44 thoughts on “Richard Hind Secondary School

  1. Can I just say, once again, how pleased I am to see these pictures. I think that they are showing classes 3A and 5A, from 1957 and 59.

    Photographs of family member were quite a rarity, even in the 1950s, as few people had a camera. Even if you had one, it was an expensive and tiresome business having to take the films to a chemist in the town to get them printed.

    So school photographs were highly prized. However, in my case knowing how hard up was my mother, I never told her that the pictures of our class had been taken, to save her the worry about finding the money for them.

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  2. A comment by Ian Jack, in today’s Guardian (Nov 11th 2018), that although the end of WWI is a hundred years ago, and he is 76, there were teachers in his class in Glasgow, that had served in WWI, brought to mind that Mr Dee, our chemistry master, when I was at Richard Hind, was in that category too.

    Mr Dee made occasional references to his time in WWI, when I would guess he had been a junior officer. I think he said that all but one of his classmates had been killed.

    He refused to do any experiments to do any experiments involving chlorine, as it brought back the memory of poison gas warfare. Mr Dee was also pretty vituperative about Haber, whose name came up in the context of the Haber-Bosch process. This had been vital in keeping Germany in the war, as it was an essential link in the manufacture of explosives. Also Haber had been the driving force in the development of poison gases and was very proud of his “successes”.

    It is quite ironic that the foundation of ICI Billingham was its introduction of the Haber Bosch ammonia synthesis process.

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    • Fred if you look on the site mentioned earlier on this site you will find past copies of “The Stocktonian” the Grangefield Grammar and earlier Stockton Secondary School. The Stocktonian was published by the Old Boys Association (now alas defunct). There are several pictures and articles relating to Mr Dee and his year group. I think it was about 1911/12 but not sure.
      If you can’t find the site get in touch with the staff.
      Mr. Dee was certainly a lovely man and a good teacher. He was I understand gassed in WW I and consequently suffered all his life.

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  3. If you look down the bottom of the list you will find more things about Mr Bayliss. Sadly that he died around 2011.

    He joined the school in 1955, taking over from Rowntree, who regarded me as being too much of a science know-all, and made efforts to discourage me. I suspect my exam results surprised him. Mr Dee put him right, I have to say.

    One of the first thing that David Bayliss did was to buy the Van der Graff generator. This had only been invented in 1929, so he was obviously proud of it. The spark length was 30 cm equivalent to 300 thousand volts. The normal method generating static electricity at high voltage was through the Wimshurst machine. This is what we had at Stockton Grammar..

    I rather suspect that Mr Bayliss didn’t quite understand how the Van der Graff, and frankly I have always felt that basing the first lessons on the subject using static electricity is a big mistake

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    • In a later class run by Mr Heslop (Sloppy: escaped from Grangefield) the Van der Graff generator produced a spark that hit the bald bit uncovered by his comb-over. Tony Bell 1958-63

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  4. I’m also a former pupil of RH – left around 64 -65, I think. The teachers I remember are “Dickie” Bird (he used to take us Youth Hostelling & hiking), “Pa” Dee – chemistry I think (of “gangway here” fame but a nice man), Mr Baylss – physics (replaced by Mr Hislop, I think – he did an interesting experiment with a Van-dergraff generator – the static generated a big spark onto his head when he touched a water tap!), Mr Dunn (Technical Drawing – I really didn’t like him, he was not a very good teacher – got my own back on the last day of my final term), Mr Rosser – headmaster (again, I didn’t like him at all – got caned a number of times, but he wasn’t fair). I enjoyed my time there and went on to do quite well – despite having a stammer. Good old Richard Hind.
    Hung around with “Tubby” Armstrong, ? Blenkinsop, Gordon Danby – can’t remember any more – we called ourselves “The Men” – seems hilarious now!
    Would love to hear from any in my year.

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    • 64-65 that’s eleven years after I left. I thought there would not be many working years left with Pa Dee, he looked old then. Can’t believe he would still be there in 64-65. Also Rosser as you say unfair, he had his favourites.

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      • Sounds like Alexander Dumas, The Three Musketeers Twenty Years After. Twenty years after I left and the only name I know is Mr Rosser I cannot say he was unfair as it was usually deserved in my case, you were not supposed to question Teachers telling them they had got it wrong he could swing his cane though it never cured me of asking questions and drawing my own conclusions. Many years later my works Manager said, some day Frank you will take what I say without the pinch of salt.
        Mike we were the Musketeers for some reason I was always Athos, probably because I drank a lot of tea, fancy £3 a cup coffee had not been invented.
        I do believe Miss Duffney is still living in the area, the students pin up though we would never have dared mention that fact.
        Frank.

