockton from Wales, my lot from Glasgow after leaving Ireland c1840s. Bob did you know the Bean family from over Thornaby way? They were connected to the Large family from Portrack, Wally and Joe Large married mother and daughter I think, Wally was a good mate of mine in early 60s. All the best Bob, Derek.

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      • Derek, I’ll have to ask around for you about the Beans, they must have been a quiet and respectable lot, because I’ve never heard of them. I was sorry to hear about the Brown Jug, 40 years ago I used to employ a few men who just about lived there, and whenever they were needed for a job, I had to go and drag them out. Did you know there was a stabbing around the back of the pub about an 100 years ago, and I seem to recall the mush who did it got hung. Stockton North End Pigeon club used it as their clubhouse and the pickup point for the birds on a Friday night by the Up North Combine.

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      • During the 40/50s Jimmy James lived in Arncliffe Avenue in a bungalow, around the corner from my Aunty, and Doreen Casey lived in St. Bernards Road.

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  15. Does anybody know or have any knowledge of what happened to Billy Cowley who we believe was an Army boxing champion? On November 8th 1915 a boxer from Stockton, Billy Cowley (the peddler) stepped into the ring in London to fight the great Bermondsey Billy Wells in front of 3000 spectators. He was beaten; KO’d in 3 rounds by Wells who had weight and height advantages. Billy Cowley fought 146 contests, won 81, lost 44 and drew 20.

    Billy’s last fight was in Stockton on 13th February 1922 he won against Bob Walker of Thornaby at the Stockton Royal skating rink. This was 16 years after his first fight in Hartlepool on 3rd March 1906, west Hartlepool Circus in a 6 round fight against Jack O’Brien. Billy was my dads uncle and was last seen serving ale behind the bar of the Navigation in Middlesbrough.
    (All boxing records I have were supplied by Miles Templeton).

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      • Bill Cowley did have fights in Newcastle. His first, 19th November 1907 against J Young (Newcastle) which he won on points; 20th April 1908 against Tom Cooper, Bill lost on points; 12th October 1908 against J Mitchell,(Gateshead) Bill won on points. These 3 fights were held at Newcastle Ginnets Circus.
        From 4th October 1909 to October 1921 he fought more than 30 fights at Newcastle St James Hall. I have dates and names of people he fought. His last fight at this venue was on 20th October 1921 against Nichol Ford (Consett) where Bill lost on points.

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  16. Does anyone have any pictures of the lorry and tankers that ICI Billingham used in the late 1960’s? My dad Fred Oliver was a long distance lorry driver and used to drive all over the country delivery his load. I would love to see a picture of one.

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    • I have a print of a 1960s Foden eight wheel ICI tanker taken from a painting, ask Picture Stockton for my email address and I’ll send it on.

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  17. Anything known about my family; the Walls Family? Many of whom lived In Metcalfe Street as did relatives the Tinklers and Rentons and my Grandma Margaret Elders Wright who I found in the census of 1911 lodging with the Tinklers.

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  18. I’m looking for anyone related to the Hoey/Eastall family? Anyone related to those names? I am doing some research on my family history.

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  19. Has anybody got any photos of the bottom end of Bickersteth Street by Whitehall Terrace (a Goods Yard wall off No.1 Bickersteth Street) please? From the 1950s to before it was demolished c1964/65. If you have, copies would be very much appreciated, thank you, David Jones.

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  20. Shine TV (makers of the BBC’s Masterchef, Channel 5’s Eddie Stobart: Truck and Trailers and Sky 1’s Got To Dance) are making a brand new and exciting series for Sky 1 exploring the ‘dance history’ of Stockton-on-Tees.
    They would love to hear from anyone who has a story to tell or fond memories about the former dance halls (The Palais de Danse, The Jubilee Hall, Maison de Dance), Club Fiesta and The Globe Theatre…
    Please get in touch via Picture Stockton and we will pass them on to Shine TV.

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    • Would that be the Dr Hopkins-Husson who held a surgery in Wyndham Street, Portrack? If so he was my doctor until I left Stockton in 1963.

