237 thoughts on “Haverton Hill and Port Clarence War Memorial

  1. Although hostilities in the Great War ceased at 11 A.M. on 11th November 1918 men would continue to die on active service. Thomas Shute died 12 December 1918. He is commemorated on this memorial and is buried in Charleroi Communal Cemetery, Belgium. The cemetery contains the bodies of 279 soldiers who died after the armistice. Right up to April 1919.
    Thomas Shute was born at Middlesbrough in 1891. By 1911 he had married Mary Kelly from Haverton Hill and was living at Oak Street , Haverton Hill. He worked at Dorman & Long, Port Clarence. In 1912 they had a son, William. Thomas Shute must have volunteered early in the war as by July 1915 he was serving with the Royal Field Artillery in France. Thomas had another son, Thomas, in 1918. He may not have met this son.
    In December 1918 Thomas Shute was a driver with the 93rd Brigade Ammunition Column, Royal Field Artillery.Through accident or illness he died in the 20th Casualty Clearing Station at Charleroi.
    At the time of his death his parents, William & Mary Shute also lived at Haverton Hill (4 Cottage Street)

    Like

  2. There is a G Brooks listed among the men who died during the Great War, commemorated on this memorial. The closest candidate I have found is Corporal. 9216. George Brooks.
    George Brooks was born at Spittlegate, near Lincoln in 1893. In 1911 he enlisted with the Lincolnshire regiment at Grantham. When the war broke out his regiment was serving in Bermuda. By November 1914 they had disembarked in France. George suffered a bout of illness and was wounded on two seperate occasions. He was shipped back to England for treatment each time but returned to the front once fit. At the beginning of April 1917 he joined the 6th battalion of the Lincolnshire Regiment.
    The 6th Lincolnshire Regiment were part of the 11th Northern Division. As part of this division on 6 November 1918 they took part in what is now known as the Passage of the Grand Honelle. They were ordered to cross the Grand Honelle river in Belgium and capture the railway line at Bois D’ Angre. The Germans had set up defensive positions on the railway embankment. This led to heavy casualties from machine gun fire & bombing. George Brooks would be killed on 6 November 1918. Today he lies in Valenciennes (St. Roch) Communal Cemetery, France.
    He left a widow, Margaret Brooks. In November 1918 she was living at North Wharf street, Port Clarence. She later lived at 19 Cowpen Street, Port Clarence. I haven’t been able to find out why the widow of a soldier from Lincolnshire was living at Port Clarence. As his next of kin it seems likely she would have put his name forward when the decision to erect a memorial was taken.

    Like

  3. There are two entries on this memorial, which are included amongst those who died during the Great War, for the surname Waller. These are A. Waller & A.A. Waller.
    A.A. Waller is Lance corporal. 193. Arthur Appleton Waller. Durham Light Infantry (18th battalion). Killed in Action 3 March 1917. The other I believe is Private. 76586. Alfred James Waller. Manchester Regiment (12th battalion). Died 20 October 1918.
    Alfred James Waller was born 1898 in Welbury, Yorkshire. By 1911 he was living with his parents, Francis Robert & Mary Jane Waller, and siblings, at Saltholme near Cowpen Bewley. Francis Robert Waller was a farm labourer. Alfred James Waller is recorded as having died of sickness. He is buried in Rocquiny-Equancourt Road British Cemetery at Manacourt, France. This cemetery was used in October & November 1918 by the 3rd Canadian & British 18th Casualty Clearing Stations.
    Francis Robert & Mary Jane later lived at Wilton Grange, Redcar. Private. 76586. Alfred James Waller. Manchester Regiment. Is listed in the weekly casualty lists (17 December 1918) as being from Haverton Hill.

    Like

    • Just a correction on this information. It is Port Clarence that is the location given in the Weekly Casualty List not Haverton Hill.

      Like

  4. Gunner George William Wood Served with the Royal Field Artillery during the Great War. He enlisted in September 1914 but was held in reserve until October 1915 when he was sent to France with the 50th Brigade Royal Field Artillery. By May 1918 he had been posted to the 87th Brigade Royal Field Artillery. The 87th Brigade were part of the 19th Army Division. In October 1918 they were in positions East of Cambrai, France. They participated in the Battle Of The Selle (17-25 October). On 30 October 1918 they were near the village of St Martin, France. German artillery was active in this area. George William Wood was Killed on this day. Most probably as a result of a German shell. He is buried in Bermerain Communal Cemetery.
    George William wood was born at Wolviston in 1895. By 1901 he was living with his parents, William & Lily Wood at Belasis, Billingham. Lily died in 1901. Georges Father remarried in 1905 to Ann (Metcalfe?). By 1911 the family were living at Pearl Street, Haverton Hill. George worked at the nearby Casebourne Cement works. On enlistment he gave his profession as crane driver.

    Like

  5. Gunner Frank Oakes is commemorated on this memorial. He served with the Royal Field Artillery (1st Brigade). In October 1918 they were part of the British forces at Salonika in Greece. Frank died on 25 October 1918. There were few battles during the conflict here and diseases like malaria were rife. It is probable that Frank died of disease. He is buried in Mikra British cemetery, Kalmaria, Greece.
    Frank Oakes was born in 1890 at either Winsford or Over in Cheshire. His parents, Reuben & Margaret Oakes moved to Haverton Hill some time after 1903 to find work in the salt industry. In 1911 they were living at Ash Street, Haverton Hill. I’m not sure if Frank lived in Haverton Hill (he enlisted at Thornaby). His next of kin is recorded as his mother, Margaret A Hallmark. Margaret Oakes remarried in 1916 to a Felix Hallmark.
    Frank’s brother, Charles Oakes, is also listed on this memorial. he died in northern France on 11th April 1918.

    Like

  6. Frank Newby Helm was born in Haverton Hill in 1898. He lived with his parents, Charles & Janet Helm at Young street, Haverton Hill. He served in the Great War with the Yorkshire Regiment (9th battalion). In October 1918 his battalion took part in the Battle of the Selle (17-25 October 1918). He would be wounded East of Le Cateau, France and eventually died at the 20th Casualty Clearing station at Bohain. Today his body lies in Premont British Cemetery, France. He is also commemorated on this memorial.
    During October 1918 the Yorkshire Regiment (9th battalion) suffered 66 killed, 371 wounded & 47 missing.

    Like

    • Early on in the war it was realised that the wounds caused by modern artillery & machine guns would be fatal in a high number of cases unless medical treatment could be given on/or as close to the battlefield as possible. A chain of evacuation was devised which would take a wounded soldier from the battlefield to a permanent Base Hospital.
      This started with the regimental stretcher bearers who, unarmed, followed the soldiers onto the battlefield. Their role was to stem blood loss with field dressings and give morphine where necessary. They would then carry the wounded, often under enemy fire to the Regimental Aid Post, which would be sited in a dugout metres behind the front line. Here the Regimental Medical Officer would assess the wounded, check dressings, give treatment to prevent shock, set fractures and attach a Field Medical Card to the soldiers uniform. The card would remain with the soldier for the rest of his journey, being added to as his treatment progressed. Stretcher bearers from the Field Ambulance would then move casualties to one of their Dressing Stations.
      The Field Ambulance wasn’t an ambulance in the modern sense but was a medical unit of over 200 men, comprising doctors, medical officers, orderlies and a transport division of the Army Service Corps. Their job was to try and stabilise & monitor the wounded in preparation for more complex treatment at the Casualty Clearing Station.
      Casualty Clearing Stations were mobile hospitals, which moved according the progress of the front line. Non urgent casualties were provided with food and rest before being moved on to a Base Hospital. Those in urgent need of treatment had there uniform cut away and were washed and prepared for surgery.
      Frank Newby Helm survived as far as this stage of his evacuation, reaching the 20th Casualty Clearing Station at Bohain. There is no way of knowing what injuries he had suffered. Many patients were to ill to face surgery and were admitted to a resuscitation ward where they were warmed infused or transfused. Others beyond help were placed in the moribund ward awaiting death. Here nurses would see to the wishes of those still conscious, writing final letters to loved ones.
      Despite the courageous help of all those involved Frank Newby Helm died on 25 October 1918. Hopefully he was able to get a final message to his loved ones.

      Like

  7. Able Seaman Ernest Robson Smith is commemorated on this memorial. He was born at West Hartlepool and was the son of Charles Edward & Mary Smith. He enlisted in the Royal Navy prior to the First World War. In 1911 he was serving on the battleship HMS Victorious. By October 1918 he was serving on the submarine K.10, which was based at Scapa Flow in Scotland as part of the 3rd submarine flotilla. It was here on 23 October 1918 that he was tragically drowned. His body was buried in Seafield Cemetery, Leith, Scotland. At this time his mother Mary was living at Clarence Street, Haverton Hill.
    Some records link him to HMS Crescent. This was a depot ship at Scapa Flow. I don`t know the circumstances of his death, it may have happened when boarding HMS Crescent. Ernest Robson Smith was five days short of his 26th birthday.

    Like

  8. Private Matthew Connolly (Connelly) is commemorated on this memorial. He was born in Port Clarence in 1896. Matthew lived at Cowpen Street, Port Clarence with his parents, John & Catherine Connolly. He served with the Yorkshire Regiment (4th battalion) during the Great War. Matthew died on 22nd September 1918 whilst a German prisoner of war.
    In March 1918 the Germans had launched an offensive on the Somme aimed at splitting the British and French armies. Their goal was to win the war before American reinforcements arrived. The Germans advanced rapidly capturing many British soldiers. The Yorkshire Regiment (4th battalion) fought near Peronne as part of the 150th Brigade with the British 50th Division. During the month of March 1918 one hundred and sixty eight men of the 4th Yorks were listed as missing. Matthew Connolly was one of these.
    Following his death he was buried in a German cemetery. In 1923 his body was removed to the Sedan-Tourcy French National cemetery. The cemetery contains 747 French graves and the graves of 36 Commonwealth soldiers from World War One.

    Like

  9. Private James Sankey is commemorated on this memorial. He served with the East Yorkshire Regiment (11th battalion). On 8 September 1918, as part of the 92nd Infantry Brigade, they launched an attack on German positions by the River Warnave, south of Ploegsteert, Belgium. The regiment suffered heavy casualties. Among those killed was James Sankey. He was 18 years old and is buried in Trois Arbres Cemetery, Steenwerck, France.
    James was born in Haverton Hill. The youngest of nine children born to James & Sarah Sankey . His parents were originally from Droitwich, Worcestershire. Sarah Sankey died in 1901. By 1911 the family were living at 25 Oak Street, Haverton Hill. In 1914 James’s father also died. The register of soldiers effects records his brothers, John & George, and sisters, Charlotte Harrison, Sarah Aldsworth & Margaret Sankey as his next of kin.

    Like

  10. Joseph Thomas Monaghan was born in Port Clarence in 1893. Prior to the Great War he lived with his parents, Joseph and Mary Monaghan at Saltholme Terrace, Port Clarence Terrace. He was employed as a moulder at an iron foundry. On 3 September 1914 he enlisted in the army serving with the Royal Engineers (80th Field company). His company were part of the 18th Division and embarked in France in July 1915. By June 1918 they were in front line positions on the Somme, near the town of Albert. Among the many tasks they performed was making barbed wire concentrations. On 20 June 1918 Joseph was killed in action, most probably by shell fire.
    His name is on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial. His body was laid to rest in the Contay British Cemetery, France.

    Like

  11. Thomas Nichols Archer served with the Yorkshire Regiment (12th battalion) during the Great war. This battalion was known as the Teesside Pioneers. He disembarked with the regiment, in France, in August 1915. The battalion served on the Western front until 5 May 1918, when it was broken up and its soldiers sent to the base depot at Calais.
    Thomas Nichols Archer died in France on 17 June 1918. He is buried in Etaples Military Cemetery and is commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial. I`m uncertain of his cause of death as his battalion were at a base depot. The battalion had many wounded prior to being broken up and Etaples, which is south of Calais, had a large hospital. He may have been wounded in action.
    Thomas was 38 when he died. Born in Middlesbrough, by 1911 he was living with his parents, John Jones Archer & Harriet Ann Archer at Clarence Street, Haverton Hill. Prior to the war Thomas was a bricklayer at the salt works.

    Like

  12. Among those, who died during the Great War, listed on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial, is W Fleet. I can`t confirm the person 100% but a likely individual, is Private. 22696. Walter Fleet, who served with the Yorkshire Regiment (4th battalion). Today marks the centenary of his death in action.
    Walter was born in Greatham in 1890. His parents, Richard & Hannah Fleet, had moved from Cheshire to work in the salt industry. After living at Greatham, by 1901 the family were living at Pearl street, Haverton Hill. The difficulty in linking Walter Fleet definitely to this memorial is that the family had a number of addresses over time. By 1911 Richard & Hannah Fleet had moved back to Greatham. Walter had left the family home and in 1914 married an Ada Walker in Teesdale. His address when he joined up was in Barnard Castle. I do not have an address linking them to Haverton Hill for the time when names would have been put forward for the memorial.
    Walter Fleet would be killed in action on 27 May 1918, during the first day of the Third Battle of Aisne. The German army had launched an assault on the British and French armies. The Yorkshire Regiment (4th battalion) were in front line trenches near the village of Craonne, North East of Soissons, France, when they were over run by the Germans. 87 men of the battalion were killed on this day. Among them was Walter Fleet. He has no known grave and along with over 50 other missing men of the battalion, killed on 27 May 1918, is listed on the Soissons War Memorial.

    Like

  13. Joseph Duncan was born and raised in Middlesbrough. In 1901 he married Jenny Howson. By 1911 they were living with their five children at Cowpen Road, Haverton Hill. Joseph was an Engineer in the Iron works. In April 1916 he joined the Royal Navy as an engine room articifer. He served on the armoured cruiser HMS Antrim, during 1917, and after time being shore based, joined the Royal Navy sloop HMS Rhododendron in February 1918.
    Rhododendron was a Q ship. These ships outwardly looked like merchant ships but carried hidden armament. In the times of unrestricted submarine warfare there role was to entrap and destroy German submarines. Unfortunately on 5 May 1918 it would be HMS Rhododendron which would become the victim.
    Whilst on patrol North of the Orkney Isles she was torpedoed by the German U- boat U-70. Four of her crew were killed in this initial explosion. The sloop was designed to take a lot of damage before sinking and the usual plan was for a panic party to be sent out from the ship in an attempt to fool the submarine into surfacing to finish off the victim with its deck gun. The sloop would then reveal their gun and engage the submarine. However the commander of HMS Rhododendron decided to abandon the ship. The Germans fired several shells into the sloop and she eventually sunk. A further eleven sailors drowned. Joseph Duncan was among the fifteen victims of this action. He was 37 years old.
    Joseph Duncan is commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial and the Chatham Naval Memorial.

    Like

  14. The name of John Fox. Private. 13065. Durham light infantry (2nd battalion), killed in action 30 May 1918, is inscribed on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial.
    John Fox had enlisted on 28 August 1914 at Middlesbrough. At this time he was a blast furnace labourer living at Cowpen street, Port Clarence. He was born in Port Clarence in 1891 to Frank & Rose Fox. John landed in France with his regiment in January 1915. At the end of December 1915 he was attached for duty at Bell Brothers Clarence Iron works, Middlesbrough. This was probably due to the fact that such high numbers of men had volunteered for military service when the war broke out that it left a shortage of workers in many industries. In 1917 john Fox married Margaret Collins and in the same year they had a child, Francis. John was recalled to his regiment in 1918 and was posted to France at the end of March 1918.
    The Durham Light Infantry (2nd battalion) had suffered heavy casualties at Morchies, France on 21 March 1918. 28 officers & 571 other ranks were killed, captured or wounded. John was part of a new draft of men to the battalion. On 30 May 1918 the battalion was West of Poperinghe, Belgium. They were subjected to heavy shell & a gas bombardment. John Fox would be killed during this. He is buried in Belgian Battery Corner Cemetery.

    Like

    • John Fox was killed in action with the Durham Light Infantry (2nd battalion), West of Poperinghe, on 30 April 1918. Not May. Apologies for the error.