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      • Tony, yes I do now remember you – can’t remember your nickname though – as you say, mine was Colly. I also remember spending all night in your home just talking. What are you doing these days? I’m living in Devon now and loving it. Get in touch if you want my email address.
        Mike (Colly)

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        • Hi Colly, Blenkinsopp (Ed) here. I remember you and the “Men” what a hoot. Do you remember our ridiculous caving trips in your Dad’s car? Thinking about you recently with the focus on Joe Biden’s stammer. Are you still in Devon? I escaped Stockton by marrying a Devon gal and have spent most of my life in Exeter. I agree about Jonny Rosser and Tommy Dunn, there were others who get the thumbs down but others worth a thumbs up.

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          • Ed, I sure do remember you and those caving days – great fun. Also attempting the Pennine Way and getting your dad to pick us up – I think. Great days but totally crazy. So you were in Exeter – I was in Bampton, nr. Tiverton – now in SW Wales enjoying life. Generally good days at RH.

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            • Well that’s a bit of a nuisance. In normal times we are in South Wales occasionally heading to Pembrokeshire. If you fancy revisiting those crazy caving days perhaps we could find a pub.

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  5. I was at Richard Hind from 1942-44. The teachers at that time were mostly brought back from their retirement. At that time we only had half day schooling. I can remember a few names. There was Sandy Dobin, Art and Woodwork. Mr Charlton, Science. Mr Barber, maths and one name I shall never forget was Mr Rosset who, for some reason took an abject delight by caning me. Miss Westmacott taught French and Miss Duffey English and Music. Some ot the names of lads in my class were Woodhead, Ingram and Metcalfe.
    On leaving the War was still going on and I worked as a very poorly paid clerk for 7/6 a week. From the on I served as an Air Traffic Controller for some thirty years. I wish any survivors good health and some happiness…

    Tony Johnson

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    • I was there from 1949 till 1953. When I started there Mr Charlton was still there, maybe part time, can’t remember. He was the physics master. Mr Rosser liked using the cane. He had his favourites who would never see his office, didn’t care for him at all.

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      • Bob, Mr Charlton was a Gentleman although H&S would certainly disapprove of his teaching today. He blew things up made stink bombs and taught us all how to make gun powder and our own fire works. We would file all the different metals to fine powder to make the different colours. When it was snowing he showed us how to make ice cream without a freezer with a custard base, we lads loved him.

        The half day school ended in 1940 after Air raid shelters were rushed up and they realised the Germans would not be coming in daylight to bomb us all to oblivion.
        In 1941 Mr Webster was Head Master another Gentleman who retired shortly after I started, I was in the choir we walked down Hartburn Lane to his house and sang Carols for him that Christmas, we were treated to mince pies and lemonade.

        We then got Mr Rawlings for two years he used the cane sparingly on those who deserved it, why me I asked, because you question everything he replied, Teachers know best. No they don’t quoth he who had read Arthur Mee’s Encyclopedias cover to cover. Oh well take it like a man?

        Mr Rosser was a shock to some as you got it whether a trouble maker or not. In my by-weekly visits to his office I also discovered he had no sense of humour. Why are you here Mee again, Sir I threw a board rubber at Mr Plummer (you always told the truth no point in fudging), why, he threw it at me, why, because he was throwing it at some one else and missed, Sir if he was William Tell I would not stand there with an apple on my head, his mouth never even twitched, bend over.

        I Blessed all those teachers at Richard Hind, their teaching gave me a good life, I too left at Christmas 1944 and went into Engineering, from there it was always upwards and onwards all thanks to RH.
        Frank.

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  6. I attended RH during the years of 1960 to 1965. Anybody have any Photo`s to share – I would love to see.
    In 1974 I left the UK and went to Canada working on Oil Rig construction and have just Retired [in China] after many wonderful years in the Marine Industry. I can still remember the great times spent in the Metal Working classes at RH
    Love to hear from Old Classmates.

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    • Hi Pete, We were in the same year along with Malcolm Hall, Ian Walker Tows, Ricky Dyke et al. There are class photos on the web sites for 4a and 4b We all used to get together I the Fairfield when we left and got our Lambrettas
      Would love to get in touch
      Al Jones

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  7. Dealing with the top photo, in which Smiler Gibson was the form master. Brian Burns and Geoff Burns (no relation) are at the left hand end of the second row. Both of them went on to do science at Stockton Grammar, in 1959, when it was at the top of Garbutt Street. Richard Hind, as a technical school, intended to help provide skilled craftsman and technicians for the professions, did not have a sixth form, and the idea of any of us going to University was never even thought about.

