Bus on Stockton High Street, 1957

A general view of Nos.47-61, High Street, Stockton. No.47, Yorkshire Penny Bank (1932-present day), No.57, R. Pickersgill & Son, heating engineers and furnishing ironmongers, No.58, F.A. Woodroffe and Son, jewellery, silversmith, optician, watches and clocks, No.59, Masterman, menswear, No.60, Laesers, confectioners, No.61, The Vane Arms Hotel. A double decker bus is included in the view. 1957

97 thoughts on “Bus on Stockton High Street, 1957

  1. Willie Waites is no longer with us. I moved from Stanley Street to Roseworth in 1969 and ‘Billy’ lived in the same road with his mam. I sold gazettes and the ‘Sports’ for him in the High Street. From what I can remember Billy was a keen follower of local football – the Newtown Club team. He was a nice man.

    Like

  2. Hello Judith – The family lived in the upper floors of the property. Latterly, only Granny and Auntie Jessie remained. They employed a daily maid to do the housework. Auntie Jessie DID teach at Richard Hind School and, when she retired, served on Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council.

    Like

  3. Judith Wyman – sorry for late response (due to computer difficulties). No51 High Street was completely occupied by the firm. The shop was on th ground floor of the main building with single-storey workshops behind. The upper floors were residential. 1st floor = kitchen, large landing, pantry, toilet & large drawing room over shop (originally 2 rooms converted into one). 2nd floor = 3 bedrooms & bathroom. 3rd floor = more bedrooms. 4th floor = attic bedrooms & stores. There were also cellars which were used for storage (cold foods etc)

    Like

  4. I worked at Whitelocks 1970-72 – there was a Tom Walker worked there too. I remember getting the bus into Stockton from Middlesbrough every day then walking down Dovecot Street under the bridge to Tynedale Street – what a walk!! Collingwoods jewellers was on the corner of Dovecot Street then.

    Like

  5. My dad Eddie Daly was born at Portrack in the 1920s. He played for the Shamrocks in the 50s. He used to tell me about a man who dressed in a lion suit and walked down the High Street. That would be when he was a boy in the 20s or early thirties. Does anyone else remember anything about the lion man?

    Like

  6. Old Dickie Bradshaw who worked in the Head Wrightsons Machine Shop, Thornaby, was a great slinger – if his crane driver did not obey his instructions he would put his fist in the air & say ‘Next time you will get that’. I never saw a crane driver disobey him again in my twenty odd years, he certainly was good at his job but was fun to be around. Dickie had a son by the same name who was a good darts player.

    Like

      • Hi Katie, Just read your comment. My husband Malcolm asks to say hi to your dad Tony. They worked together at Whitelocks and Malcolm worked the door at the Fiesta in Norton While your dad worked the door at Tito’s.

        Like

  7. Bob it was the other way around. Oxbridge to the High Street then to the site off Durham Road on the road to Stillington. My nephew Richard Small worked for him for quite a number of years before going to OZ.

    Like

  8. I worked for ‘Whitelocks’/’DairyCrest’, Tynedale Street, Oxbridge in 1972/73 and there was a Tom Walker working there at the time. I believe he left in the 70s and set up a cheese retail business adjacent to The Sun public house. For some reason I also think he may have had premises close to The Speedway pub in Newport, Middlesbrough.

    Like

    • Tom was still there as the manager when I worked there from 1978 – 1980. His son Michael ran the yogurt warehouse. It was the mid eighties when I think he set up his own business which was located on a farm between Stillington and Thorpe Thewles.

      Like

  9. Dave, I remember Willy very well. I used to sell the Sports for him at the top of Parliment street on a Saturday evening. I would sell out, get paid, then go to the fish shop in Adderly street – fish and chips and a large bottle of Lowcocks Cream Soda – then home to watch ‘Holiday Town Parade’ them were the days. I don’t seem to remember Tarzan the tramp.