      Like

  15. Gunner 96113 James William Bradburn served with the Royal Field Artillery (51st Brigade). He was killed in action on 25 April 1918 at Dickebusch, Belgium. His name and that of his brother, Peter Bradburn are commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial.
    James William Bradburn was born in Haverton Hill, circa 1895, to Peter & Mary Alice Bradburn. His parents had moved from Cheshire to Haverton Hill around 1892 to work in the salt industry. In 1911 the family were living at 37 Victoria Terrace, Port Clarence. James William was working in an iron foundry. He was an early volunteer in the war. Disembarking in France with his regiment on 12 May 1915. In April 1918 the R.F.A. 51st brigade were covering the 26th & 64th Infantry Brigades at Dickebusch, South West of Ypres, Belgium. Upon his death James Williams effects were past on to his brother Joseph Bradburn. There mother Mary Alice had died in 1906 and there father Peter in 1912. James William is buried in Voormezeele, Enclosure No.3 Cemetery.
    Peter Bradburn was killed in action on 29 September 1915 whilst serving with the Grenadier Guards.

    Like

    • Peter Bradburn was born in Winsford, Cheshire circa 1887. Prior to joining up he worked as a hairdresser. He served with the Grenadier Guards (1st battalion), embarking in France in March 1915. On 29 September 1915 the 1st battalion were at Loos. They had taken part in the Battle of Loos, as part of the 3rd Guards Division. Peter would lose his life and has no known grave. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial.
      His brother, Joseph Bradburn, who was living at Ash Street, Haverton Hill was given as his next of kin.

      Like

  16. Among those commemorated on this memorial who died during the Great War are twin brothers Joseph & Stephen Tulip.
    They were born in Port Clarence in 1881 to William & Margaret Tulip. William was a weigh man at the iron works. They lived at 22 New Cottages, Port Clarence. In 1900 Joseph and Stephen enlisted with the Durham Light Infantry, perhaps to serve in the Boer War. They were together at Tournay barracks, Farnborough on the 1901 census. Joseph would remain in the army and by 1911 was with the 1st Durham Light Infantry in India. Stephen left at some stage and may have suffered an illness or accident as in 1911 he was a patient in the Ropner Convalescent Home at Middleton St George. When the Great war broke out both would see service on the Western Front.
    Stephen was a private in the East Yorkshire Regiment (1st battalion). He disembarked with the Regiment in France on 28 April 1915. By June 1916 they were in front line trenches at Ville. Stephen would be killed on 4 June 1916 during a German artillery bombardment.
    The 1st Durham Light infantry remained in India during the war but Joseph Tulip, by now a sergeant, must have requested to be posted to France. He would disembark with the 2nd Durham Light Infantry on 24 August 1915. In 1916 a specialist corps, the Machine Gun corps, was formed. Joseph transferred to the corps. By 1918 he was serving with the Machine Gun Corps in Palestine. On 22 April 1918 he died in Nasrieh Schools Military Hospital in Cairo, Egypt.
    The brothers are now buried on seperate continents. Stephen lies in Norfolk Cemetery, Bercordel-Bercourt and Joseph lies in Cairo War Memorial Cemetery. By the time of their sons deaths William & Margaret Tulip were living at Temperance Street, Haverton Hill. Sadly neither of them would live to see the monument. William & Margaret died within months of each other in 1921.
    On the register of soldiers effects Stephen gave his next of kin as Isabella Scotchbrook. This was their sister Isabella who had married a George Scotchbrook. In 1911 they were living with Georges parents in Temperance Street, Haverton Hill. Isabella Scotchbrook died in 1963.

    Like

  17. Sergeant Charles Oakes served with Yorkshire Regiment (12th battalion), known as the Teesside Pioneers. During the Lys offensive (7-29 April 1918) a number of companies of the 12th battalion were ordered to take up arms against the attacking Germans near Bac St Maor, Northern France. Charles Oakes was wounded and subsequently died on 11th April 1918. He is buried in La Kreule Military cemetery, Hazebrouck. The cemetery was originally set up by the 1st & 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Stations.
    Charles was born in 1894 in Winsford, Cheshire. His mother Margaret Ann was originally from Port Clarence or Haverton Hill. In 1888 she married Reuben Oakes they had twelve children in Winsford before moving to this area some time after 1903 to work in the salt industry. In 1911 the family were living at 40 Ash Street, Haverton Hill. In 1916 Margaret Ann Oakes remarried to a Felix Hallmark. In the register of soldiers effects Margaret A Hallmark was listed as Charles` next of kin and mother.
    Charles is commemorated on the Haverton Hill and Port Clarence War Memorial and the Middlesbrough war Memorial. As is his brother Frank Oakes, who was to be killed in action on 25th October 1918.

    Like

  18. Private Joseph Maddock was killed in action during operation Michael. He served with the East Yorkshire Regiment ( 7th battalion). on 31 March 1918 the battalion was in the front line near Selnis, in the southern sector of operation Michael. At 5.30 A.M they were ordered to attack German positions.They achieved there objective but were forced to fall back. Joseph Maddock would be killed and has no known grave. He is commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial and the Arras War memorial.Between the 21st & 31st march 1918 the East Yorks. (7th battalion) casualties were 19 officers and 400 other ranks.
    Joseph Maddock was born in 1895 in Haverton Hill. His parents, Adam & Mary Maddock, had moved to Haverton Hill from Cheshire in 1890 to work in the salt industry. They originally lived in Ash street, Haverton Hill before moving to Saltholme Terrace, Port Clarence. Joseph worked in the steel works in 1911. In 1915 he married Elizabeth Mohan, in Middlesbrough. They had a daughter, Florence, in 1916. His widows address was given as Horsfield Street, Middlesbrough.

    Like

  19. Private George Heatley was killed in action on 29 March 1918, during operation Michael. He served with the 18th Hussars. On 29 March his regiment was with American engineers in front line trenches near Villers Brettonneux. George Heatley had the misfortune to be the 18th Hussars` only fatality on this day.
    George was born in 1895 in Haverton Hill. His mother and father, John & Elizabeth Heatley, had come from the North West of England to work in the salt industry. In 1911 they were living at 19 Victoria Terrace, Haverton Hill. George was a office clerk at the salt works. He has no known grave and is commemorated on this memorial & the Pozieres Memorial.

    Like

  20. Private James Mellon served with the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (9th battalion). On 22 March 1918 he was with his regiment at Guyencourt, at the southern end of the area covered by Operation Michael. When the Germans attacked the order was given for a fighting retreat. When the assembly point was reached only 16 officers and 160 other ranks of the battalion were present. James Mellon was killed on this day. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial.
    James was born in Port Clarence in 1894. His parents Neal & Margaret Mellon had come from Tyrone, Ireland prior to 1878. At the time of James`s enlistment they were living at 14 (or 15) Marton Street, Port Clarence. Neal died at some time between 1901 & 1911 and Margaret died in 1921. James had siblings who probably put his name forward for inclusion on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence Memorial. Hugh Mellon, James`s older brother also served during the war, signing up in September 1914 with the Royal Field Artillery. he would survive the war.

    Like

  21. In March 1918, boosted by an influx of troops from the Eastern front, the German army launched its spring offensive. The aim was to win the war before American troops could reach the Western front in significant numbers. The offensive began on 21 March 1918 with an attack known as Operation Michael (21 March – 5 April 1918). The plan was to split the British and french armies on the Somme. The Germans hoped this would force the British to retreat to the Channel ports and the French to retreat to Paris.
    At 4.40 A.M. German artillery began the biggest barrage of the war. In five hours over 3,500,000 shells were fired against the British forward and reserve positions along a 40 mile front.Winston Churchill, the then Minister of Munitions, was at Nurlu and gave a first hand account. ” It swept round us in a wide curve of red leaping flame stretching to the North far along the front of the Third army, as well as of the Fifth army on the south, and quite unending in either direction…the enormous explosions of the shells on our trenches seemed almost to touch each other, with hardly a interval in space or time”. This was followed by a German infantry assault using shock troops armed with machine guns and flamethrowers. Aided by fog and the breakdown in communications between the British front line and their headquarters the Germans made rapid advances.The British were forced into a fighting retreat, with small groups of soldiers standing their ground to enable the majority to reach defensive positions. Two men from Haverton Hill were killed on this first day.
    Private Arthur Batey served with the Staffordshire Regiment (2nd/6th battalion). The battalion was at Bullecourt on the north of the offensive. The Germans outflanked the Staffordshires and captured their H.Q. When the remanants of the battalion managed to regroup 23 officers and 600 other ranks were missing. Arthur Batey would be among the dead. Unlike many others his body would receive a burial. He now lies in the Honourable artillery company Cemetery at Ecoust-St.Main.
    Arthur was born in Selby, Yorkshire. At some point between 1904 & 1911 his parents Walter & Annie Batey moved to Haverton Hill, where Walter worked at the salt works. In 1911 they were living at Manhood Place. By the time of Arthur`s death they were at 31 Oak Street. Arthur`s older, Wilfred Batey is also commemorated on this memorial. He had been killed in action on 7 June 1917.
    Rifleman Herbert Wood served with the Rifle Brigade (8th battalion) On 21 March 1918 they were in reserve trenches at Clastres, to the south of the offensive. The battalion was ordered to retreat to the canal bank at Jussy. `D` company fought a rearguard action to cover retirement of the battalion. Casualties of the battalion between 21 May and 31 May 1918 were 16 officers and 354 other ranks. Herbert Wood was among those killed. He is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial.
    Herbert was born in Ingelby Barwick. By 1901 his parents William & Lily wood were living at Belasis, Billingham. Lily died in 1901. William wood remarried and by 1911 the family were living at 12 Pearl Street, Haverton Hill. Herbert`s older brother George William Wood is also commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence Memorial. He was killed in action on 30 October 1918.

    Like

  22. Private Bertram Redhead is named on this memorial. He served with the 9th battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment. He died 5 December 1917, aged 25, and is buried in Saint Patricks Cemetery, Loos, France.
    He was the son of Edward & Martha Redhead who lived at 13 Windsor Street, Haverton Hill.

    Like

    • Bertram Redhead was one of 400 men who were absorbed into the 9th battalion of the West Yorkshire Regiment in November 1917, having formerly served with the Yorkshire Hussars.
      The Yorkshire hussars was a territorial cavalry regiment formed for home defence. It`s headquarters was in York and in 1914 it had a squadron at Middlesbrough. On the outbreak of war many of it`s members volunteered for foreign service. They were formed as the 1/1st Yorkshire Hussars and would be present at the battle of Arras in May 1916.
      During August 1917 the regiment was dismounted and retrained, at Etaples, as infantry. In November 1917 they reinforced the depleted 9th battalion, which was re-titled the 9th (Yorkshire Hussars Yeomanry) battalion.
      By December 1917 the battalion was occupying front line trenches in the Loos sector. No major battles took place during this period but patrols into no mans land were a regular feature. It is perhaps during one of these that, on the 5 December, Bertram Redhead received his fatal wound.

      Like

  23. The First Battle of Cambrai took place between 20 November – 7 December 1917. It marked the first large scale use of the tank. The British assembled 476 tanks for the battle. These combined with new artillery tactics finally broke the stalemate of trench warfare. At there furthest gain the allies had advanced 5 miles into German territory. Unfortunately they were unable to capitalise on their gains and on 30 November to the South of Cambrai the Germans mounted a counter offensive.
    At this time Private John Edward Gibbon, who is named on this memorial, was Serving with the Loyal North Lancashire regiment (1/5th battalion). The 1/5th Loyals were part of the British 55th Division, who were occupying the line to the South of Cambrai. On the morning of 30 November the 1/5th suffered heavy casualties in a stand against the Germans at Villers-Guislain. Eventually forced to withdraw the battalion roll call recorded 2 dead, 40 wounded and 402 missing (many of these would be dead). John Edward Gibbon would be among the dead. he has no known grave and is commemorated, with 7,064 British and South African soldiers who shared the same fate, on the Cambrai Memorial at Louverval. The memorial holds the names of seven recipients of the Victoria Cross.
    John was born in Haverton Hill. I`m not sure when he enlisted, but in 1915 he had married a Edith Eleanor knight. I believe there short marriage produced a daughter, Elsie, born in 1915. His widows address is given as Bridge Street, Haverton Hill.
    During it`s service on the Western Front with the 55th Division, the 1/5th Loyals suffered 30 officers and 408 other ranks killed, 28 officers and 1,333 other ranks wounded. In February 1918 the remains of the the 1/5th were disbanded and merged with the 2/5th Loyals to form the 5th battalion Loyal North Lancashires.

    Like

  24. Percy Archer lived at 4 Railway Terrace, Haverton Hill, with his mother Esther Hughf. He served with the Royal Field Artillery gaining the rank of Sergeant. He died during the Third Battle of Ypres on 9 November 1917 and is buried in Track X Cemetery, North East of Ypres.

    Like

    • Percy Archer was born in Stowe, Staffordshire circa 1893. His mother Esther was born in Haverton Hill. She was living here when she married Percy`s father, John Archer. John was a mineral boring foreman. There first child Edith was born circa 1888 in Haverton Hill. The family then moved out of the area, presumably due to John`s profession. In 1891 they were living in East Grinstead, East Sussex. By 1901 Esther was a widow and was living at 9 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill with her parents, George and Elizabeth Piercy.
      Around 1908 Esther married John Hughf, who was an engine diver at the nearby saltworks. In 1911 the family were living at 4 Railway Terrace. Percy was a labourer at the ironworks.

      Like

      • The In Memoriam section of the North Eastern Daily Gazette for 9 November 1918 had 5 notices for Sergeant Percy Archer, RFA, who fell in action at Passchendale, November 9th 1917.
        They were from his aunt Meggie, also Edie, Gertrude, Robert & Jack; Aunt Lizzie, Uncle Tom & the boys; Aunt Sarah. But perhaps the most poignant one read- Ever remembered by his sincere friend Helen. They miss him most, who loved him best.
        The Battles of Passchendaele were part of what became the Third Battle of Ypres.
        Percy Archer was serving with the Royal Field Artillery (84th brigade) his battery were firing howitzers (British heavy artillery). Part of their roll was to try and destroy German defensive pill boxes. The heavy guns were usually situated behind the front lines but German counter artillery attacks meant there position was equally dangerous.
        Track X Cemetery is situated in what was the “no mans land” between the British and German lines.

        Like

  25. Walter & Annie Batey, who lived at 31 Oak Street, Haverton Hill have two sons named on this memorial.
    Wilfred Batey served as a private in the Durham Light Infantry (12th battalion). He was killed, age 21, on the first day of the Battle of Messines, on 7 June 1917. On this day the 12th battalion were ordered to attack the German Lines at a place known as Hill 60. For two years prior to the battle British, Canadian & Australian tunneling Companies had been mining towards the German lines at Messines Ridge. A series of deep mines were to be filled with explosives, underneath the German trenches, and set off before the attack. The completed mines eventually contained 447 tons of ammonal and gun cotton.
    Prior to the attack there was a bombardment of the German positions by British artillery. Half an hour before dawn the artillery fire ceased. In the silence that followed troops said they heard a Nightingale sing. At 3.10 a.m., on 7 June 1917, the mines on the ridge were fired within the space of 20 seconds. The subsequent explosion is said to be the largest non-nuclear explosion of all time. The sound was heard in London and in Lille the university`s geology department mistook the shock wave for an earthquake. one of the mine blasts at Spanbroekmolen formed the “Lone Tree Crater” which was 250 feet wide and 40 ft deep. It is estimated 10,000 Germans died in the explosion.
    Because of the devastation among the German lines the 12th battalion suffered light casualties. unfortunately Wilfred Batey was among these. He has no known grave and is among the missing named on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.
    Walter & Annie would lose another son in 1918. Wilfrid`s younger brother, Arthur Batey.

    Like

  26. There is a M Kelly named among the fallen of the Great war on this memorial. I have been unable to find a definite person linked to the district. Many military records were destroyed during the Second World War.The website for the Yorkshire regiment “Green Howards” lists him as Private 241405 Michael Kelly.
    Michael Kelly served with the Yorkshire regiment (5th battalion). He enlisted in Middlesbrough and died 30 October 1917. He is buried in Mendinghem Military Cemetery in Belgium. Mendinghem is not an actual town or village in Belgium. It was a joke name, ( mending them), given to the nearby casualty clearing station. Michael must have been treat for wounds but did not survive. In the register of soldiers effects his next of kin is his mother Elizabeth.
    Hopefully there may be an ancestor out there who can provide more information.

    Like

    • Martin, just a word of congratulations on all of the research which you have undertaken into these fallen soldiers and their families. Your work transforms simple names and dates into real individuals who lived amongst our ancestors.
      I am sure that their relatives will be very grateful for the time and effort which you have put into your research…… I know that I am.