    The best example of this philosophy, I can give is that in the art class we were taught how to draw and paint, learning the rules of perspective and shading. This would have been vital for anyone who want to become a commercial artist. Similarly we had very good woodwork and metalwork teachers which would have give anyone so inclined an easy route into apprenticeships.

    It was the more academic lot who went on to the sixth form, and I also went on to Stockton Grammar.

    Derek Graham who was extremely bright, but never bothered to show it, could have gone onto doing science, but opted to go Grangefield Grammar, where I think he wanted to specialise in languages. Derek is on the right hand end of the second row.

    I too was sorry to hear about Mr Bayliss

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    • Yes Fred Richard Hind was the School that made many future engineers in the local industries. In my time 1940 late -44 the classes ran in tandem Academic and Technical not that you could tell as the curriculum was very similar, the difference being my class through the years started at 18 pupils and ended with 14 pupils as against up to thirty in the other forms. It meant we in the “T” classes got almost one to one tuition and it showed in the high mark passes in exams.
      At the end of my Schooling we were allowed to go out and visit factories who had written in asking for apprentices to a variety of work, the war was showing signs of ending and they wanted people they could train for future management roles.
      Visiting a factory with John Hunter who had the application letter Arthur Brown after a lot of persuasion managed to get me to take one such apprenticeship, john Hunter went into the wire works and worked there until he retired as Foreman.
      I had other ideas and joined the army taking advantage of the excellent education facilities they offered went up through the ranks. On leaving I joined ICI who gave me even more training including 26 weeks at Middlesbrough College reading metallurgy so snap Fred.
      We did not suffer teacher shortages during the war, some of the Girls School Teachers came to our side and many were WW1 ex- forces so would be retired by the time you went to RH, although I think you had the last Head Master we had Mr Rosser. I noticed the hair styles in the pictures certainly would not have been allowed in our time, short back and sides only, anything showing outside the cap we wore at all times apart from in class would have got us talked about.
      A brilliant school still talked about by those who were educated so well there, it gave me all I have now in my comfortable retirement.

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    • Sorry to disappoint you Fred but I was a duffer at science having dropped physics in Y4 but managed to pass GCE Chemistry. I went to Grangefield, did A levels and then Teacher Training College. Finally taught for 42 years all told. However I share your sentiments about Richard Hind being a school for potential draughtsmen, engineers and scientists. They were good times.

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  8. I heard that John Calder had passed away a year or so ago in Egypt. He and I went on to Grangefield to do “A” levels, he then went on to Uni. to study Architecture.

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  9. J.K Wood was my father. He passed away October 22, 2008 of ALS. I am so glad I found this website as I have been trying to learn more about his childhood so I can speak about him at my wedding. If anyone has any information about my father I would be grateful.

    Thank you
    Tammie

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    • Tammie -so sorry to hear the sad news about your father.
      I was his best friend during our time at school but lost track of him when he went abroad (Canada?). I have often wondered how things turned out for him and also the rest of the family (Christine and Stephen?)
      We spent a lot of time together both at and outside of school.
      Please contact me so that we can discuss further – email pictures@stockton for my email and/or phone number.
      Best Regards
      Alick Smith

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      • Mr. Smith, I am just seeing this now as the notification must have gone into my spam inbox. Wow! Thank you for replying. I can be reached at tkai13@live.com. Stephen is alive and well living in Kirkland Quebec. He is the C.E.O of Montreal Hydro. Christine passed away in May of 2018. If you send me your facebook link I can connect you. My Uncle Stephen remembers you visiting at his house and playing tennis with my dad. Thank you for reaching out to me, it meant everything!

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  10. Sorry to hear about Mr. Bayliss, he was Physics teacher taking over from Mr. Rowtree in the middle 50’s. He was our Form Master in the photo. Most of us in the photo will now be 70ish.

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  11. Very sad news, he was my science teacher at the Bassey for 5 years, then my officer in the ROC for a few more. It was very strange to go from calling him Sir and then to Dave but he told me don’t worry you’ve left school you can call me what you like ! As long as it isn’t rude, I could never be rude about Dave, condolences to his family.

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  12. Top photo front – row L to R George Pinder, Harry Hollifield, 9th Keith Wheelhouse. Middle-row L to R, 3rd D Moore, 4th Norman Howells, 9th David Metcalf. Back-row L to R 4th Mick Stockdale,5th Norman Emmerson, on the right Alec Smith. Bottom photo front-row left Michael Rowntree & right Tommy(Totter) Keenan.