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      • When I was a patient of Dr Husson, the surgery was in Barrett Street, next door to the Portrack Cons Club. He later had surgeries on Norton Road and Hardwick Estate.

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  21. Remember When, Evening Gazette Saturday March 9th 2013. The best pictures I have seen of Maddox’s Mill and next door Browns sheet iron works building on Prince Regent Street Stockton. There are also pictures of the front of Maddox in West Row and the Shop Silver Street, it all brought back instant memories of walking down the street to work at Browns, this is the only picture I have seen of the complete frontage of Browns.
    Do we have these pictures on Picture Stockton? If not we should have…

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  22. I am keen to know the history of 11 Finkle Street in Stockton. It is now apartments but I wonder how it looked when first built and who lived there. Can anyone help?

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    • My grandmother Janetta Crawford was caretaker of the health offices at 11 Finkle street for many years until her retirement. My grandfather had been killed in an accident at the I C I and Nen brought her family up there. She had the whole of the upstairs floor as her living area and she cleaned the offices twice a day.

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  23. Is there any way to display the details and comments on the pictures that you show in the banner at the top of the page.

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  24. Can anyone tell if there is a War Memorial in Yarm and if so is there a person on there called Alan Wilstrop. His parents lived in West Row and his father was the village postman there for years. His mother was my mothers cousin.

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    • The Yarm War Memorial is right next to the Town Hall , on the south side near the pedestrian crossing . I don’t have any details of the inscribed names but I’m sure there is a small booklet with them all in at the Stockton Reference Library and quite possibly Yarm Library too ? I’m sure someone else who knows will reply soon !

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  25. Does anybody know the previous occupants of 45 High Street, Stockton, before Winpenny moved in around the late 1800’s? My Great grandfather is listed as working there.

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    • To our knowledge the occupants of number 45 High Street from 1828 onwards are as follows…
      1828-44: Matthew Henderson, draper
      1847-60: Edward Henderson, draper (also his residence)
      1860-80: Henderson and Maw, drapers
      1880- : Northern Counties Grocers
      1894-96: D Warr, hatter and hosier
      1896-1981: E Winpenny, hatter and menswear

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      • MacMillan House was gifted to the Conservatives after Macmillan ran for Stockton. I don’t know where his offices were during his campaign, only that they were not MacMillan House.

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      • Harold Macmillan would use 24 Richmond Road in Oxbridge to hold some meetings and I believe he lodged there from time to time.

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  26. I’m just revisiting a notebook which belonged to my grandfather, Joseph Tinkler (1884-1945), boilermaker of Wynyard Street. It’s a little book of things that interested him and is fascinating. There are several pages of lists of sums of money paid (received?) weekly over a number of years. I wondered if he was at one time Treasurer of a club. The only club I believe he was a member of is the Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes. Is there still a Stockton branch and am I right in thinking he could have been a member?

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    • There is indeed a Stockton Branch of the RAOB clubstill in existence. It meets at Buffs Social Club, Norton Road, Stockton-on-Tees. (I got this next bit from their website) Third Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes meets Wednesday at 7:30pm. Includes information about the lodges plus royal antediluvian order of buffaloes Knights Chapter 139 and Roll of Honour Assembly 127.

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      • Funny story… once when I was in the bar at the club and it was one of their meetings, which was also cowboy night. The Buffs members were there dressed in the full regalia with dickey bows and the others dressed as cowboys in there full regalia with guns and holsters. It was like being amongst Hollywood actors.

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      • Thank you for that! Could you also please give me the postcode for that address. I can’t find their email contact!

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      • That’s very kind of you! I haven’t really been away. I’ve been watching the new site with great interest and I’m still finding my way around. The notebook I mentioned has set me many questions about my grandfather, but they are not really relevant to Picture Stockton. I’m curious how a boilermaker on shiftwork in the early 20th centurycould accumulate so many facts of history and general interest in a household where books were very scarce.