      Like

      • Thank you for your comment Cliff and may I return the compliment. As a regular reader of the Picture Stockton website I have viewed your numerous contributions and comments with great interest. My contributions are based on old records, but it`s the first hand histories of people like yourself and the regular contributors who have lived through the changes that Stockton has experienced that make the site so special. Thanks also to the staff at Stockton Library services for their dedication to the site.
        I have researched the majority of the names from the Great War and hope to add further details of these men, at dates close to the centenary of their deaths, right up to 2018.

        Like

      • May I very belatedly echo Cliff Thornton’s thanks, Martin? I’ve only just very recently discovered a whole swathe of (long-deceased) paternal-side relatives of whom I was completely unaware. And even more recently I’ve discovered this site, and your wonderful jewels of information. You manage, in very few words, to not only convey really important factual information but also paint lovely rich micro-portraits of the men and their families, very evocatively and very beautifully. Thankyou for honouring them all in this way.

        My forebears were brothers John and Patrick Hanna (detailed down-thread), of 25 New Cottages, Port Clarence. They were brothers to my paternal grandfather James.

        Power to your arm, Martin.

        Like

  27. Lance Corporal Peter Bennions is named on this memorial. He served in the Great War with the Durham Light Infantry (15th battalion). On 22 October 1917 the 15th battalion were fighting in the Third battle of Ypres at Zillebeke Bund. They were under heavy attack from German artillery fire, which included mustard gas..Peter Bennions would lose his life, aged 24, on 22nd October and has no known grave. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.
    Peter was born in Haverton Hill. Prior to the war he lived with his father William, his mother Mary Ann, brothers William & John & sister Francess at 31 Ash Street, Haverton Hill. Peter and his father worked at the nearby salt works. In common with a lot of the inhabitants of Haverton Hill at this time Peters parents had moved from the West side of the country to find work. William had been born in Liverpool & Mary Ann was born in Winsford, Cheshire.

    Like

  28. Ralph Tyerman Served as a Rifleman with the Rifle brigade (7th battalion) in the Great War. His name is on the monument but the surname is misspelled Tyreman. In 1916 he was awarded the Military Medal, but I don`t have any info why. Sadly he was killed in action, during the Third Battle of Ypres, on 17 October 1917 , aged 19. There were no major actions on this day so he was probably killed by artillery fire or sniper. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.
    Ralph was born in Stockton in 1898 to Joseph and Emily Tyerman. By 1901 he was living in Manchester, where his father ran a pub. In 1911 he had returned to Teesside and was living with his Grandparents Samuel & Ann Clough at 3 King Edward Street, Haverton Hill. Ann Clough was registered as his next of kin when the Army released his “effects” (personal possessions & pay that was owed) after his death.

    Like

  29. Corporal Olous Edward Daniel is named on the memorial. He was killed during the Third battle of Ypres, on 16 October 1917. His parents Oscar & Mary Daniel lived at 4 Victoria Street, Haverton Hill. He was serving with the Yorkshire regiment (9th battalion). There were no major actions on this day so he was probably the victim of artillery shells or sniper fire. Olous Daniel has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

    Like

  30. Albert Cattermole lived at 39 Elm Street Haverton Hill with his parents Geater J Cattermole & Elizabeth Cattermole. He enlisted early in the war, serving as a Bombardier with the Royal Field Artillery. He died 12 October 1917, age 23, whilst fighting on the Macedonian front. He is commemorated on this memorial and is buried in the Karasouli Military Cemetery, Greece.

    Like

    • James Albert Cattermole was born in Haverton Hill in 1894. He was one of the early volunteers during the war, disembarking with the Royal Field Artillery in France in May 1915. His brigade joined the 26th Division in July 1916 and was posted to Salonika. He died on 12 October 1917 at the 28th Casualty Clearing Station, Karasouli.
      He was serving with the 79th Small Arms Ammunition Column, attached to the 79th Infantry Brigade. The job of the Small Arms Ammunition Column was to supply the front line troops with ammunition. They also had to recover the unused ammunition from the battlefield. This could be a hazardous task, but the casualty rate from illness at Salonika was far higher than those caused in action. Mainly due to malaria. Albert Cattermole could possibly have died from illness.
      The British and French had established a garrison at Salonika in October 1915 to assist the Serbian army against the Bulgarians. There were few battles in the campaign and most soldiers here peacefully sat out the war. This led to soldiers on the Western front referring to the British soldiers at Salonika as ” Gardeners”.

      Like

  31. John & Hannah Keenan of 1 Queens terrace, Port Clarence lost two sons during the Great war. Both of whom are commemorated on this memorial. Richard Keenan was killed on 25 September 1915 whilst serving with the Durham Light infantry (15th battalion). His brother Francis Keenan died on 23 August 1917. Francis served with the Durham Light infantry (10th battalion).
    On 23 August 1917 the Tenth were participating in the Third Battle of Ypres, close to the village of Zillebeke, south East of the city of Ypres. During attacks on the Germans they came under intense artillery fire from both German and British artillery. One platoon of 30 men of the 10th battalion suffered 24 killed by their own artillery. The Germans subsequently counter attacked using flame throwers and light machine guns. Early on August 25 1917 the Tenth were relieved and moved back to Zillebeke. Their losses during the battle had amounted to 14 officers and 355 other ranks out of a battalion strength of 20 and 608 at the beginning of the battle.
    Francis Keenan has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial to the missing.The scale of devastation caused by artillery is shown by the graves contained in Tyne Cot Cemetery, which contains the memorial to the missing. Of the 11,965 burials in the cemetery 8,369 are unnamed. Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing contains the name of 33,787 men of the United kingdom and 1,176 New Zealanders. With no recognised grave war memorials in this country would have been the only place many relatives would have been able to visit and pay their respects.

    Like

  32. There was another memorial to the Great war dead of Haverton Hill & Port Clarence.
    In St John`s Church, Haverton Hill there was a lectern carved by a Mr W.G. Brown.The lectern was made of teak and was 7 feet 6 inches high with carved panels surmounted by an eagle. One of the panels contained the names of 82 men. Mr Brown was an employee of the North Eastern Railway Company working at Port Clarence. The lectern was the result of 470 hours of his work. A picture of Mr Brown and the lectern is featured on a fantastic website created by the North East War Memorials Project.
    St John`s church was subsequently demolished. Does anyone know if this lectern has survived? It would be a tragedy if all Mr Browns work was also destroyed.

    Like

    • W.G. Brown was William Gilleard Brown, who in 1911 was a traffic foreman for the North Eastern Railway Company, living at 7 Railway Cottages, Port Clarence. He also erected a plaque, in the form of a shield, in St John`s church, dedicated to his friend Arthur Waller.
      Arthur Appleton Waller served with the Durham light infantry and was killed in action on 3rd March 1917. His parents John & Sarah Waller lived at 23 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill.
      William Gilleard Brown was originally from Selby, where he worked for the railway company. He and his wife, Mary Elizabeth, had a number of children (Florence May, William John, James Ernest, Rhoda & Lawrence), most of whom were born in Selby.

      Like

  33. Rifleman Harold Fisher is commemorated on this memorial. He served with the Rifle Brigade and died 21 August 1917, aged just 19. His parents Frederick & Mary Jane Fisher lived at 17 Victoria Street, Haverton Hill. He is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension Nord. Bailleul is a town in northern France on the Belgium border.

    Like

    • Harold Fisher was born in West Bromwich. His father moved the family to Haverton Hill between 1907 & 1911. Frederick was an iron moulder, probably at Anderston`s Foundry at Port Clarence.
      Harold served with the Rifle Brigade (13th battalion). Between 8th to 25th August 1917 the 13th battalion was in barracks at Locre, now Loker, South West of Ypres, Belgium. During this period they provided working parties for the front line. Harold Fisher died of wounds, most likely the result of German artillery, on 21 August 1917,

      Like

  34. There are a number of men who died during the Great war, and are linked to Haverton Hill & Port Clarence, who do not appear on this memorial. I understand that when war memorials were being erected it was often the case that names were only included if they were put forward by relatives of the deceased. A number of years may have passed between an individuals death and the erection of this memorial in 1922. This could mean that perhaps there was no living relative in the area to put forward a name. One such individual who does not appear on the memorial is John Richard Whitley.
    Private John Richard Whitley served with the West Yorkshire Regiment (7th battalion). He died 17 November 1917 near to Ypres in Belgium. The Commonwealth war Graves Commission lists him as being the son of Emma Whitley of 71 Cowpen Road, Haverton Hill. He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military cemetery, Belgium. It is possible that his mother had passed away before 1922.

    Like

    • A Lance Corporal John Robinson was reported as having died, in the 22 August 1916 edition of The North Eastern Daily Gazette. This was as a result of wounds received in action on 3 March 1916. His parents were given as the late Henry Robinson & Elizabeth Robinson of Haverton Hill & Port Clarence. No regiment or service number was given. Which makes it problematic identifying this individual. There is no John Robinson commemorated on this memorial.
      No John Robinson is listed on the Commonwealth War Graves database as dying 3 March 1916. At present the closest candidate, who died between the period 3 March to 22 August 1916, is a Lance Corporal 16986 J. Robinson, who served with the East Yorkshire Regiment (8th battalion). He died 6 March 1916 and is buried in Etaples Military cemetery.
      The notice in the Gazette ends with remembered by his mother, sisters & brothers. I wonder why his name was not put forward for commemoration on the memorial. Perhaps all his family had moved. Or maybe their grief was too great. Some families declined to have their loved ones names on memorials because they were a constant reminder of the futility of the war.

      Like

      • After a bit more research I have discovered Lance Corporal 16986 J. Robinson does have links with Haverton Hill & Port Clarence.
        He was born John Robinson in 1880 at Marske, Yorkshire. By 1891 he and his parents, Henry & Elizabeth were living at 13 Ash Street, Haverton Hill. At the time of the 1901 census john was living with his widowed mother, brother David & sister Ella at 30 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill. In 1903 John married Lottie Raisbeck. By 1911 they had three daughters and were living with Lotties parents at West Lane, Middlesbrough. John worked in the nearby blast furnaces but on the outbreak of war he must have been one of the early volunteers.
        John`s mother and siblings also moved. By 1911 Elizabeth was living at 31 Victoria Terrace, Port Clarence along with her daughters, Eliza Baker, Ella Robinson & grandson Henry Robinson Baker. John`s brother David now lived with his wife & children at 41 New cottages, Port Clarence.
        Elizabeth died prior to John`s death in 1916. Judgement shouldn’t be made on the grieving relatives, they thought enough to place a notice in the Gazette. Sadly it appears that John Robinson isn`t commemorated on the Middlesbrough War Memorial either.
        In some parts of the country names of forgotten soldiers from the Great War are still being added to memorials. Fortunately Lance Corporal 16986 J. Robinson is not forgotten in the country where he died. The Commonwealth War Graves Commission tends all the graves of the fallen servicemen.

        Like

    • James Devlin was born near Cookstown ,Northern Ireland. At some point prior to the war he emigrated to England and settled in Port Clarence. when war broke out, despite being in his late 30`s, he volunteered to serve with the Royal Navy. He was posted to the armoured cruiser HMS Hampshire as a stoker.
      On 5 June 1916 the Hampshire was tasked with taking Lord Kitchener to Russia for negotiations. Beset by a fierce storm on leaving, the cruiser was alone passing the Orkney Isles when she struck a mine laid by a German submarine. The ship began to sink rapidly and as she launched her life rafts they were dashed against the ship by the heavy seas. Due to the weather most of the survivors who managed to get away in the life rafts died of exposure before they reached land. Only twelve crew out of over 650 men lived to see dry land. James Devlin was not among them. Neither was Lord Kitchener.
      James` parents, John & Hannah, would have received a letter at their home in Northern Ireland informing them of their sons death. If anyone in Port Clarence was told of his loss I don`t know. James was 40. His named is inscribed on the Naval memorial at Chatham. When the memorial in Haverton Hill was commissioned and names were put forward James Devlin may have been forgotten by most. His name would not feature on the memorial.
      Today thanks to research done in the town of his birth he is included on a website dedicated to the war dead of Cookstown and other towns in Northern Ireland.

      Like

      • In 1901 James Devlin was living as a boarder with James O`Brien & family at Lowthian Terrace, High Clarence, Haverton Hill. He was working as a coke filler at the local blast furnaces and gave his age as 22. It would be his brother Mike who lived in Kildress Parish, County Tyrone who would receive the notification of his death.
        Modern research puts the death toll of the “Hampshire” at 737 men. In the years that followed the sinking there were stories that rescuers had been prevented from assisting as part of a secret cover up. These have since been discounted.

        Like

    • Private Albert Bolland served with the Durham Light infantry (2nd battalion) he was killed 15 January 1915. he is recorded as being the son of a Mrs Whitley of 70 Cowpen Bewley Road, Haverton Hill. He also had a wife, Elizabeth Ann Reece (formerly Bolland). His name is on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.
      Could Albert Bolland & John Richard Whitley be the sons of the same Mrs Whitley? i imagine if she had been around at the time when the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence memorial was being proposed she would have wanted to have both sons named on it.
      There is an A. BOLLANDS commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence war memorial. There is also a G. WHITLOW on the memorial, who I have been unable to identify (there is no G. WHITLOW on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission database). Could these both be errors on the memorial? A. BOLLANDS (A. BOLLAND), G.WHITLOW (J.R. WHITLEY). There appear to be a Few other names with errors on the memorial.
      Is there anyone out there who is an ancestor of these two men and could shed some light on the mystery?

      Like

      • Hello , I have been looking at my grandparents history and my great grandparents Edward and Mary Bollands who lived at 12 Railway Terrace Haverton Hill and i have a memorial band with the details of : Pte. Robert William Bollands (200 DLI) dies 30/3/18 interred at Rueon cemetry. I cannot seem to find his name against any war grave . Could you help ?

        Like

        • Hello Pauline. Your ancestor Robert William Bollands lies in St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen, France. The reason you have found him difficult to locate is down to a different spelling of his surname on his gravestone. If you go on the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website he will be listed as R W Bolland. Private. 22/200. Durham Light Infantry. He is also recorded in “Soldiers Who Died In The Great War” as R W Bolland. This error may stem from his army service records.
          Robert William Bollands was born in Shildon, Durham. By 1911 he was living with his parents at 12 Railway Terrace, Haverton Hill. His father Edward was an engine driver for the North Eastern Railways. Robert enlisted at Darlington with the Durham light Infantry (22nd battalion). He is listed as having died of wounds on 31 March 1918. Age 28. He had married at some point and his widow remarried shortly after his death. Her address is given as Dora M Byrne (formerly Bolland) of 3 South Street, New Shildon.
          I do not know if his parents were still alive when the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War memorial was announced. His name does not appear on this memorial. I believe he may be named on the war memorial at Shildon.

          Like

        • Pauline,
          Try Bolland.This is from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission Website, he is also mentioned on the Middlesbrough War Memorial.

          BOLLAND
          Private
          22/200
          ROBERT WILLIAM
          Sunday, March 31, 1918
          Age 28
          ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN
          P. IX. G. 14A.
          VIEW RECORD
          Durham Light Infantry
          United Kingdom

          Like

          • Pauline,
            A bit more info for you.

            Robert William Bolland was born and lived in Shildon and enlisted in Darlington. With the 22nd battalion of the Durham Light Infantry, Private Bolland was wounded during the 1918 Somme battles and died of his injuries aged 28 on March 31st 1918. His grave today lies in St Sever Cemetery Extension at Rouen where many medical units were based. Robert Bolland was the son of Edward and Mary Bolland of Haverton Hill and the husband of Dora M Byrne, formerly Bolland of 3 South Street in Shildon.

            Like

    • Arthur Hetherington was the assistant master at Haverton Hill council school from 1913 onward. In December 1915 he enlisted as a private but probably because of his education was eventually sent to officer cadet school in Bristol. By September 1917 he was awarded a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (9th battalion). He was killed in action on 22 March 1918, on the Somme, aged 30. His body was never recovered and his name is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial.
      He does not feature on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial. Arthur was born in Brampton, Cumbria. His family remained in Cumbria. His parents Samuel & Annie Hetherington had passed away by 1922. I don`t know if the school erected a memorial as it was subsequently demolished. Arthur had a brother and sister living in Carlisle and his name is commemorated on a board in the Brampton War memorial hospital. Sadly Arthur also had a fiance who he met in Bristol.