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  13. ‘Smiler’ Gibson was Form Master for my year in both 1965 (4a) and 1966 (5a), the year of his retirement. I believe he retired to Brampton to run the local Post Office. I do not know whether this was the Brampton in Cumbria or one of the many others throughout the UK.

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  14. This was the 2nd time Mr Gibson was a teacher at RH. He started his 2nd stint in probably 1951-52 year. Before that he taught my B-in-L who is 19 yrs older than me, so that would be between 1931-36.

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  15. ‘Smiler’ Gibson, the teacher, with spectacles in the top picture was nicknamed as such, since he hardly ever smiled. I think this was because most of his front teeth were quite blackened, and he did not like to show them. He was however a first class history teacher and well respected by everyone.

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  16. Does anybody have photographs of Arthur Head School football teams in fifties when we won the Salter Cup in 55 and Salmon Cup in 57/58?

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  17. Does anyone have photographs of Richard Hind boys from 1937 to 1941 when I was a pupil. I am now 83 and would like to see some from my era.

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  18. I went to Richard Hind School from 1955 to 1960, Miss Gwen Carr was the headmistress and always wore her graduation gown. Miss Cannon took Art, Miss Mabbett took Geography, Mrs Vosniak took French (she was Polish), Miss Betts took Maths, she lived across the road from the school. We had to go to Ropner Park to play hockey and tennis, and walk each day to the dinner huts at Oxbridge for lunch. Uniform rules were very strict especially length of skirt, always wearing a beret and not eating in the street in school uniform. Somewhat diferent from today, mores the pity !

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  19. Mr Bayliss joined Richard Hind when I was in the third year, which would have been 1956. I believe that Mr Bayliss had worked in industry and it showed. He was always encouraging the boys to take an interest in practical things. This led to an incident which could have resulted in him getting the sack and me expelled. What happened was he got to know I was interested in aeronautics and somehow the idea of building a wind tunnel was suggested. It was to be an after-school activity. We ( I think, Georgie Pinder and me) built one out of a baked bean tin and Meccanno. To make it more powerful, Mr Bayliss supplied us with a 0.5kW electric motor. The coils on the motor were exposed, and I noticed that when they were touched with a screwdriver, a big spark resulted. The motor looked and was lethal One evening, when Mr Bayliss had gone home, I was showing off the “spark effect”, when all the lights in the Physics and Technical Drawing blocks fused. We had no idea what to do, and I left for home almost in tears, wondering what was going to happen.The next morning I got in early, only to see Mr Bayliss busying himself around in the Physics/TD Block. A few minutes afterward, the lights came back on. I was asked no questions, and nothing more was heard of the matter, but that was the last of the wind tunnel experiments! I would just like to add, that although I did my degree in metallurgy, I continued to be interested in things to do with aircraft, aerodynamnics and aircraft engine design. As a result, one of the last R&D projects I did was to design a closed-cycle gas-turbine system. This ran in 1991 at a British Gas site in the Midlands. Because the gas turbine needed a high temperature casing we were recommended to get this done by Stockton Foundries in Ross Road, Portrack. They did an extremely good job.

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  20. Mr Bayliss is the teacher in the photo and I think he was replaced by N Bird, an Irish man who also took PE. Is the Alan Rowbotham above my adversary in the Metalwork Class from about 1959 to 1962? I now live in Australia and would like to hear from you if possible.

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  21. Can”t quite remember the name of the second form master, but he was a relatively new Physics teacher towards 1956/57. Took over from “Cocoa” Rowntree.

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  22. On the back of one of these photos are the signatures of those in the photo signed in what was then fashionable green ink. These are N.Emmerson JRichards N.Briscoe Alan Peers G.Pinder.K.Smith R.Tyreman F H Kirtley D Graham Harry Hollifield T Keenan Michael Harris Norman Howells I.Dickinson Leslie Instone T.Cairney Barry Todd M.Rowentree Brian Burns F.Starr David Southcott D.Moore David Metcalfe J.Calder J.K.Wood A.E.Smith K.Walker S.Smith K.Stokeld Peter Swales G.Burns John Atkinson. Can”t remember the name of the teacher in the second one but “SmilerGibson” is form master in the first one. Back row in both Fred!

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    • Unfortunately David Bayliss from Thornaby passed away recently. A great teacher dearly missed by all the family and friends. 87 years, ROC officer, Head of year and Church member. God bless him and his dearest wife June Bayliss who passed away close to him. With love, Leonie Burton (Bayliss) Lee Burton, and his grandsons Linden Burton and Josiah Burton.

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