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  27. Does anyone please have photos and / or details of The Lyric Cinema which used to be on Worsall Road, Yarm in the late 1950’s? Thanks Pamela

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  28. I am looking for a picture of a shop owned by my family in 1897 it was run by J.E.SMALING on 15 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill. The shop was a grocer, draper and general provision merchant. I have been given the last order book from 1897 and the measuring stick they used to measure out the cloth. If anyone could help me I would really appreciate it.

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  29. I am really intrigued into the history of waterloo mills, many of your pictures say that the mill was demolished. Does the mill not still stand today housing Joe Rigatonis?
    If there is anyone who can give more information on the history of the building there, that would be a great help.

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  30. Can any one help with information about Haverton Hill? My Dad Leslie Webb was born there in 1929. He has developed Alzheimers and comes out with information which might be or might not be correct. He said he lived in Oak Street and Clarence Street. The Salvation Army was in Clarence Street, next to the Butchers Shop and opposite the clothes shop run by the Philips family. Thank you Carol.

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    • I have a connection to the Phillips family and I’d like to see if this family are my Phillip’s family. Thanks, Sarah.

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    • I lived on Clarence Street from 1945 to 1953. I was born on the street but moved away when I was 4 to avoid the war. My parents owned the Salvation Army hall after the church gave it up. Across the road was a clothing shop called Levys. It was run by a man known locally as Bob the Jew. He was assisted by a woman called Jessie. They were a lovely couple. My mother’s friend was Hannah Phillips who lived on Elm Street, off Clarence. Her brothers were Jim and Peter. None of them married. They came to Haverton from Port Sunlight in Cheshire, along with my grandfsther’s family, the Holdways. Hope this helps.

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      • Hi, I remember Shirley and her brother Billy (her mam and dad Molly and John(?) ran the chip shop on the corner of Clarence St. and Ash St.( Best fish shop in England !!! ) Billy and I regularly played cowboys and Indians around the white-shed on the Bendy. What I am seeking is photographs of Haverton Hill school (Windsor Street), and to contact anyone who went there from 1945_1955. Is there anyone out there who remembers the Rose family from Elm St ?

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    • Hi Carol.
      My name is Syd Swan I used to live at 25 St Vincent Street HH. I was there till 1960 when we emigrated to Australia.Sorry I cant help you with your dads statements.
      I had aunties living in Marlborough Rd. I went to school down the road, can’t remember the name.
      I am also looking for information on Haverton Hill and where did it go.
      Regards.
      Syd

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  31. Does anyone remember the fish and chip shop in the circle at Haverton Hill, ran by my Mother and Father, Margaret and Robert Caygill in the 1950s? They then went on to run the Newsagent in Windlestone Road. They had three Daughters; Ann, Freda and Susan Caygill. If anyone remembers us, we would love to hear from you.

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    • I used to be a paper boy at Windelstone Road. I was paid 10 shillings a week, I am sure I was better off then than I am now.
      If any anyone reads this do they remember another paper boy called “Snagger”

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  32. We are three quarters of the way through renovating our house on Ragworth Road, and although we have a lot of original plans of the house, we have yet to find any images. If anybody has any, or could direct me to somewhere I might find some, it would be greatly appreciated.

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  33. Has anyone any photographs of the YMCA in Dovecot Street which was attached to the Cannon Cinema? The outside was a bit incongruous (spelling?), but the inside warm and welcoming. My wife Joan and I met there in 1962. I have a few photo’s of some of the ‘gang’ on hikes and trips but none of the building or it’s interior.

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    • The St Ann’s Hill farmhouse appears to have once stood on the north side of the high area known as St Ann’s Hill which lay between Lustrum beck and Portrack Lane. It’s access lane was probably on the line of Talbot Street, adjacent to the former recreation ground on Norton Road. This area was obviously a very prodigious source of clay from which for brick and tiles could be made, as several such manufacturing works grew up across this particular area of the town, hence the name ‘Tilery’. The farm’s name does not appear on maps after the mid-19th century presumably the farm land was sold to facilitate large scale brick-making, as thereafter the population of both Stockton/Norton began to expand very rapidly. Hope this helps Sheila.

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      • It is a while since I used it, but I am reasonably certain that British History Online mentions St Ann’s Hill and Farm : the site is very easy to search.