      Like

    • Another ” Havertonian” not on the monument is Rifleman John James Ankers, who served in the Rifle brigade (10th battalion).
      John james was born in Haverton Hill and prior to the Great War lived with His parents, Moses and Martha Ankers and siblings at 18 Oak Street, Haverton Hill.By 1915 he was working in a steel works and living at 16 Oak Street. In June 1915 John James enlisted at Middlesbrough Town Hall. He gave his age as 19 years 56 days. But previous entries on the census put his age at closer to 16 years old, and as such under age. Despite him being only 5 feet 6 inches and 118 pounds he fooled the recruiting officers and was accepted. After training he was posted to the Rifle Brigade.
      On 14 August 1917 the Rifle Brigade (10th battalion) took part in an attack near the village of Pilckem, North of Ypres. The objective was to cross the Steenbeek river and occupy German territory. This was in preparation for the coming Battle Of Langemarck. The German defences included pillboxes. Heavy casualties were caused among the Rifle brigade by German machine guns and artillery. John James Ankers would be among the victims. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin gate) Memorial.
      By 1917 his mother, Martha, and his siblings had moved to Garbutt Street, Middlesbrough. This is probably the main reason he does not feature on this memorial. Understandably his name is included among the dead on the Middlesbrough War Memorial which would have been closer to his family.

      Like

    • Private 13652 John Stewart Gordon Highlanders (1st battalion) was born in Port Clarence. He died 14 June 1917, has no known grave, and is commemorated on the Arras memorial at Faubourg D`Amiens Cemetery, Arras. There is an F. Stewart listed on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial but I believe this may be an error.
      In 1911, age 13, he was living with his parents, Alexander & Catherine Stewart at 4 Church street, Port Clarence. I`m not absolutely certain of the location of Church Street, but going by the census it appears it was next to Bell Brothers Clarence Iron works. Alexander Stewart worked at the iron works. There house, like many others in the street, was comprised of only two rooms. Including John`s siblings there were actually six people living in these two rooms. Maps from 1897 show streets in the iron works, which were for the workers, known as Clarence Old Cottages. Streets around this time were often renamed. Some of the properties appear to be back to back houses.
      John had an older brother, Francis.Are there any ancestors who can clear up the mystery?

      Like

    • Private John Henry Barker was living at 20 Ash street, Haverton Hill at the time of his death on 8 June 1917. He had initially joined up with the 81st Training battalion but on his disembarkation in France, in May 1917, had been posted to the York & Lancaster Regiment (9th battalion). On 27 May 1917 the York & Lancasters were in front line trenches near Ypres. They were under repeated artillery attack and John Henry Barker was badly wounded. He was taken to No.2 Canadian casualty clearing station, near Lijssenthoek, Belgium. Unfortunately he succumbed to his wounds. He is buried in Lijssenthoek Millitary Cemetery.
      John Henry Barker was born in Billingham, to John & Annie Barker, around 1891. In 1914 he married Annie Maud Corner.In 1915 they had a daughter, Frances Hannah Barker. At this time they were living at 18 The Green, Billingham.
      His name is not commemorated on this memorial but a J Barker is commemorated on the memorials in Saint Cuthbert`s church, Billingham and the Billingham War memorial.

      Like

  35. One of a number of teenagers who are commemorated on this memorial is Robert Duncan. He served as a Private with the Welsh Regiment (15th battalion) and died near Ypres in Belgium on 28 July 1917, aged 18.
    He was the son of Stephen and Emma Duncan of 23 Elm Street, Haverton Hill. Robert was born in Haverton Hill, but his father , like many others in the locallity, had moved from Cheshire to work in the salt industry. Robert is buried in Dozinghem Military cemetery.
    Dozinghem is not actually a place in Belgium.The cemetery is near Poperinge, which was an assembly point for the allies prior to the battles around Ypres. In July 1917 a number of casualty clearing stations were set up in the area prior to an offensive which became known as the Third Battle Of Ypres. These were mobile hospitals which eventually, with the scale of casualties, became like small towns, The British troops gave them names which where puns on Belgium towns. The stations became known as Mendinghem, Dozinghem & Bandaghem. Dozinghem was home to the 4th, 47th & 61st casualty clearing stations.
    Robert died prior the Third Battle of Ypres, which commenced 31 July 1917. He may a been badly wounded during an artillery exchange or trench raid.

    Like

  36. On 28 June 1917 the 14th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment took part in an engagement to capture a fortified German position, named Oppy Wood, near Arras. Among the soldiers of this regiment was Private Robert Britton.
    Robert was from Port Clarence, the son of Thomas and Ellen Britton, who lived at 4 Lowthian Terrace. He was to become a casualty during the engagement, sadly dying on 2 July 1917. His body now rests in Duisans British Cemetery, near Arras. The cemetery was used by the 8th, 19th & 41st Casualty Clearing Stations.
    The York & Lancaster Regiment (14th Battalion) was also Known as the 2nd Barnsley Pals Battalion. The “pals” battalions were made up of recruits from the same districts and suffered high casualties during the Battle Of The Somme. To replenish the numbers recruits were drafted from elsewhere in Great Britain. This is probably why someone from Port Clarence served with the York & Lancasters.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. During the First World war there was a German prisoner of war camp at Port Clarence. I believe three prisoners died whilst in the camp and were buried in the church yard of Saint John the Evangelist, at Haverton Hill. Their bodies may have been repatriated after the war as there are no German war graves in the cemetery today.
    The prisoners were given work on road and land reclamation schemes in the area. It was reported on 15 June 1917 that groups of German prisoners were along the side of the River Tees when the boat carrying King George V and his queen past by on its route from Middlesbrough to Ropners shipyard in Stockton. Surprisingly they cheered the King as he went by.

    Like

    • In 1959 the governments of the United kingdom and the Federal republic of Germany made an agreement about the future care of the remains of German military personnel and German civilian internees of both World Wars who at the time were interred in various cemeteries not already maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. It was agreed that the remains would be transferred to a single central cemetery, established for the purpose, at Cannock Chase, Staffordshire.
      The inauguration of the cemetery took place in June 1967. It now contains nearly 5,000 German, Austrian & Ukranian graves. I haven`t yet been able to establish if the remains of the Port Clarence POW`s are lying here. The inhabitants of Haverton Hill and Port Clarence, of 1916, would have been witness to the deaths of two other Germans now buried at the Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery.
      On the night of 27 November 1916 the German Zeppelin L34 was on a raid to bomb targets in the North East of England. The airship had bombed Hartlepool and was heading East when it was intercepted by a BE2C aeroplane flown by 2nd Lt. Ian Vernon Pyott of 36 squadron, based at Seaton Carew. Pyott pursued and fired numerous rounds into L34 as it turned back out to sea off the mouth of the River Tees. At 11.40 P.M. the Zeppelin burst into flames, the descent took several minutes, with the fireball of the doomed Zeppelin visible for miles around. The wreckage fell into the Tees Bay off Hartlepool. All the crew of 20 died. The bodies of two crew members, Julius Wilhelm Petitjean & Alfred Ruger, were washed ashore at a later date. They were initially buried, on 11 January 1917, at Seaton Carew. They now lie in the German Military Cemetery.
      The remains of another three crew members were also recovered from the sea but there is no further information on where they were buried.

      Like

  38. The Battle of Arras took place between 9 April and 16 May 1917 around the French city of Arras. During the battle the British First & Third armies suffered about 160,000 casualties and the German 6th Army 125,000 casualties. Lance Corporal P Barker of the Durham Light infantry (10th Battalion), who is commemorated on this memorial, was killed here on 14 May 1917.
    He was was the son of Barbara Barker who lived at 7 Victoria street, Haverton Hill.His body is in Wancourt British cemetery, which is 8 Kilometres South east of Arras.
    Among the many acts of heroism which took place during the battle was that of Private Michael Heaviside of the Durham light infantry (15th battalion). He was a stretcher bearer and former miner from Craghead. On the morning of 6 May, despite machine gun and sniper fire, he crawled across no mans land to a shell hole only 40 yards from the German lines to the aid of a badly wounded soldier who had laid out on the battlefield for several days. After treating the soldier Private Heaviside crawled back to the British lines and returned later under the cover of darkness with other stretcher bearers to rescue the wounded man. For his act of bravery he was awarded the Victoria Cross.
    The severity of the battle is demonstrated by the fact that, of the 1,936 burials Wancourt British cemetery contains, 829 are unidentified.

    Like

  39. Two of the men named on the memorial died 100 years ago this April.
    The Reverend Matthew Forster Burdess was an army chaplain attached to the 1/6th Gloucestershire Regiment.In April 1917 the Gloucestershire regiment were part of the 144th Brigade who were occupying Peronne in the Somme area of France. The Reverend Burdess and a number of other officers were killed on 18 April 1917 when a mine was exploded near to their dugout.
    Reverend Burdess had been the rector of St. Thomas` at Port Clarence prior to signing up. He was born in Sunderland and was the son of George & Rachel Ann Burdess. He was aged 39. He is buried in Villers-Faucon Communal Cemetery, near Peronne. Also buried on the same date in this cemetery are five other officers (3 Gloucestershire, 1 Royal Scots & 1 Royal Army Medical Corp ), who I assume must have been the in the dugout.
    Private Joseph William Forster served with the Royal Marine light Infantry. He died 22 April 1917 near to Arras. His father was George Henry Forster who lived at 1 Lowthian Terrace, Port Clarence. He is buried in Maroeuill British Cemetery, which is 6 kilometers North west of Arras.

    Like

    • Reverend Burdess was a priest at Saint Mary`s catholic church, Stockton-On-Tees, prior to becoming rector at Port Clarence. He is also commemorated on the Pieta which stands outside Saint Mary`s in Stockton.
      Tragically he had only been in France for five weeks when he died.

      Like

      • On 18 April 1918 the 1/6th Gloucestershire Regiment’s battalion H.Q. was situated in a cellar at Villers Faucon. It was destroyed by a German mine with a delayed fuse. Six British officers were killed in the explosion.
        Captain Matthew Forster Burdess. Army Chaplains Department.
        Major Robert Finlay Gerard. Royal Scots.
        Captain Everard Harrison. Royal Army Medical Corps.
        Lieutenant Leonard King. Gloucestershire Regiment.
        Captain Louis Cameron Nott. Gloucestershire regiment.
        Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Walker Nott. Gloucestershire Regiment.
        The last two officers were brothers.

        Like

    • Joseph William Forster is recorded as having died from disease. Approximately 662,000 soldiers died during the Great War. Of these 86,000 died from non military causes such as disease or accident. I do not have a definitive cause of death. He served with the 1st Royal Marine battalion, who were part of the 63rd Naval Division.
      Joseph William Forster was born in Port Clarence in 1889 to George Henry Forster & Elizabeth Annie Forster. Prior to the war he had worked as a cast iron moulder. Probably at the Anderston Foundry, Port Clarence.
      He is the only member of the Royal Marine Light Infantry buried in Maroueill British Cemetery.

      Like

  40. Lance Corporal Arthur Appleton Waller served with the Durham light Infantry (18th battalion). He died 3 March 1917. His name is on this memorial and he is buried in Varennes Military Cemetery, France.
    The cemetery lies between Albert & Amiens. It was used by the 4th, 11th & 47th Casualty Clearing Stations between October 1916 and May 1917. This would imply that he either died of wounds or disease.
    Arthur was 28 and was born in Haverton Hill, Prior to the war he had worked at the salt works in Haverton Hill. He was one of ten children born to John & Sarah Waller who lived at 23 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill.

    Like

  41. The men named on this memorial served in a wide range of the Great War campaigns. Braithwaite Reginald Swinburne died during the campaign in Mesopotamia. He was killed in an accidental explosion whilst serving as an acting sergeant with the Royal Engineers (Inland Water Transport) on 2 March 1917. He is also commemorated on the Basra Memorial.

    Like

    • Prior to enlisting Braithwaite Swinburne lived at 59 New cottages, Port Clarence, with his wife, Catherine Ann and their children. On the 1911 census his profession was given as master of motor launch at a iron works. Probably Bell Brothers Clarence Iron Works.
      By March 1917 he was part of the British 3rd Corps who were advancing on Baghdad. On the evening of March 2nd 1917 Sergeant Swinburne, aboard a motor lighter, was at the 13th Divisions dump at Bagailah. Inexplicably he removed a detonator from a Turkish aeroplane bomb, which had been deposited at the dump, and attempted to dismantle it, The detonator exploded and Sergeant Swinburne was killed instantly. He was buried at Bagailah.
      The tragedy left Catherine Ann a widow and their five children without a father. His grave must have been lost subsequently as the Basra Memorial is for the missing of the campaign.

      Like

  42. There was a lull in the fighting on the Somme as winter set in, but men would continue to die. Lance Corporal Richard Dudley served with the Royal Engineers (95th Field company). He was killed 22nd December 1916 on the Somme. He is buried in Mailly Wood Cemetery, Mailly-Maillet, which is 9 Kilometers north of Albert.
    He was a native of Port Clarence and his parents lived at 6 Victoria Avenue, Stockton-On-Tees.

    Like

    • Richard Dudley was born in Port Clarence in 1887. He was one of eight children born to George & Annie J Dudley. His parents were originally from Cheshire and had moved to Port Clarence prior to 1883. Between 1901 & 1911 they lived at Clarence House, Port Clarence. Richard and his father both worked at the local salt works.
      On 22nd December 1916 the Royal Engineers (95th Field Company) were employed clearing British trenches near the village of Mailly Maillet in Northern France. They were part of the British 7th Division. Two men of the 95th field company were killed by shellfire on this day. One was Richard Dudley and the other was Sergeant. 58655. Tom William Hammond of Driffield, Yorkshire.They are buried along side each other in Mailly Wood Cemetery.

      Like

  43. 18 November 2016 marks the centenary of the end of the Battle Of The Somme. The British and French had advanced about 6 miles at a cost of 420,000 British & 200,000 French casualties. The Germans had suffered possibly 500,000 casualties. The battle had been one of attrition and came to a halt mainly because of the deteriorating weather conditions.
    Because of the huge losses of men and and horrendous battlefield conditions many of the fallen could not be recovered. In 1932 a memorial to these men was erected next to the village of Thiepval, off the Bapaume to Albert road in northern France. The memorial contains the names of 72,246 men of the United Kingdom and South Africa who died, and have no known grave, on the Somme before March 1918.Over 90% of these died between July and November 1916.
    14 men from Haverton Hill or Port Clarence are named on the Thiepval Memorial.

    Like

    • Two of the men named on this monument, who died during the Great war, that I have been unable to identify, are E. Andrews & H. Brown. There are two possible candidates, whose names are also commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.
      Private 34551 Ernest Arthur Andrews served with the York & Lancaster Regiment (9th Battalion).He was killed in action on 20th October 1916. He left a widow, Maria Andrews who lived at 20 Stanley Street, Middlesbrough.
      Private 2393 Herbert Brown served with the Yorkshire Regiment (9th Battalion). He was killed in action on 16th November 1916. His father, William Brown, lived at 156 Victoria Road, Middlesbrough.
      Most war memorials were built after the First World War. The names that were added to them were put forward by relatives of the deceased. Due to many military service records being destroyed during the Second World war it is particularly difficult to identify some of those named on memorials. Especially if they have a common surname. Over time the men and their families may have moved away from their birthplaces, giving no obvious link. Both men are named on the Middlesbrough war memorial, as are some of the men who I have already identified on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence war memorial.
      If any one has further information on these two it may provide the link.

      Like

      • I have recently found a stronger candidate for the H. Brown commemorated on this memorial.
        Private. 20541. Harry Brown served with the Durham light infantry (13th & 12th battalions). Whilst with the 12th he was attached to the 12th field company Royal Engineers. On 25 June 1917 the 12th field company were maintaining communication trenches at Loos, under enemy artillery fire. Harry was killed on this day, age 31. His “effects” were divided among his half brothers, William & Robert and his sister Mary E. Brown. Other records give his details as born in Willington, Co. Durham, the son of James and Mary Ann brown.
        The 1911 census has a Henry Brown and his sister, Mary Elizabeth Brown, living with their brother Robert Brown, and his family, at 4 Samphire Street, Port Clarence. Robert, Mary & Henry are all born in Willington, Durham. Henry`s age is given as 24, which ties it closely to Harry Brown, age 31 in 1917. Harry is often used as an alternative to Henry.
        Censuses from 1881 & 1891 for Willington record the family and further reinforce the connection. With such a common name I can`t be 100% certain. Hopefully there may be an ancestor who can confirm this.
        Harry Brown is buried in Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, France. The cemetery was used to bring together isolated burials from the Loos sector.