    Like

  10. Bob, it was may father who was the darts player (Dicky Bradshaw). I have heard lots of stories over the years about things he got up to playing darts. I have a program somewhere in my house when he was in the first News Of the World finals. 11/12/2011 18:54:31

    Like

  11. Joyce McDowell – Thanks for that, I can see the building now. It must have been four or five storeys high, did the business occupy the whole building? What were the upper floors used for? Fascinating, it would be great to see any interior photographs of the business if they exist.

    Like

  12. Judith – I don’t have any photographs of the shop on Norton Road. The High Street shop was no. 51. Look on the photograph of the High Street. Look above the back of the bus & you will see, high up, painted on the gable ‘H & W’ (Martin)

    Like

  13. Anon. The only sister that I know about is the one that married a gentleman called Tom Walker who runs a well known local Cheese company that was based in Stockton High Street but is now based just off the Durham Road.

    Like

  14. As well as a Wilf Mannion living in Portrack there was a Stanley Matthews who went to St Annes School & will be about seventy now. The real Stanley presented him with a pair of football boots in the Jubilee Hall one Saturday morning prior to Blackpool playing Middlesbrough at Ayersome Park.

    Like

  15. ‘Willie the Gazette Seller’ was Willie Waites. Willie lived in Bickersteth Street, or one of the streets in that area, and went to St. Cuthberts School in Parkfield. Willie was stricken as a child with Sydenham’s Chorea, known in those days as ‘Saint Vitus’ Dance’, and this sometimes may have given the impression that he was on the simple side, but he wasn’t; Willie had a very sharp mind. Willie was a well-known and well-liked character around Stockton High Street for many years. I hope he is still well.

    Like

  16. Ken Rhodes – Did the Wilf Mannion you refer to have a sister called Lilly? Were they both unmarried and did they live with their mother a very sweet old fashioned lady? If so I remember them from when they lived at Hardwick. Sadly I think they have all passed away now.

    Like

  17. Keith Bradshaw, was your g/father a really good darts player in the Stockton leagues? If so I can remember one New Years eve when visiting his house with friends who were friends of his when he offered to play anyone for a certain amount of money. He had the dart board on a wall in the kitchen. I knew of his ability and decided to keep my mouth shut.

    Like

  18. I remember Leslie Browns as somewhere we would spend Saturday afternoons listening to the current Top 20 records in little sound booths (and occasionally buying a record!!). The Penny Long ride which Keith Bradshaw mentioned was always popular as it went around the roads on the council estate behind Richardson Rd. As for Parkfield – the area I knew and played around with my mates seems to have mostly disappeared all, the Sts that ran down to Bousefield Lane have been pulled down apart from Gladstone St and Northcote St. The planners call it progress but it split lots of communities apart. The High St suffered the same fate when all the shops and pubs, including the Empire and the billiard hall where we spent many happy hours, were destroyed. I wonder if Keith remembers Tarzan the tramp and Willie the Gazette seller.

    Like

  19. When I served my time as an apprentice patternmaker at Pickerings Lifts in the late Forties I shared a bench with a nice man called Wilf Mannion who lived at St Annes Terrace in Portrack. In those days Wilf Mannion was a well known footballer with the Boro. I turned up, as we all did, at half past seven to start work for the first time and was told that I would be working with Wilf. I thought that my new workmates such as Albert Russell were pulling my leg, but no, at one minute past eight in rolled the bold Potrack Wilf, a little tubby man who was not a footballer but I think he supported the Boro as well as the Rocks. I worked with Wilf till I moved to Croswaites for a year and then onto Heads for the rest of my working life. Mr Wilf became a firm friend and we went to see many a classical music show together. Was he part of the Mannion family that Joy and the previous writer were taking about?

    Like

  20. Yes Billy cockles was real, we had many a good chase of him when I was young. I was brought up in Camden street and we use to always bump into him if we were going down the tips up Bowesfield Lane.