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  34. Does anybody have any further information about the products that were manufactured at the Cork Insulation and Asbestos Co. factory, and whether these actually contained asbestos? I have been searching for more details about “Kalsil”, “Fiberoc” and “Eldorite” and the presence of asbetos on the Thornaby Works site but have been unable to find very much information online. Any information would be very much appreciated.

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    • I remember when being a joiner at Head Wrightsons we would go into Cork Insulation ‘slag wool’. This was used as sound proofing when we made partitions in between offices. I have recorded on here that when building work was beginning on the Teesside Park I saw a large area surrounded by barriers with notices telling people they were clearing the area of asbestos.

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      • The sheds and warehouses in Cork Insulation were made from white asbestos corrugated sheeting, this is what they would be stripping, not manufactured asbestos products as such, there was none of these on site.

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    • REF CORK INSULATION:

      A Company named Union Cold Storage Limited, (dissolved) London, who owned Dewhirst Butchers Limited and the Blue Star Shipping Line, bought the site in the pre-WW2 war period from Crosswaites Foundry (in liquidation) the intention was to make cork and asbestos Insulation for lagging Blue Star ships sailing from the UK to Australia & Agentine, the venture was not a success and, in 1960 or thereabouts, they commenced making ‘loft insulation (Slagbestos Rockwool) this ceased in the 1977 period.

      They did not use asbestos at all or make it, they did have some 25 kilo sample bags of it to experiment with for making an high temperature pipe lagging called Kalsil. For various technical reasons including health and safety they decided not to use or handle asbestos products and no asbestos pipe lagging was made in commercial quantities. Kalsil did not contain asbestos.

      All I can add is the factory was dusty and an unhealthy place to work in, and to my knowledge a large number of the former staff died from cancer. But having said this so do 1 in 3 of the general population. For what it’s worth ‘Kalsil’ sales in the UK were of no great consequence. The danger of asbestos fibres was well known to the Cork Insulation Directors, who knew well of its dangers. I can be contacted via this website and trust this information is of some use.

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      • As I grew up in Britannia Street, the area that included Cork Insulation was part of our playground. I remember one day while messing about that I sunk into a pile of the off white fluffy stuff up to my thighs! At the time my main concern was that there might be rats in there and I was wearing short trousers!! I do wonder what we ingested one way or the other in those days, still the worrying could kill you too.

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  35. I have recently been looking at a picture on the site which indicated that the building in Nelson terrace was on the corner of Dovecote Street but I believe that the building was further down and on the corner of Wellington Street, the building on the end was the Co-op store I say this because I think the flat roofed Building on the extreme left was the co-op restraunt. Can anyone help?

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    • Colin, there are so many photos of Nelson Terrace that it is difficult to know which one you are referring to. Please could you post your comment against the photo that you think has been wrongly located?

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  36. I’m looking for a photo of my Great grandmothers Fish n Chip shop, it was on Sydney street and Nelson Terrace. Her name was Esther Mary Eastwood it was called Esther’s Chippy I also what to find out when it was bought by her mother, we think it was sometime in the 1920s. Thank you.

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    • Well Katie, I can’t help you with what info you want, but I just had to comment when I saw the name Eastwood and the address. I used to work for a while with Vera Eastwood in Hairdressing,she married Bob, can’t remember the surname, I am now 97 so I do have an excuse.I hope you find out what you want to know, and if Vera is still around please say Hello and pass on my good wishes.

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  37. Back in 1926 or later my Grandmother donated a family bible (McPherson Family Bible) to Hebron Hall. Could you tell me if there is some sort of archive where things are stored or documented? I would really love to track this bible down. Can you please help?

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  38. Does anyone have any further information on Captain Cooks mother GRACE PACE, who was born in Thornaby On Tees?, brief details as follows: Cook was the second of eight children of James Cook, a Scottish farm labourer from Ednam near Kelso, and his locally born wife, Grace Pace, from Thornaby-on-Tees. In 1736, his family moved to Airey Holme farm at Great Ayton, where his father’s employer, Thomas Skottowe, paid for him to attend the local school. In 1741, after five years schooling, he began work for his father, who had by now been promoted to farm manager. For leisure, he would climb a nearby hill, Roseberry Topping, enjoying the opportunity for solitude. Cooks’ boyhood cottage home, his parents’ last home, is now in Melbourne, having been moved from England and reassembled, brick by brick, in 1934.