        Like

    • Another soldier from Haverton Hill who is commemorated on this memorial and the Thiepval Memorial is Rifleman William Rowe. His family lived at 47 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill. He served with the Rifle Brigade (10th Battalion) and was killed on the Somme on 19 February 1917, aged 21.

      Like

      • William Rowe was my uncle (adoptive). My mother’s birth name was Hulse. She was born on 4th August 1914. Her parents were Thomas and Alice Hulse. Thomas was born in Cheshire but moved to Durham and worked as a salt boiler. Alice died when my mother was about 6 months old. She was given to Ralph & Anne Rowe of 47 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill, and was allowed no further contact with her birth family. Do you know anything about the Hulse family and if there are any relatives still living there?

        Like

        • You are my Nanas sister. My nana was Jane Hulse. She had an older sister that died around the same time as her mother. She also had sisters Francis, Ethel and a brother Len. My Nana was 5 years old Len was 3 and the baby.

          Like

        • Can Joan Stratton contact me please. I am the great granddaughter of Thomas and Alice Hulse. I have information and photographs of her lost family. Thank you.

          Like

      • In June 1915 three young men from Haverton Hill enlisted for war service at Middlesbrough town hall. I don`t know if they were friends but they may have been workmates as they all listed their trade as Steel workers. They were William Rowe (age 19), John James Ankers (age 19) and George William Bolton (age 18). All three would serve together with the Rifle Brigade (10th battalion). After basic training they were shipped to France disembarking on 1 October 1915. Sadly by 1917 all three had become victims of the war..
        George William Bolton died on 3 September 1916, during the Battle of Guillemont. William Rowe was wounded in the head during the battle and was later sent home to England to recover, but would return to the regiment in France in December 1916. The 10th battalion were still at Guillemont on 19 February 1917 when they came under fire from German trench mortars. This was followed by an attack which included enemy flame throwers. William Rowe would be killed during this attack. John James Ankers was the last to die. On 14 August 1917 he was killed near Pilckem.
        Two of them, George William Bolton & William Rowe are commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial, but for some reason John James Ankers isn`t.
        It is surprising to know that by modern standards a lot of these men were very small. William Rowe was 5 foot 3 inches and weighed only 104 pounds when he enlisted. To many of this generation, even those in work, their diet consisted mainly of bread, tea and fatty bacon. In fact such was the numbers of men under regulation height trying to enlist during the war that the height limit was reduced to 5 foot and special battalions, known as bantams, were formed.

        Like

  44. Rifleman Clifford French served with the Rifle Brigade. He was killed in action, on the Somme, 14 November 1916, age 20. He was the son of Thomas & Alice French, who lived at 12 Saltholme Terrace Port Clarence.
    He is listed among the Missing on the Thiepval Memorial.

    Like

    • Clifford French was one of the early volunteers for war service. He enlisted at West Hartlepool in September 1914. He was age 19 years, 60 days, born Cowpen Bewley on his attestation papers. Initially he served with the Rifle Brigade (12th battalion). Embarking in France in July 1915. He must have suffered badly from psoriasis as he was hospitalised with the condition in August 1915. Eventually he was sent back to England where he would spend 98 days in hospital. After release he was posted to the Rifle Brigade (13th battalion). It was whilst serving with the 13th battalion that, on 14 November 1916, he was killed during an attack on German trenches near Hedauville.
      Prior to enlisting Clifford had been a blacksmiths labourer. His father, Thomas, like many others in this district at the time, had moved to Port Clarence from the West side of England to work in the salt industry. Clifford had a number of brothers. One of whom, Stanley French, served with the Durham light infantry during the war.

      Like

  45. Private John Robert Christopher served with the Durham Light infantry (18th battalion). He died in France/Flanders on 12th November 1916. On the 1911 census he was living at 27 Wynyard Terrace, Billingham, with his wife Mary Hannah Christopher.

    Like

    • During October & November 1916 the Durham Light infantry (18th battalion) occupied the line near Hebuterne, on the Somme. At this time it was the worst sector on the front. Heavy rain and constant artillery fire had turned the front into an expanse of water-logged shell-holes.No major attacks took place here in this period, due to the conditions. The trenches the soldiers had to inhabit were thick with slime. Many soldiers were evacuated due to sickness.
      As with soldiers in previous wars, John Robert Christopher may have been a victim of disease rather than the enemy. He is buried in Hebuterne Military Cemetery. Hebuterne is a village 15 kilometres north of Albert, in northern France. It was used by fighting units and the field ambulances.

      Like

      • His military records state that John Robert Christopher was killed in action. The 18th battalion were part of the British 93rd Infantry Brigade holding the front line in the Hebuterne sector. Although conditions prevented either side from direct engagements there was a constant exchange of heavy artillery shelling. Like the majority of those killed during the war John Robert Christopher would be killed outside of a major battle.
        John Robert Christopher was born at Hutton Henry, Durham in 1887. In 1909 he married Mary (May) Hannah Frank at Hartlepool. By 1911 they were living in Billingham and John Robert was working at the nearby Casebourne`s cement works. In December 1914 he enlisted in the army. His address at this time was Osborne Street, Haverton Hill. In December 1915 the Durham Light infantry (18th battalion) were sent to Egypt as part of a force protecting the Suez Canal. There time there was short and by March 1916 they had landed in France. In July 1916 the battalion took part in the Battle Of the Somme, suffering 58 % killed or wounded. John Robert would be one of the survivors, only to be killed four months later.
        John Robert & Mary Hannah had three daughters, Dorothy May, Margaret & May. The last of these, May, he may probably have never seen, as she was born in May 1916. Mary Hannah Christopher would be awarded a Widows pension of 26 Shillings and 3 pence a week, for herself and three children, as compensation for her loss.
        I do not know if she nominated John Christopher for the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial. In late 1919 she remarried to a James Lee in Hartlepool. In 1921 they were living at Cornwall Street, Hartlepool. John Robert did have a brother, Richard Christopher, who was living at Cowpen Bewley Road, Haverton Hill. He may have been the nominee.

        Like

  46. Private Joseph Largan served with the Durham Light infantry (22nd battalion). He was killed in France/Flanders on 11 November 1916. He was the son of William & Margaret Largan of 60 New cottages, Port Clarence. He is buried in Grove Town cemetery, Meaulte.

    Like

    • The 22nd battalion Durham Light Infantry were a pioneer battalion.The pioneers were work battalions.There job, equally as dangerous as the infantry battalions, was to construct the trenches and dig tunnels under enemy lines, which would later be filled with tons of explosives and detonated to destroy the enemy positions.
      In November 1916 the 22nd battalion were close to Montauban, on the Somme, constructing a new communication Trench.The work was carried out under frequent enemy artillery fire. On 10 November 1916 the battalion lost six killed and nineteen wounded by shellfire. Joseph Largan was probably among these. He died of his Wounds the following day.
      Grove Town cemetery is near the village of Meaulte, just south of Albert, in northern France. In September 1916 the 34th & 2/2nd London casualty clearing stations were set up here. They dealt with casualties from the Somme battlefield. Although only temporary hospitals the casualty clearing stations were often formed into groups and could cover a substantial area. Soldiers gave them made up town names and erected street signs. The stations at Meaulte became known as Grove Town.

      Like

  47. There is a W Fenny commemorated on this memorial. The only W Fenny listed, among the dead of the First World war, by the commonwealth War Graves Commission, is Private 7099 William Fenny, who served with the Durham Light Infantry.
    I am still trying to establish a link to Haverton Hill or Port Clarence. William Fenny’s enlistment details give his place of residence as Stockton.He enlisted at Stillington. He was listed as missing on the Somme on 5 November 1916, age 20. His effects were given to his father, James Fenny, who lived at 9 Emily Street, Stockton-on-Tees.
    William Fenny has no known grave and is listed among the missing on the Thiepval Memorial.

    Like

    • William Fenny enlisted with the 5th battalion Durham Light Infantry (DLI), but on reaching France was posted to the 9th battalion DLI.
      On 5th November 1916 the 6th, 8th & 9th battalions DLI were tasked with taking the Butte De Warlencourt, an ancient burial mound, which dominated the ground on the road between Albert & Bapaume. The Germans had fortified the mound with barbed wire, machine guns & mortars. It was used for artillery observation and had been attacked unsuccessfully on a number of previous occasions during the Battle of the Somme.
      On the night of 4th November there had been heavy rain and the battlefield was a sea of mud, waist deep in some areas. Despite these terrible conditions the 9th battalion succeeded in capturing the Butte De Warlencourt for a short period before a heavy barrage and counter attack by the Germans forced them to retreat.
      Losses among the 9th battalion DLI were high. 130 men dead, 400 wounded & 300 missing.
      The mound would not be captured during the Battle of the Somme and would mark the furthest advance of the allies during the battle.

      Like

  48. Thomas & Ann Loughran, who lived at 37 New cottages, Port Clarence, lost two sons on the Somme. Private John Patrick Loughran served with the Machine Gun Corps. He was killed 3 September 1916, age 20.His older brother Thomas had been killed on the first day of the Battle of The Somme, back on 1 July 1916, whilst serving with the Durham Light Infantry.
    Both men were born in Port Clarence. They were two of eight children that Thomas & Ann raised. But that wouldn’t have lessened the loss.
    Neither men’s bodies were recovered from the battlefield.Their names are commemorated among the missing on the Thiepval Memorial.

    Like

      • On the 1911 census Thomas & Ann Loughran had two daughters living with them. Margaret, aged 18 & Catherine, aged 12. I don`t know if Kitty is an abbreviation of Catherine or whether the age of the kitty you knew matches.

        Like

  49. Private George Perks served with the Yorkshire regiment (5th battalion). He died on the Somme on 27th October 1916. He is also commemorated among the missing on the Thiepval Memorial.
    He was the son of George and Jane perks, who were living at 6 Manhood Place, Haverton Hill, on the 1911 census.

    Like

    • Mr & Mrs perks were notified of their sons death by post in December 1916. They would have received an envelope containing a printed standard army form (army form B.104-82), which had blank spaces for the records officer to fill in personal details of the deceased. Relatives of officers were informed by telegram or personal letter. Mr & Mrs Perks placed a notice in the Evening gazette accompanied by this poem.

      Only a private soldier
      Only a mothers son
      He left his home in the flower of youth
      He looked so young and brave
      We little thought how soon he’d be
      Laid in a heroes grave
      some day, we know not when
      We’ll clasp his hand in the better land
      And never part again

      Friends were invited to a service at St John’s church, Haverton Hill on Sunday 10 December 1916.
      George Perks was only 19 years old.

      Like

      • Hi Martin, do you know anything more about George Perks? Can you tell me the date of the Evening Gazette edition that carried the poem and notice? Thanks.

        Like

        • Sorry Steve I don’t have any more info on George. The notice was in the 8 December 1916 edition of the Evening Gazette.

          Like

          • George was born at Haverton Hill. He was one of nine children born to George & Jane Perks. At the time of his death the 1/5th battalion Yorkshire Regiment weren`t involved in any major battle. On 26-27 October 1916 they were employed in trench improvements near the village of Hannescamps, 20 KM South West of Arras, northern France. George was most likely a victim of shellfire.
            I believe Jane Perks died in 1920 and as such never lived to see the unveiling of this memorial.

            Like

        • I’m not sure if you have heard of the shrouds of the Somme a wonderful tribute to the 72 thousand fallen into unmarked graves. At the end of this great exhibition I was lucky enough to buy a shroud that represented one lost man and his name is George Perks the very same so today I brought out his shroud and honoured him then my husband found this site. I wish I could send you a photo of the shroud and the plaque to George I would like his family to know that a stranger in a far off land sends blessings to their relative

          Like

  50. There is a B Cotterill named on this memorial among the Great war dead. I have been unable to match a B Cotterill to this district but there is a J Cotterill, a resident of Port Clarence, listed in “soldiers who died in the Great War”.
    Private 15704 John Cotterill served with the East Yorkshire Regiment (1st battalion). He died on the Somme on 25 September 1916. He is among the missing named on the Thiepval Memorial.
    The initial on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence memorial could possibly be an error.

    Like

    • Private 15704 John Cotterill was born in Winsford, Cheshire. On the list of soldiers effects his next of kin is given as his sister, Frances E Chapman. On the 1911 census there is a Frances Ellen Chapman, who is living with her husband, Henry, at 33 Ash street, Haverton Hill. She was also born Winsford, Cheshire.
      The term soldiers effects, in the case of soldiers who were killed, meant any personal possessions and pay owed to them. These would be given to the next of kin, who had to apply for them.
      At this time, in Haverton Hill, Cheshire was a common birthplace for many. Cheshire was an area where salt was mined but during the late 19th century it had experienced a depression. Around the same period deposits of salt were discovered deep under ground at Port Clarence. These were pumped from underground in the form of brine. Large salt works were established at Haverton Hill. Workers flocked from Cheshire to work again in the salt industry. New houses were built to accommodate them. Ash, Oak & Elm were three of these new streets.

      Like

  51. Rifleman James Bateman served with the Rifle Brigade (8th battalion). The 8th battalion were part of the 14th Light Division which fought at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, on the Somme, on 15 September 1916. Rifleman Bateman was killed on this day. He was the son of James & Annie Bateman who lived at 33 Pearl Street, Haverton Hill. His body was never recovered and he is listed among the missing on the Thiepval Memorial.
    During this battle the British used the tank for the first time. Also the Canadian Corps & the New Zealand Division fought for the first time on the Somme.

    Like

    • The North Eastern Daily Gazette of 18 September 1916 contained a report from a Press Association correspondent writing from France.
      “To the right our troops were sweeping up to Flers, following in the wake of a new and wonderful type of armoured motor, which I had mysteriously heard referred to as “Land Dreadnoughts” for some time previously”.
      “For on this day we were fighting the Germans with a device such as their science and ingenuity have thus far not combined to produce. They began the competition when they let loose asphyxiating gas at Ypres in April 1915. Now we stalk them with great, weird looking, monster shapes of steel, which paralysed their defence.”
      Despite the correspondents obvious enthusiasm at the appearance of this new weapon the majority of the 49 tanks assembled for the attack were either to break down or fall victim to the terrain on the Somme, only six would reach the third objective of the battle.
      The weapon that it had been hoped would break the stalemate of trench warfare would prove more effective in later battles but war was to become one of attrition and millions more would die before its end.

      Like

  52. Rifleman George William Bolton served with the Rifle Brigade (10th battalion). He died on the Somme, on 3 September 1916, aged 20. His parents James & Jane Bolton lived at 65 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill.
    He is commemorated among the missing on the Thiepval Memorial.

    Like

    • George William Bolton was born in Haverton Hill in 1897. He was one of nine children born to James & Jane Bolton. He enlisted at Middlesbrough Town hall in June 1915 around the same time as two other young men from Haverton Hill, William Rowe & John James Ankers, both aged 19. They were probably friends or work mates, as they all listed their trade as steel works labourer. They would all be posted to the Rifle Brigade (10th battalion). All were allocated service numbers. S/13077 John James Ankers, S/13080 George William Bolton & S/13081 William Rowe. In October 1915 they embarked together in France. Sadly before the end of 1917 all would be dead.
      On 3 September 1916 the 10th battalion took part in the Battle of Guillemont. This was an attack on German positions near the village of the same name. Between 3rd & 4th September 1916 the 10th battalion would suffer 290 casualties. 41 other ranks were killed, 195 wounded & 54 missing. George William Bolton was among the missing. He was never seen again. William Rowe was wounded and would be later killed near Guillemont on 19 February 1917. John James Ankers would be the last to die on 14 August 1917, near Pilckem, North of Ypres. Sadly none of them have any known grave.
      George William Bolton & William Rowe are commemorated on this memorial. John James Ankers is commemorated on the Middlesbrough war memorial.

      Like

  53. Private John Hanna served with the Yorkshire Regiment (9th battalion). He lost his life on 8 August 1916 on the Somme. His body was never recovered and he is commemorated on this memorial and the Thiepval Memorial. He was the son of James and Alice Hanna of 25 New Cottages, Port Clarence.
    His brother Patrick Hanna is buried, with a military headstone, in St John’s churchyard, Haverton Hill.