    Like

  21. I have just been catching up and reading comments about Stockton’s characters. I remember Mucky Arthur riding down Richardson Rd where I lived but have no idea how he got the name. Was Billy Cockels a real person? As teenagers we used to walk across the 6 fields from Hartburn to Tatie Hall then cross over and walk along some railway lines and end up on Bousefield Lane, on the way we used to pass a hut where Billy supposedly lived but we never saw him and I still don’t know if he ever existed. As fo Glovey or yellow gloves as we called him whenever we saw him we would shout ‘Up the Boro’ and he would respond with a string of four letter words!! Happy days wandering up and down the High St on a Sat afternoon. Was Miss Martin at Richard Hind juniors, if so I was terified of her.

    Like

  22. I remember Hunter Martin walking in the High Street in Stockton. He always wore a Derby bowler. I have in my possession an evening dress tail suit made by Hunter Martin. I also was taught by his sister, Miss Martin at school.

    Like

  23. I too have enjoyed the comments on the characters of Stockton and especially Kay’s comments. I only visited Portrack once a week, with my mother to see my grandparents but I remember seeing Giggy at the corner of Nicholson Street. To Linda Jackson regarding the Pinkney sisters – they were indeed the two ladies who taught Sunday School at Brunswick for many years. I recall attending there and being a ‘Morning Star’ and collecting money for the missionaries in Africa.

    Like

  24. Joyce McDowell, I wonder if the Pinkney sisters you speak of from the forties and fifties would be the same women who, in the sixties, taught me both at Sunday School and youth group in the Methodist church on Dovecot St. I remember them as lovely ladies and as I recall they lived just off Oxbridge Lane not too far from the cemetery.

    Like

  25. Joyce McDowell – what a lovely story about your family business. Do you have any photographs of the shop? I can remember it being on Norton Road but I don’t know where it was on the High Street.

    Like

  26. My Grandad, James Parker, played for the Portrack Shamrocks football team. I have a team photo somewhere in my archives. I too would love to know more about them. Great picture, such a shame they destroyed it. I remember someone telling me Carry Grant stayed at the Vane Arms.

    Like

  27. Take a ‘bow’ Stockton folk for all the lovely comments about Giggy, with working on the market I saw him often and what Kay Fiddess said above was really lovely, it goes to the very heart of the Stockton and Stockton folk we all care about.

    Like

  28. This picture brings back memories of, when a child, sitting in the bay windows above H and W Martin’s Tailors shop, watching the Mayor’s parade and many other parades during the war. My dad, Wallace, kept the business going whilst his brother, Hunter (Uncle Terry)was directed to the full time special police service during the War. Wallace died in 1943 and Hunter managed to keep the business going with the assistance of his wife, Elsie to keep the books. He had a loyal staff, in particular two tailoresses Gladys and Elsie Pinkney. When the High Street was redeveloped he moved the shop to Norton Road and kept going until these ladies were due to retire, producing one suit a week.

    Like

  29. Dave Day, you would get a shock if you saw the High Street now. There is no market running down the middle anymore, just a small market up near the town hall. No Les Browns, you must remember that shop. Any thing you want to know about Stockton or Parkfield, I will gladly fill you in on. Another memory – you must remember the Penny Long Ride.

    Like

  30. Thanks Keith. I have often wondered if Billy Cockles was real, I know we always ran past the hut just in case. I wonder if Stockton still has well known characters like there were in the fifties or whether everyone is just faceless these days. As I now live in Cheshire I haven’t seen the High Street for some years now.

    Like

  31. I think it’s a chap called Fairless who lived in that area, such a long time ago but I do remember a Dickie Bradshaw who was a slinger at Head Wrightsons machine shop, Teesdale works in 1953.

    Like

  32. One reason for Stockton Cricket Club having a Thursday XI organised by Tom Iredale the High Street tobacconist. The pitches they played on were usually at the Oxbridge Avenue side of the ground and most of the team did work on Saturdays and so could not particpate then. Pleasant days!

    Like

  33. I lived in Park Terrace until I was about 5 years old, when we moved to Roseworth. I don’t remember any names of the neighbours, apart from the Franks family who ran a taxi company.

    Like

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.