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    • Bob, I have researched Grace Pace and her family and would be pleased to let you have the data which is too extensive to upload here. Please ask Picture Stockton for my e-mail address so we can discuss this off-line. Thanks, Cliff.

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  39. Was Tilery Primary School built on the site of a cemetry? I have looked all over the internet and can’t find the answer. Maybe someone who visits this site can help. Thanks

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    • Donna, there is a website called Stockton Roots, run by Stockton Birth Deaths and Marriages Service, They have listed two cemetarys, Durham Road and Oxbridge Lane, The records are supposed to go back to 1837, I tried random searches for Stockton using the sample names Smith, and Wilson, and alleged sample burial dates between 1837-1900 it appears the data is incomplete as I got no results at all. I do know small churches had graves around the outer walls, and 300 yards from Tilery there’s a church with a statue outside it which I’m sure once a few held graves, The Roots sites got a free query search form.

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    • Definately not in recent times (1700+). I can’t speak for middle ages or earlier, but there are net sites which deal with Stockton in these periods. On the 1899 map the area on which the primary school (OKA Portrack Infants and Juniors or St Ann’s) was later built was occupied by a claypit and allotments.

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    • No, it was further up Durham Road, towards Hardwick. I know that because the house I lived and grew up in was on the gated entrance into the cemetery, which house was haunted until early 1970’s when it was exorcised by the Archbishop of Canterbury .

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  40. I have discovered that my Great Grandparents – Edward and Elizabeth Johnson came to live in Stockton in 1906/07. They lived in several places: Bridge Street, Hibernia Street and Wilson Street to name a few. At one time Elizabeth had a Fish and Chip Shop but I don’t know where – this would have been around 1920’s. She also lived above and ran a loose salt distribution shop. Can ANYONE help identify where and when this could have been? There also is a book that one of my relatives used to have that had all residents in Thornaby, Stockton area in it but she cannot remember it’s title – does anyone have any ideas on this and if so where I can purchase/view one?

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  41. I’m the current owner of the building and would love to see other photos of Barries off license. Does anyone have any that they could post onto the site? If you would like to contact me directly, my email address is available through Picture Stockton.

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  42. With the recent sad news about HMV does anyone have any pictures of the original shop on the high street? I spent many a Saturday afternoon and most of my pocket money in there

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  43. I am interested in the history of 19 High Street, Norton Village. I was told it used to be the local police station. I would love to see images of the property over the years, its history as a shop would be good too. Can anyone help?

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  44. We would like to purchase images of Stockton for a dementia care home in Stockton can these images be purchased or could you point me in the correct direction for this. Thank you Angela.

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    • We would be happy to provide you with a copy of any image you request (assuming there are no copyright issues). The prints themselves are produced on quality photographic paper and are as close to A4 size as we can make them depending on the quality of the original image. We sell them for £5 each including postage. Please email us at pictures@stockton.gov.uk with the image titles and your address and we will send the images out to you. We will need a cheque to the value of £5 per image, made payable to Stockton Borough Council and sent to..

      Picture Stockton Team
      Stockton Central Library
      Church Road
      Stockton. TS18 1TU

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  45. One of your headers is part of a photo of four men holding what seem to be poles but are in fact oars and a boy (their cox). No more detail is given and I would very much like to know if anyone has any information on who this crew are and the exact name of the rowing club of which they were members – and indeed any information or material about rowing on the Tees at Stockton during the Victorian era… I came across the full version of this photo in Stockton Central library in a book called “Winds of Change – Entertainment in Stockton-on-tees 1793 – 1993” by Francis Gerard Owens. The photo titled “A Stockton Rowing Club at the turn of the Century”. Chris Kenyon – Tees Rowing Club Archivist.

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