    Like

    • John Hanna was born in Port Clarence in 1887. He was the eldest of nine children. His parents were originally from Ireland. By 1911 John was working as a labourer at the blast furnaces in Port Clarence.
      He was one of the early volunteers for war service, originally serving with the 6th battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment. The 6th battalion were sent to Gallipoli in July 1915. They saw action at Suvla Bay on 6 & 7 August 1915. In December 1915 they were evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt, where they took over the defence of the Suez Canal. In June 1916 the battalion was shipped to France to reinforce the Divisions on the Somme.
      By August 1916 John Hanna was serving with the 9th battalion Yorkshire Regiment near Albert. On 7 August 1916 three companies of the battalion relieved the 8th Yorkshire Regiment in the front line trenches. John Hanna would be among the casualties sustained by the 9th battalion (4 killed & 4 wounded) on this day. He would die the following day.

      Like

  54. Private John Carr served with the Yorkshire Regiment (9th battalion). He lost his life on the Somme on 10 July 1916. He was born in Port Clarence and was the son of Owen & Bridget Carr.
    He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

    Like

    • John Carr was born in Port Clarence in 1881. His parents Owen & Bridget Carr were originally from Ireland. In 1891 there address was no. 80 Cottage, Port Clarence. This was probably one of the properties in Bell`s iron works, where Owen was a labourer. By 1911 John was no longer living with the family and was an engine driver at the iron works, boarding at 15 Queens Terrace, Port Clarence.
      On 10 July 1916 his regiment, 9th battalion Yorkshire Regiment, were fighting in the Battle of Albert. The 9th attacked Contalmaison, 4 miles north of Albert. They were met by artillery, machine gun & rifle fire, suffering 16 killed, 203 wounded and 24 missing. Among these was John Carr.
      His wages and belongings were shared between his sisters Annie, Catherine & Maggie and his brothers Bernard & Michael. Owen & Bridget had died prior to 1917. At some point members of the family seem to have emigrated. In 1920 Annie & Catherine were living in Philadelphia, USA.

      Like

  55. The 2nd battalion Seaforth Highlanders took part in the first day of the Battle Of the Somme.Their wounded were taken to the casualty clearing station at Doullens. Private William Henry Turner was one of them. He died of his wounds on the 2nd of July 1916 and was buried in Doullens communal cemetery extension No.1.
    He was born in Haverton Hill and was the son of William Henry & Alice Turner. He was only 18 years old.

    Like

    • When war broke out in 1914 base hospitals were set up far from the fighting front.By 1915 it was realised that the wounds caused by the modern bullets and artillery were so severe that many men did not survive long enough to reach a hospital.A new military medical system needed to be set up.
      Wounded men would be taken from the battlefield to an aid post (sometimes a dug out on the battlefield) where they would be assessed and given treatment by a RMO (regimental medical officer).Those in need of further treatment would be moved to a casualty clearing station.
      Casualty clearing stations were mobile hospitals (often in tents) where severely wounded soldiers could receive life saving surgery.Many clearing stations were that close to the front that they received attacks from German artillery and aircraft.Once stabilised soldiers could be moved by ambulance trains to the base hospitals.Even with these improvements the horrific wounds and the duration of battles meant only immediate medical attention would save lives.
      This became the role of some of the bravest men of the war.The stretcher bearers.Initially the job had been undertaken by the drummers and signallers of a regiment but the need for rapid intervention led to the forming of a corps of men who were trained in battlefield first aid.When the soldiers went over the top during a battle they would be followed by the stretcher bearers,who were unarmed.Throughout the battle,and afterwards,these men would seek out the wounded,treat them and carry them to an aid post.This would all take place under constant artillery,machine gun and sniper fire.Battlefields like the Somme became a sea of mud which added to the task requiring astonishing feats of strength.The trauma these soldiers experienced is unimaginable.
      After the war many regimental history books would be written but the role of such soldiers as the stretcher bearers would go largely unrecorded.Anyone interested in the treatment of the wounded and dying soldiers during the first world war should read Emily Mayhew’s deeply moving book “Wounded”.This attempts to redress the balance.There is a copy in Stockton libraries collection.

      Like

    • There are conflicting names for William Henry Turner`s mother. On the 1901 & 1911 censuses she is named as Rosa Louisa Turner. She died in 1909. William Henry Turner Snr. may have remarried. The family had originally moved to Haverton Hill from Cheshire around 1895 to work in the salt industry. William Henry was one of 9 children (3 died prior to 1911). They lived at Oak Street, Haverton Hill.
      The 2nd Seaforth Highlanders were part of the 10th Infantry Brigade, 4th Army division. On 1 July 1916 they attacked the German front line north of Beaumont Hamel. There casualties on that day were 72 killed, 262 wounded & 54 missing. Most of the wounded would be from machine gun fire.

      Like

  56. 1 July 2016 is the centenary of the beginning of the Battle Of The Somme.On the first day the British Army suffered its worst number of casualties ever in a single day.57,470 men would become casualties,of which 19,240 were killed.At least five of the men named on the memorial were killed on this day.
    Private John Ashley served with the West Yorkshire Regiment.He left a widow,Emily,and was the son of James & Ann Ashley who lived at 19 Elm street, Haverton Hill.He is buried in Fricourt Military Cemetery.
    Rifleman Albert Buckley served with the Rifle Brigade.He was the son of Frederick & Elizabeth Buckley who lived at 16 Elm street, Haverton Hill.
    Private Thomas Craby served with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers.His father Thomas was originally from Ireland and lived at 62 New cottages,Port Clarence.
    Private Thomas Loughran served with the Durham light Infantry.He was the son of Thomas and Ann Loughran who lived at 37 New cottages,Port Clarence.His brother John Patrick Loughran would also be killed on the Somme,in November 1916.
    Private Thomas Williamson served with the West Yorkshire regiment.He was living with his sister,Margaret Johnson,at 61 Clarence Street,Haverton Hill,prior the the war.
    The last four men like so many of the battle have no known grave and are commemorated on the Thiepval memorial.

    Like

    • Private John Ashley & Private Thomas Williamson both served with the 10th Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment. on 1st July 1916 the 10th Battalion was tasked with attacking the German front line near the village of Fricourt. Artillery barrages, prior to, and during the battle failed to destroy German defenses. As the West Yorkshires attacked the enemy set up their machine guns and fired, decimating the Battalion. The casualties of the 10th Battalion for this day amounted to 22 officers and approximately 750 other ranks.

      Like

      • John Ashley was born in Winsford, Cheshire in 1888. He was one of fourteen children born to James & Ann Ashley. His parents moved the family to Haverton Hill around 1891 to work in the local salt industry. Originally they lived at Ash Street, Haverton Hill.
        In 1912 John Ashley married Emily Whitton. They had two children, Emily Ashley (born 1912) & John T Ashley (born 1914).

        Like

      • Thomas Williamson was born in Billingham in 1884. He was the son of George & Elizabeth Williamson. By 1901 Thomas, his widowed father, & siblings were living at Oak Street, Haverton Hill. I believe George Williamson died in 1904. Thomas was living with his brother in law and sister, Alice Margaret Johnson at the time of the 1911 census. He was employed as a labourer at an iron foundry.
        Thomas enlisted at Hartlepool. Disembarking in France with the 10th West Yorkshire Regiment on 13 July 1915. After Thomas’ death his sister Margaret Johnson received his “effects”.

        Like

      • Hi I am the great gran daughter of John Ashley and great grandaughter of Emily.. My nanna his Emily Ashley she was born in 1912. Do you have any more information about him and his family, never knew he had such a large family…

        Like

        • Hi I am a great grandson of John and Emily Ashley my father John Robert Ashley and his parents Jack and Florence I’m looking to find info on great uncle Jimmy brother to John

          Like

    • Albert Buckley was born in 1896 in Greatham. His parents parents had moved from Cheshire to work in the salt industry and by 1901 were living at Pearl street, Haverton Hill. Albert worked on the railway, as an engine cleaner, before enlisting in the army in July 1915. He disembarked in France with his regiment (The Rifle Brigade, 2nd battalion) in November 1915.
      On 1 July 1916 the 2nd battalion were at Ovillers La Boiselle, as part of the 8th Division. They were in reserve trenches, ready to assault the German positions, when they came under intense enemy artillery fire. The battalion suffered 133 killed or wounded on this day, nearly all from shell fire. Albert Buckley was among those killed.

      Like

    • Thomas Loughran was born in Port Clarence. One of eight children born to Thomas & Ann Jane Loughran. He worked at the nearby coke ovens before joining up with the Durham Light Infantry (15th battalion).
      On 1 July 1916 the 15th battalion were North of Fricourt as part of the British 21st Army Division. Prior to them attacking the Germans trenches a heavy barrage from British artillery was laid down to destroy the enemy defences. Unfortunately the Germans sat out the barrage in deep dugouts. When the barrage ceased the Germans re-emerged. As the British advanced over no mans land they were met with devastating machine gun fire. The 15th battalion sustained 440 casualties on this day.
      Thomas Loughran has no known grave. He was 26 years old. His name is inscribed on the Thiepval War Memorial along with his younger brother John Patrick Loughran.

      Like

    • Thomas Craby Jnr. was born in Port Clarence . He was one of nine children born to Thomas & Mary Ann Craby. Before the outbreak of war he had been a labourer at the nearby blast furnaces. He enlisted with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers (2nd battalion). Joining the battalion in France in December 1915.
      On 1 July 1916 the 2nd battalion were part of the British Army 4th Division. They were ordered to advance on the German front line near Beaumont- Hamel. The attack was met by heavy enemy machine gun fire. Of 23 officers & 480 men of the battalion who went into action 14 officers & 311 men became casualties.
      Thomas Craby would be among the dead. He has no known grave and is listed among the missing on the Thiepval War Memorial. He was 31 years years old.

      Like

  57. Private Stephen Tulip is one of twenty men, of the East Yorkshire regiment, who were killed in action on the 4th June 1916 and are buried together in Norfolk Cemetery, Bercodel-Bercourt in the Somme region.
    His parents William & Margaret Tulip lived at 4 Temperance Street, Haverton Hill. Mr & Mrs Tulip would also lose another son in the Great war, Joseph Tulip. He was killed in action in April 1918.

    Like

  58. 31 May 2016 marks the centenary of the Battle of Jutland. Two of the men named on this memorial lost their lives in the battle.
    Alfred Robinson Brammall was an Able Seaman on HMS Indefatigable. He had joined the Royal Navy prior to the outbreak of the war and was the son of Richard Brammall, who was the station master at Haverton Hill.
    Frank Burrows was a Stoker on HMS Broke.His mother was living at 8 Pearl Street, Haverton Hill in 1916.
    Both men were buried at sea and are commemorated on the Plymouth Naval Memorial.

    Like

    • HMS Indefatigable was a Royal Navy battlecruiser. During the Battle of Jutland she received hits from the German battlecruiser SMS Von der Tann. This led to Indefatigable`s magazines exploding, blowing up the ship. From a crew of 1,019 only two men survived.
      HMS Broke was a Royal Navy destroyer. She received hits from the German battleship Westfalen, killing 50 of Broke`s crew. Despite a collision with the destroyer HMS Sparrowhawk, and losing her bow, the Broke managed to limp back to England.
      6,097 British men and 2,551 Germans lost their lives during the battle.

      Like

    • Alfred Robinson Brammall was born at Haverton Hill in 1889. He was one of seven children born to Richard & Hannah Brammall. His parents had moved to Haverton Hill shortly before his birth. By 1891 Richard was the station master at Haverton Hill.
      Alfred joined the Royal Navy in 1906. Signing on for 12 years in 1907. After serving on a number of ships, including the light cruiser HMS Gloucester, he joined the battlecruiser HMS Indefatigable in June 1913.
      When the First World War began HMS Indefatigable was serving in the Mediterranean where she unsuccessfully pursued the German ships Breslau & Goeben. In November 1914 she bombarded Ottoman fortifications defending the Dardanelles. Following a refit at Malta HMS Indefatigable returned to Britain in February 1915.

      Like

    • Frank Burrows was born in Haverton Hill in 1888. His parents, Jonathon & Mary Ann Burrows moved to Haverton Hill shortly before Frank was born and lived at Oak Street. In 1895 Jonathon Burrows died and in 1896 Mary Ann married a Herbert Johnson. In 1901 they were still living at Oak Street, Haverton Hill.
      In 1909 Frank signed on for 5 years service in the Royal Navy. By 1914 he had been transferred to the Royal Fleet Reserve. With the outbreak of war he signed on for another seven years. In 1915 he married Florence S Meale. The marriage would be a short one. At the time of Franks death on 31 May 1916 Florence Burrows was living at 10 South View, Billingham.
      Franks elder brother Albert is also commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial. Albert was born in 1885. At which time the family were living at Norton. He also served in the Royal Navy and died in the Dardanelles in October 1915.

      Like

  59. Private James Knowles served with the Durham Light Infantry (2nd battalion).He was born in Haverton Hill, living at 9 Cottage Street.He would lose his life on 28 December 1915.
    He is commemorated on this memorial and is buried in Hop Store Cemetery.

    Like

    • James John Knowles had an eventful life. Born in January 1888 to Ellen & Thomas Knowles. By the age of 3 his father had died and his mother Ellen, with three young children, had married a William Blagg. the family at this time lived at 9 Cottage Street, Haverton Hill.
      In 1901 James J Knowles was found guilty of stealing a pair of boots and sentenced to three years in a reformatory school in West Yorkshire. The theft was probably out of desperation. His stepfather William had been unable to work for a while, due to bad eyes, and was in an infirmary in Leeds. Before the days of the welfare state I imagine the family would be struggling to put food on the table, never mind boots on their feet.
      At some point prior to 1911 John J Knowles enlisted in the army. On 1911 census he was serving at barracks in Colchester with the Durham light infantry. He would be among the earliest soldiers to take part in the Great War, his battalion, 2nd Durham Light infantry, disembarked in France on 8th September 1914.
      In December 1915 the 2nd battalion were East of Ypres in Belgium. They had gone into front line trenches on 15/16 December. On 18/19 December they came under a heavy enemy bombardment and gas attack. 8 men were killed, 21 wounded & 9 gassed. On 28 December the battalion HQ in Potijze Wood came under bombardment. 6 men were killed and 11 wounded. James J Knowles would die of wounds, from one of these attacks, on 28 December 1915. He is buried in Hop Store Cemetery near Ypres. During the war the area was used by British field Ambulances.
      His mother, Ellen Blagg, is listed as his next of kin. By this time she was living in Middlesbrough. There must have been some relative living in Haverton Hill in 19222 who put his name forward.

      Like

  60. Among the names on the memorial is a Patrick Towey. In 1911 he was living with his widowed mother at 6 Samphire Street, Port clarence. When the war came he volunteered as a Private with the Connaught Rangers, an Irish regiment.
    The Connaught Rangers saw action at Gallipoli before being sent to assist the Serbs fight the Bulgarians in what is now Macedonia. The Rangers were to suffer high casualties during this campaign, meeting the Bulgarians at the Battle of Kosturino in December 1915.
    Patrick Towey died around 7 December 1915. His body was not recovered and his name is commemorated on the Doira Memorial in northern Greece.

    Like

    • Patrick Towey was born in Middlesbrough in 1891. He was one of nine children born to Edward & Margaret Towey. His parents were originally from Ireland. They moved to Port Clarence around 1898 and Edward worked at the local blast furnace. Edward died in 1907, around the time Margaret gave birth to their youngest son, Michael. Prior to enlisting Patrick was a labourer at the blast furnaces.

      Like

  61. There is an O. Connolly commemorated on the memorial. Errors in the records,and on memorials themselves,sometimes make it difficult to find a particular individual. The closest match I can find for this person is an Owen Connolly.
    Military records,and those of the Commonwealth War Graves Commision,list an O.connolly who served as a Driver in the Royal Field Artillery. He died,in France,of wounds on 4th December 1915 and is buried in Nieppe Communal Cemetery. Other records list his mother as Harriet Battle.
    On the 1911 census for Haverton Hill there is a Harriet Battle living at 27 Oak Street. Her son named Owen Conley (spelling on census sheet) is also living there. Are there an ancestors out there who could confirm the identity ?

    Like

    • The variations of spellings in official records leads to some confusion but I believe the O. Connolly on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial is Owen Connolly. Driver. 63265. C battery. 113th Brigade. Royal Field Artillery.
      Owen Connolly had disembarked with his regiment in France on 26 September 1915. On 4 December 1915 the 113th Brigade were near Nieppe in France. Drivers from C battery were taking tea in huts when four shells from German heavy guns struck them. The huts caught fire. Two men were killed outright and 13 others were wounded. 5 of these would die in hospital. Owen Connolly was among the dead.
      Born Owen Connelly in 1896 in Hartlepool. His mother Harriet Connolly remarried to a Thomas Battle in Hartlepool in 1906. By 1911 the family were living in Haverton Hill.

