18 thoughts on “Norton Road

  1. In my schooldays we had a ‘wrongun’ in the class. He would shoplift on a Saturday and he always started at Golightly’s. He used to say if he got out of that shop OK he was alright for the rest of the town. His motto was ‘Go Lightly’ and then he was OK.

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  2. Yes, I too remember Golightly`s shop very well. From 1937 until 1961 my father was manager of the Public Benefit repair factory, 15 Norton Rd, which was a couple of doors away from Golightly`s so, as chidren, my brothers and I were always in and out of there on Saturdays while we waited for our parents to finish work. Does anybody remember “glitterwax”? I recall buying it there to make wax flowers which we fastened on to twigs then put in a vase to adorn the sitting room!!
    I seem to remember in the 1960`s Golightly`s premises was taken over by a firm that sold fire damaged stock, I think it was called “Josephines”. We got some great bargains but even after washing you could always smell the smoke !

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  3. Does anybody know what has become of Maxwells corner now? I used to work in the building when it was Rawcliffes before it moved to Wellington Square and the building was magnificent (if a little delapitated). I go past it now and again and see that there seems to have been some changes on the first floor but im not sure if it has been converted into offices or flats. Any ideas?

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  4. Yes Stan I remember Golightly”s. I was never out of the place. My Grandparents lived in Nelson St and was sent to Golightly”s most day”s for they had the best selection of marbles and tops & whips in the town. They had rocking horses cowboy outfits toy guns and every other conceivable toy there was. A for-runner of Leslie Browns. It was situated opposite King St on the left a few shops down Norton Rd. I only wish that I had the presence of mind to invest in an old Brownie and photographed every street in Stockton as it was in the forties & fifties, What a collection that would have been. Happy day”s.

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  5. In Norton Road, a couple of doors down from Maxwell”s corner there used to be a toy shop called Golightly”s. I can remember going there with my mother in the 1940″s. Does anybody else remember it.

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  6. Does anyone remember an old hardware shop on the High Street opposite Maxwell’s about no 5 or 6 High Street, It was called something like old Vities. He used to sell kippers that hung in his window among the kettles and pans.

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  7. In the course of genealogical research I have come across John Peckston who appears in the 1901 census as a clothier and outfitter. He had four small sons (Robert, Cuthbert, Augustine and John) at the 1901 census and I would be interested in tracing any descendants. The family was, I think, Catholic. Family names included Vincent (John”s father was Vincent and he had a son who died aged 12 of that name) and Grant, deriving from his wife”s family of Middleton (and from her mother”s family of Robinson).

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    • Hello,
      Augustine (Austin) Peckston was my paternal grandfather. He and my grandmother, Dorothy, emigrated to New Zealand in the 1920’s. My father is their youngest son and was born here. He married Augustine’s secretary in the 1950s (both Catholic). I am one of their 5 children, brought up in Auckland where they both still live.

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      • Hello, Maree! I am the granddaughter of Winefride Peckston, Austin’s sister. I too am researching the family roots. Hope all your family are well. My brother, Robert, enjoyed his time out visiting you all several years ago as did my sister, Gabriel and niece, Rebecca.

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    • Hello, Rupert! I take it that you are from the Holderness area branch of the family, with that surname! John had three daughters, also and one of these was my grandmother.

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  8. This shows Peckston’s the “complete outfitter”. This was the predesessor of Maxwell’s who took over in about 1913, later becoming Rawcliffe’s who only recently moved to the Wellington Square Shopping Centre.

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