      Like

  62. Frank McGee lived at 22 Cleveland Street, Port Clarence, prior to the outbreak of war. When war came he enlisted with the Yorkshire Regiment. He served with the regiment during the Gallipoli campaign. Like many who served during this campaign he was struck down not by bullets but by disease.
    He died 25 November 1915, on the Hospital Ship Aquitania, and was buried at sea. His name is remembered on this memorial and the Helles Memorial.

    Like

  63. There is an A.Burrows commemorated on the memorial, I believe it may be Albert Burrows, who died 29 October 1915.
    Albert was born in Norton-On-Tees, but was raised at 35 Oak street, Haverton Hill by his mother Mary and father Jonathon. By the time of the 1911 census he had married and was living in Middlesbrough. His war service records showed that he served with the Royal Naval Reserve aboard HMS Hythe.
    HMS Hythe was a former cross channel ferry which had been requisitioned by the government and turned into a minesweeper. She served in the Dardanelles. On the night of October 28/29 she was being used as a troop transport off Cape Helles when she was struck by the S.S. Sarnia. HMS Hythe sank with the loss of 155 men. Albert Burrows was among these.
    Albert left a wife, Mary,and two young sons. His mother may have still lived in Haverton Hill when the memorial was erected. Albert also had siblings and I believe the F. Burrows on this memorial may have been his brother Frank.
    Are there any ancestors still living in the area who could confirm these details?

    Like

    • Excerpts from the roll of honour, featured in the Daily Gazette of 17 July 1916.
      Albert Burrows, from HMS Hythe RNR, missing since October 29, 1915, now officially reported drowned. Age 31. Dearly beloved husband of Cissie Burrows, 1 Osbourne Street, Haverton Hill, late 59 Garnet Street, Middlesbrough. Ever remembered by his loving wife and children. Also son of Mrs Johnson, 8 Pearl street, Haverton Hill.
      There are a couple of clarifications to make to my previous comments. At the time of the 1901 census Albert was living with his mother and stepfather (Herbert Johnson) & his brother Frank at 35 Oak Street, Haverton Hill. By 1911 Albert had married Caroline Ann (not Mary) Sessions and they lived at 59 Garnet street, Middlesbrough. I don`t know if Cissie is an abbreviation.
      In these days of rapid communication it seems terrible that these families waited in hope for more than eight months before being notified of the sad news.

      Like

    • Albert Burrows was born in Norton-On-Tees in 1885. His parents Jonathon & Mary Ann Burrows moved to Haverton Hill, where Jonathon worked at the salt works, around 1888. Albert`s brother, Frank Burrows, was born in Haverton Hill in 1888. In 1891 the family were living at 35 Oak Street, Haverton Hill. Jonathon Burrows died at the age of 45 in 1895. Mary Ann Burrows married Herbert Johnson in 1896.
      In 1907 Albert Burrows married Caroline Annie Sessions. By 1911 Albert was working as a Fireman at a gas works and had two sons, Albert & Denis. In 1913 they had a daughter, Irene.
      Albert served with the Royal Naval Reserve as a Leading Trimmer. His job was to organise the loading of coal for the ships steam engines. On 28 October 1915 he was on board HMS Hythe which was being used to transport troops in the Dardanelles. On this day HMS Hythe was sailing From Mudros Bay to Cape Helles fully loaded with troops. The majority were from the 1/3rd Field Company, Kent Fortress, Royal Engineers. HMS Hythe had been a cargo ferry before the war and had no passenger accommodation. Most of the troops were gathered on the deck protected from the elements by an awning.
      At 2000 hours they were nearing their destination and the ship doused all her lights to avoid alerting the enemy. S.S. Sarnia meanwhile was steaming back from Cape Helles to Mudros on a collision course. The two ships collided, with the Sarnia slicing through the port side of HMS Hythe. The Hythe sunk rapidly. Most of the troops were not issued with life jackets. Burdened by kit and trapped by the deck awning many went down with the ship. The cook and a Midshipman from the Sarnia launched a boat and managed to pick up 80 survivors. 103 members of the 1/3rd Field Company would survive. Sadly in the tragedy the 1/3rd Field Company would lose one officer and 128 other ranks drowned. 15 other army personnel and 11 crew from the Hythe would also die.
      A court of enquiry would recommend that no soldier should travel on a ship without a life jacket.

      Like

  64. 2015 marks the centenary of the Battle Of Loos,which took place from 25 September to 14 October 1915.Some of the men commemorated on this memorial lost there lives in the battle.
    Private Joseph William Banner was the son of Rachael & John Banner of 27 New Cottages,Port Clarence. He served with Somerset Light Infantry and was killed 25 September 1915.
    Lance Corporal Richard Keenan was the son of John & Hannah Keenan of 1 Queens Terrace,Port Clarence. He served with the Durham Light infantry and was killed 25 September 1915.
    Private Peter Bradburn was the brother of Joseph Bradburn of 3 Ash Street,Haverton Hill.He served with the Grenadier Guards and was killed 29 September 1915.
    The bodies of these three were never recovered and as such there names are commemorated on the Loos Memorial.

    Like

    • I believe there is another casualty of the Battle Of Loos named on this memorial.
      Private Robert Smith served with the Northumberland Fusiliers (12th Battalion) and was killed on 28 September 1915.The 12th battalion participated in the battle and suffered heavy casualties.
      They managed to remove Robert Smith from the battlefield and he is buried in Lapugnoy Military Cemetery.
      He was the husband of Agnes Smith of 44 Belasis Avenue,Haverton Hill.

      Like

      • Private. 14913. Robert Smith was one of 481 casualties sustained by the Northumberland Fusiliers (12th battalion) at the Battle of Loos. He was wounded and later died at the 23rd Casualty Clearing Station at Lapugnoy.
        He was the son of James and Harriet Smith and was born in Newcastle. I have been unable to discover when he and his wife first arrived in Haverton Hill. He is recorded as having enlisted at Wallsend. Robert was 32 years old at the time of his death.

        Like

    • There is a J. Martin among the Great War dead commemorated on the memorial.The closest candidate I can find is Private James Martin who was killed at Loos on 26 September 1915.He served with the Yorkshire Regiment.He is among the missing named on the Loos Memorial.
      The National Railway Museum list of railway workers who died in the First World War has the same James Martin as a Freight Guard at Haverton Hill.

      Like

      • James Martin was born in Droitwich, Worcestershire. In 1911 he was living at Kingston street, Middlesbrough with his wife Louisa Alice Martin. James was a shunter for the North Eastern Railway Company. By 1914 James had been appointed as a freight guard at Haverton Hill. On the outbreak of war he joined up with the Yorkshire Regiment (2nd battalion). James disembarked with the regiment in France on 14 November 1914.
        Because Martin is such a common surname I cannot be 100% certain this is the J Martin on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence Memorial. I have been unable to discover if James Martin & his wive lived in Haverton Hill. By 1916 his widow had remarried to a Herbert Johnson in Middlesbrough.
        In 1911 there was also a James Martin living at South Road, Billingham. Which throws up another candidate.

        Like

    • Joseph William Banner was born at Port Clarence in 1890. By 1911 he was working as an analytical chemist at a steel works and living with his parents at 59 New Cottages, Port Clarence. In 1912 he married Beatrice Susan Clough. She lived nearby at Osbourne Terrace, Haverton Hill. He was one of the early volunteers for war service, but his time at the front line would be brief.
      On 8 September 1915 he disembarked in France with his regiment, the Somerset Light Infantry (8th Battalion). On 25 September 1915 they took part in the Battle Of Loos. As part of the British 63rd Brigade they were entrenched in an area known as Chalk Pit Wood. The regiments casualties on this day were light, mainly from German snipers. James William Banner would be one of those killed. He has no known grave.
      I don`t believe Joseph and Beatrice had any children together. In 1920 Beatrice Susan Banner married Sydney Vickers. They lived at Roscoe Road, Billingham.

      Like

      • On 2 November 1915 Beatrice S Banner placed a notice in the killed in action section of the North Eastern Daily Gazette. The notice for Private John William Banner, 8th Somerset LI, killed in action on September 25th 1915. Deeply mourned by his wife and children, Muriel and Joe. It also included a verse.
        O`er moor and fen
        O`er crag and torrent, till
        The night is gone
        And in the morn those angels faces smile
        Which I have loved long since and lost awhile
        This is part of a verse from a hymn written in 1833 by John Henry Newman called “Lead , Kindly Light”. It was often sung by British troops on the Western Front at services held before going into the trenches.
        Notably it was also sung by trapped Durham coal miners during the mining disaster at West Stanley Colliery, on16 February 1909. Over 150 men were killed but 30 men were rescued after being trapped for over 14 hours.
        It was sung in one of the lifeboats by survivors of the Titanic. During the Second World War a group of women sang it as they were led to the concentration camp at Ravensbruck. It was also one of the favourite hymns of Mahatma Gandhi.

        Like

    • The majority of casualties in the Great War happened outside of the major battles. In 1915 British soldiers were holding trenches from Loos in the South to Ypres in the North. Private Harry Purver was with the West Yorkshire regiment (1st battalion) in front line trenches at Ypres. The area was under constant bombardment by the Germans throughout the war. On 12 October 1915 the West Yorkshires came under a heavy artillery bombardment. Between 12 & 13 October the battalion suffered 3 killed and 16 wounded. There was an Advanced dressing station at Potijze Chateau, near Ypres, but many wounded would later die. Harry Purver would be one of these. He is buried at Potijze Burial cemetery.
      Harry Montagu Purver was born near York in 1881. By 1911 he was living at 18 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill with his wife, Mary Elizabeth Purver. He was a labourer at the salt works. They had two children. Muriel (born 1908 at Haverton Hill) and Raymond (born 1914). His wife would only be a widow for a short time. In 1917 she remarried to a Thomas Hatch.
      I believe Mary Elizabeth Hatch later moved to London but must have lived in the district long enough to nominate Harry Purver for inclusion on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence war Memorial.

      Like

  65. The death of all the men on this memorial would have been a tragedy to many families, but the death of young men in their teens seems all the more tragic. 2015 marks the death of two such young men named on the memorial.
    Private/Signaller George Davies was only 18 years old when died on 31 July 1915. He was serving with the Durham Light Infantry (10th Battalion) and was the son of Harry & Emma Davies who lived at 5 Cowpen Street, Port Clarence. He is buried in Sanctuary Wood cemetery.
    Private Frederick Copeland was 19 years old when he was killed on 19 September 1915.He was serving in the Yorkshire regiment (7th Battalion) and had lived with his parents at 1 Railway Terrace, Haverton Hill. His name is among the missing on the Ypres (Menin Gate) memorial.

    Like

    • Martin
      Fascinating history of the war memorial.
      George Davies was my great uncle, I visited his grave with my father in Ypres on the 31st July 2015 which was the 100th anniversary of his death.

      Like

    • George Davies` period of active service was very brief. He had disembarked in France with his regiment as part of the 43rd Infantry Brigade, 14th (Light) Division on 21 May 1915. They moved up to Ypres in Belgium and by 30 July 1915 were at the village of Hooge, East of Ypres. The village had recently been captured by the British and on 30 July 1915 the Germans launched an attack to recapture Hooge. The attack saw the first use, against the British, of a new German terror weapon, the flame thrower. The 14th Division were forced back. This was followed on 31 July by an intense German artillery bombardment. “A” company of the 10th Durham Light Infantry suffered heavily. George Davies would be among those killed.
      George was born in Middlesbrough but around 1902 his family moved to Port Clarence to work in the iron & steel works. George became a painter at the steel works. In 1911 they were living at 5 Martin street, Port Clarence. Which I believe was located within the Clarence Iron Works. A lot of the houses were “back to backs”. This seems to be the case with 5 Martin Street. On the census it is recorded as being comprised of only two rooms. George, his parents and seven siblings (10 people) lived in these two rooms.
      A lot of men had volunteered for the army to escape dreary lives and poverty. The army offered a chance of adventure. Most of the recruits were better fed than ever before in their lives and increased in height and weight. As with George Davies the adventure could very quickly end. In these days of the welfare state most of us should be thankful we do not have to endure the short, poverty stricken, life that many who made the ultimate sacrifice did.

      Like

    • Frederick Copeland died very shortly after his disembarkation in France on 13 July 1915. By September 1915 the Yorkshire Regiment (7th battalion) were in front line trenches at Voormezeele, south of Ypres, Belgium. On the 19th September 1915 they were relieved by the 7th Lincolns. Whilst they were being guided into the trenches a German minenwerfer shell exploded causing 7 casualties among the Lincolns and killing 1 man of the 7th Yorks. I believe this was Frederick Copeland. Unfortunatey he has no known grave.
      Frederick Copeland Jnr. was born in Stockton. He originally lived with his parents, Frederick & Elizabeth Ann Copeland at Bath Street, Stockton. By 1911 they were living at The Green, Billingham. Frederick snr. was a boiler smith at a locomotive depot. Which may be why their future address was Railway Terrace, Haverton Hill.
      The loss of his son would further add to the grief Frederick was already suffering. His wife Elizabeth Ann had passed away in 1914.

      Like

  66. 25 April 2015 marks the centenary of the death of Private 2388, Patrick Devlin ,4th battalion Yorkshire regiment.He died at Ypres.His body was never recovered and his name is commemorated on the Menin Gate,Ypres.He enlisted at Middlesbrough, and Port Clarence was given as his residence.
    I believe this may be the P. Devlin, who is commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence war Memorial.Are there any ancestors of Patrick Devlin who could confirm this?

    Like

    • Private 2388 P. Devlin was Patrick Devlin who was born in Port Clarence around 1884. He was the son of Patrick & Sarah Devlin, who had emigrated from Ireland. In 1901 the family were living at Bell Brothers Cottages, High Clarence. Patrick had a number of siblings but it appears by 1911 the family had broken up. Both his parents appear to have died, Patrick was working at a steelworks at Skinningrove, and his sister, Mary was working in Darlington. By the time of the outbreak of the Great war Patrick must have moved back to Port Clarence.
      On the 25th April 1915, as part of the Yorkshire Regiment (4th battalion), he was taking part in the Battle of St. Julien (24 April – 5 May 1915). The regiment didn`t suffer heavy casualties, indeed on the 25th, whilst in trenches at Potijze, South of St. Julien, there was only one fatality, which seems to have been Patrick Devlin. In the register of soldiers effects his next of kin was listed as sister Mary.
      The battle was part of the Second Battle Of Ypres, in Western Belgium. This battle saw the first large scale use of poison gas by Germany on the Western front. In its initial use 170 tons of chlorine gas were released towards french troops causing 6,000 casualties. The 2nd Royal Dublin Fusiliers were subjected to a gas attack near St. Julien, on 24 April, suffering heavy casualties.
      Gas masks had not been introduced at this stage of the war. Prior to their introduction. troops were issued with a cotton face pad which when soaked in urine was meant to neutralise the gas.

      Like

  67. Today marks the centenary of British declaration of war against Germany. What became known as the Great War and later the First World War would lead to millions of deaths in theatres of war across the globe. The number of military personnel from the United Kingdom who died was 702,917,according to the 1922 War Office statistics. Ninety four of these deaths are recorded on this memorial. Each name would have left behind a mother, father, wife, child, brother or sister. It is fitting that in this centenary year we make an extra effort to remember those who sacrificed everything.

    Tonight there is a request that people light a candle or turn of all but one of their lights as a mark of commemoration.

    Like

    • 20 October 2014 marks the centenary of the death of Private Thomas Carr,who lived in Port Clarence,prior to his enlistment.His regiment,2nd Battalion,The Yorkshire Regiment,participated in the First Battle Of Ypres,which commenced 12 October 1914.
      The 2nd Battalion arrived in Ypres on 14 October,taking up an exposed position,in trenches,to the East of the village of Gheluvelt.For three weeks they were under heavy bombardment and repeated attacks by German artillery and infantry.The battalion suffered heavy losses but remained in there positions until ordered to retire on the 30th October.
      On 6 November 1914 what was left of the 2nd Battalion Yorkshire Regiment marched into Locre.A description by an officer present gives some idea of what they had endured.
      “They had three weeks` growth of beard and dirt on their faces.Their eyes were sunken far into their heads.They had not had their boots off for over three weeks;had been under hellish fire practically the whole of the time,subjected day and night to continual attacks which they had always repulsed.”
      Thomas Carr was one of the many killed.In the carnage of the battle his body was not recovered and his name is listed on the Ypres (Menin Gate) war Memorial.
      I don`t know which relative received the news of his death(his parents John & Margaret Carr are listed in Commonwealth war Graves records as deceased).At this early stage of the war the reaction in Port Clarence was probably pride at the sacrifice of one of their own for a worthy cause.Unfortunately in the coming years many more inhabitants of Haverton Hill and Port Clarence would receive sad news.

      Like

      • Between 1914 and 1918 more than 65,000 men joined the Yorkshire Regiment.By the end of the war 12 Victoria Crosses had been awarded;9,000 men had been killed and 24,000 wounded.
        The Green Howards Museum in Richmond is running an exhibition centered on the First Battle Of Ypres.The exhibition runs from 9 November until April 1915.

        Like

    • 25 April 2015 marks the centenary of the landings which began the Gallipoli campaign ,during the First World War.A ceremony ,attended by the Queen ,has taking place today ,at the Cenotaph in whitehall,London.
      25,000 British,10,000 French,10,000 Anzac & 86,000 Turkish troops lost their lives during the campaign.
      The Helles memorial ,near Sedd el Bahr ,Turkey is the Commonwealth Battle Memorial for the whole Gallipoli campaign and commemorates 20,885 Commonwealth servicemen who died there and have no known grave.
      Among these are soldiers whose names are commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence War Memorial.
      Private Edward George Wood ,Worcestershire Regiment ,died 4 June 1915.
      Private Reuben Pemberton ,Hampshire Regiment ,died 13 September 1915.
      Private Frank McGee ,Yorkshire Regiment ,died 25 November 1915.

      Like

      • Also commemorated on the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence Memorial, as well as the Helles memorial, is Private James O’Brien. He served with the Yorkshire Regiment (6th battalion). He died in the Dardenelles, 21 August 1915, aged 23. He was the son of William & Elizabeth O’Brien, who lived at 36 New Cottages, Port Clarence.

        Like

        • James O`Brien was born in Stockton-On-Tees. He was eldest of ten children born to William & Elizabeth O`Brien. The family moved to Port Clarence some time after 1902. Prior to enlisting James worked as a locomotive fireman at the nearby blast furnaces.
          On 6 August 1915 seven hundred and seventy five men of the Yorkshire Regiment (6th battalion) disembarked at Gallipoli. They were involved in attacks on Turkish positions on the 6th & 21st August. By 22nd August the regiment only had 265 men fit for duty. On 23rd August 1915 they had to amalgamate with the west Riding Regiment.

          Like

      • Private Reuben Pemberton served with the 2nd battalion of the Hampshire Regiment. He was the son of Joseph & Elizabeth Pemberton who lived at 50 Elm Street, Haverton Hill. I don’t know if he had any family ties to Hampshire.
        By the time of his death on 13 September 1915 the battle for Gallipoli was at a stalemate, no major battles took place during this period and the biggest cause of casualties was the atrocious conditions. The heat and plagues of flies attracted by the many corpses that couldn’t be buried led to outbreaks of dysentery and typhoid. It is estimated that 145,000 British soldiers were effected by sickness during the campaign.

        Like

        • Reuben Pemberton was born in Haverton Hill in 1892. His parents had moved from Cheshire to work in the districts salt industry. Before the war Reuben had been a bricklayers labourer at the salt works.
          The reason Reuben served with the Hampshire Regiment (2nd battalion) is because the battalion had been fighting at Gallipoli, as part of the 29th Division, since April 1915 and had suffered severe losses. On 6 august 1915 alone they sustained 461 casualties. On 28 July 1915 Reuben along with 1,366 officers and men, the majority of whom were reinforcements for the 29th Division, embarked from England on the troop ship HMT Royal Edward. Unfortunately they were never to reach their destination.
          On 13 September 1915 the Royal Edward was approaching the Dardanelles, 6 miles off the island of Kandeloussa, when she was struck by two torpedoes fired from the German submarine UB-14. The ship sank in 6 minutes. 660 men were rescued but modern research puts the death toll, including the ships crew, at 935. Reuben Pemberton was among those drowned.

          Like

      • I believe there is another soldier who is commemorated on both the Helles
        War Memorial and the Haverton Hill & Port Clarence war Memorial. T. Evans is the soldier in question. unfortunately no regiments or service numbers are given on this memorial which would confirm this 100%.
        Private 11713. Tom Evans served with the Kings Own Royal Lancaster Regiment. He died at Gallipoli on 8 August 1915. His mother , Emma Warburton, was living at 9 Ash Street, Haverton Hill. Tom was born in Fleetwood, Lancashire about 1892. His Father, Robert Evans was originally from Over, Cheshire and was a salt worker. The family moved around quite a bit. Two of Tom`s older siblings were born in Haverton Hill. After living in Fleetwood, by 1898 they were living in Middlesbrough. Some time between 1901 & 1906 Tom`s father died. His mother, Emma Evans, married William Warburton and by 1911 they were living at 9 Ash Street. Tom moved to Middlewich, Cheshire, before 1911. Where he worked in an alkali works.
        I don`t know if he returned to the North East at any point. His mother was residing in Haverton Hill and would probably have put his name forward for inclusion on this memorial.

        Like

    • 4 June 2015 marks the centenary of the death of Edward George Wood, who is commemorated on this memorial.
      Born in Wollaston, Worcestershire,he and his wife,Trew Hannah Wood, moved to Haverton Hill some time between 1911 and 1914. They lived at 26 Pearl Street prior to the outbreak of the Great War. By profession he was a moulder, probably working at the ironworks at Port Clarence.
      In September 1914, at the age of 38,he enlisted in the army at Middlesbrough.
      He served as a Private with the Worcestershire Regiment (4th Battalion). In April 1915 the regiment formed part of an expeditionary force that was sent to Galliopli.
      The Worcestershire regiment would suffer terrible losses during the campaign. Out of a battalion of 900 men over 700 would become casualties.
      Edward George Wood was killed at the Third Battle of Krithia on 4 June 1915. He left a wife and seven sons. His body was never recovered and he is commemorated on the Helles War Memorial.

      Like

  68. James Mellon served with the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (9th battalion).He died 22 March 1918,age 23,and is remembered on the Pozieres memorial.He was born Port Clarence and was the son of the Late Neal and Margaret Mellon.
    A James Mellon,age 16,living at 14 Martin Street,Port Clarence,appears on the 1911 census.His widowed mother is named Margaret Mellon.Can anyone confirm the link between the two?

    Like

  69. Whilst researching the names of the men on the memorial,who died in the Great War,I have come across a fair amount of information that gives you a feeling of what the area was like prior to the outbreak of war.
    Kelly`s 1914 trade directory of County Durham describes Haverton Hill as a village and ecclesiastical parish, formed out of the parish of Billingham,on 4th November 1862.The parish comprised Haverton Hill,Port Clarence,Saltholme and Cowpen Bewley.
    Places of worship included the church of Saint John the Evangelist,Haverton Hill (erected in 1865),a temporary iron church at Port Clarence (where the vicar of Haverton Hill officiated on Sundays),St Thomas` Catholic church at Port Clarence (erected in 1879) and a number of Wesleyan,primitive Methodist and united Methodist Chapels.
    The main employers were Bell Brothers Ltd,Clarence Ironworks:The Salt Union Limited (South Durham Salt Works,Haverton Hill & Clarence Salt works),United Alkali Company Ltd (Tennant`s Salt works,Haverton Hill & Allhusen Salt Works,Port Clarence): Anderson Foundry Company Ltd,Port Clarence:Casebourne & company Ltd,Pioneer cement Works,Haverton Hill & The Coal Distillation company,Port Clarence.These industries attracted workers from elsewhere in the United kingdom & Ireland.
    There were three schools;Haverton Hill (built in 1867):High Clarence (built 1909) & St. Thomas` Catholic,Port Clarence.Haverton Hill and Port Clarence both had their own railway stations but the roads from Saltholme Terrace,Port Clarence to seaton Carew & from Clarence Street,Haverton Hill to Cowpen Bewley were just being built.
    In 1914 the population of the parish was 4,243.During the Great War 94 men from the parish would give there life and be recorded on the memorial. In such a small community there can`t have been many people who didn`t lose a relative or friend.

    Like

    • In 1914 the eastern side of Haverton Hill was dominated by two large salt works (the South Durham Salt Works and Tennants` Salt Works).I believe the adjoining streets (Ash,Oak and Elm Street) were built to house the salt workers.Many of the workers were emigrants.On the 1911 census a number of workers have there place of birth recorded as Winsford,Cheshire.Winsford had its own salt industry but in 1892 its salt mine was closed.Some of the men from Winsford moved to Haverton Hill to seek employment.One such man was Reuben Oakes who`s address was 40 Ash Street.Living with him was his wife (Margaret),3 sons (Vivian,Joe and John) and 2 daughters (Alice and Ivy) all of whom were born in Winsford.Reuben is recorded as having had 12 children (one of whom had died by the time of the census).The Haverton Hill war memorial has two men named Oakes commemorated among the Great War dead.I wonder if anyone is able to confirm the link between these two men and Reuben Oakes?

      Sergeant Charles Oakes served with the 12th battalion Durham Light Infantry.He was born Winsford,Cheshire and died 11 April 1918 (age 24?).He is buried in La Kreuze military Cemetery,Hazebrouck.The other soldier,Frank Oakes may be Charles` brother.Gunner Frank Oakes served with the 1st Brigade Royal Field Artillery.He was born winsford,Cheshire.He died 25 October 1918 at Salonika and is buried in the Mikra British Cemetery,Kalamaria.Both of these men are also listed on the Albert Park War Memorial,Middlesbrough.

      It is not unusual to find the same men commemorated on different memorials.It was usually relatives who put the names forward for inclusion on a memorial.If the named person had moved town or his relatives lived in a different location he could be on more than one memorial.

      Like

      • On the 1911 census a William Turner was living at 24 Oak Street,Haverton Hill.He was a salt worker,age 44,born Knutsford,Cheshire.Living with him were five sons,the two eldest of whom were born in Winsford,cheshire,and a daughter.Can anyone confirm a link between him and the W.Turner who is commemorated on this memorial?
        One of his sons was also a William Turner,aged 13 and born in Billingham.

        Like

      • Private John Ashley was born Winsford,Cheshire but was living in Haverton Hill when he signed up for military service.He served with the West Yorkshire Regiment (10th battalion) and died 1 July 1916.He is buried in the Fricourt New Military Cemetery.

        Like

    • Dorman Long & Co. Ltd also had a business in Port Clarence, established before the war. At the beginning of the war the workers set up the Dorman Long & Co. Ltd Port Clarence Mill & Rail Bank Fund. This was for the wives and dependents of workers who had joined the Army or Navy. Workmen at Port Clarence agreed to pay 3d out of every pound to the fund.
      By 11 September 1916, 75 wives & dependents & 137 children were receiving money from the fund. 3s 6d per week for wives & dependents and 6d for each child. A sum of £1,352 had been contributed by this time.

      Like

  70. Sadly the signing of the Armistice on 11 November 1918 didn`t mean an end to the dying. In the following months and years men and women would continue to die from the wounds and gassing they had received during the war. Many weakened by the ravages of war would also succumb to the Spanish flu epidemic. Some would never make it home.

    Driver Thomas Shute of the Royal Field Artillery died 24 December 1918, aged 28. He is buried in the Charleroi Communal Cemetery. He left a widow, Mary Shute of 4 Cottage Street, Haverton Hill.

    Like

    • There are a number of military headstones in St. John`s churchyard, Haverton Hill, from both world wars. Among the First World War graves are the following men; some of whom died after the war; 3rd Clerk W. Fox, Royal Air Force who died 27 September 1918, age 27; Gunner E.Pemberton, Royal Field Artillery,died 9 August 1919, age 44; Gunner J.W. Griffin, Royal Field Artillery, died 26 December 1919; Sergeant P. Hanna, Yorkshire Regiment, died 25 March 1920, age 28.

      Like

    • Sergeant P. Archer served with the Royal Field Artillery.He died 9 November 1917,age 24.He was the son of Esther (Hughf ?),formerly Archer,of 4 Railway Terrace,Haverton Hill.He is buried in Track X Cemetery.

      Like

    • Bombardier Albert Cattermole served with the Royal field artillery.He died 12 October 1917 and is buried in the Karasouli Military Cemetery,Greece.He was born Haverton Hill.
      On the 1911 census there is a Albert Cattermole,age 16,living at 39 Elm Street,Haverton Hill with his father,Gates J Cattermole,and his mother,Elizabeth Cattermole.Can anyone confirm a link between these two?

      Like

      • Whilst I agree that the name written in the 1911 census does appear to be Gates J Cattermole, it is in fact Geater Jay Cattermole and his wife was Elizabeth Martha Ann Cattermole (Nee Hartell). I can confirm that Geater and Elizabeth were the parents of Bombardier James Albert Cattermole, born 1897 in Haverton Hill, enlistment location Stockton-on-Tees. Regiments Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery, regiment number 27494, Rank BDR, the theatre of war was the Balkan theatre. Killed at Salonika 12th October 1917 after 3.5 years active service aged 23 years.

        My paternal great grandmother was Sarah Ann Jay Smith (nee Cattermole) and she was an elder sibbling of Greater Jay Cattermole.

        I hope this answers your question.

        Like

      • Thank you for the confirmation of Albert Cattermole`s details, and the added information,Graham. Although Albert is buried in Greece I believe his name is included on the family headstone in St John`s churchyard,Haverton Hill.

        Like

  71. Private Bertram Redhead served with the West Yorkshire Regiment (9th Battalion).He died 5 December 1917,age 25. He was the son of Martha redhead of 13 Windsor Street, Haverton Hill. He is buried in St. Patricks Cemetery,Loos.

    Like

    • Thank you Martin, I will add this information to my genealogy file. Martha Redhead was the daughter of Suzannah Johnson who was Landlady at the 3 Horseshoes Pub in Cowpen Village for 5 decades, and was my grandmother, Elizabeth Laing/nee Irwin’s, g-aunt. The 1901 census shows Levi Redhead at the pub – he would have been Bertram’s brother.

      I have read all of your entries, they are so interesting – you have put a lot of work and effort into your research!!

      Like

  72. Private Joseph Maddock served with the East Yorkshire Regiment (7th Battalion).He died 31 March 1918,age 23.He left a young widow,Elizabeth Maddock,and was the son of Adam & Mary Maddock of 2 Saltholme Terrace,Port Clarence.He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.

    Like

    • Private James Sankey served with the East Yorkshire Regiment (11th battalion). He died 8 September 1918 and is buried in Trois Arbres Cemetery Steenweck. I believe he may be the son of James Sankey, who was living at 25 Oak street, Haverton Hill on the 1911 census.

      Like

  73. William Rowe served as a Rifleman with the Rifle Brigade (10th Battalion). He died 19th February 1917, age 21 and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial. His mother lived at 47 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill.

    Like

    • Rifleman Clifford French served with the Rifle Brigade (13th Battalion).He died 14 November 1916,age 20,and was the son of Alice french of 12 Saltholme Terrace,Port Clarence. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

      Like

      • Clifford French was one of the early volunteers for war service. He enlisted at West Hartlepool in September 1914. He was age 19 years and 60 days and born Cowpen Bewley on his attestation paper. Initially he served with the Rifle brigade (12th battalion). Embarking in France in July 1915. He must have suffered badly from psoriasis as he was hospitalised with the condition in August 1915. Eventually being sent back to England where he would spend 98 days in hospital. After release he was posted to the Rifle Brigade (13th battalion).It was whilst serving with the 13th battalion that, on 14 November 1916, he was killed during an attack on German trenches near Hedauville.
        Prior to enlisting Clifford had been a blacksmiths labourer. His father Thomas had moved, like many others, to Port Clarence from the west of England to work in the salt industry. Clifford had a number of brothers one of whom, Stanley French, served with the Durham light Infantry during the war.

        Like

    • Rifleman George William Bolton served with the Rifle Brigade (10th Battalion).He died 3 September 1916,age 20.He was the son of James and Jane Bolton of 65 Clarence Street,Haverton Hill.He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial

      Like

      • George William Bolton was born in Haverton Hill in 1897. he was one of nine children born to James & Jane Bolton. On 15 June 1915 he enlisted at Middlesbrough Town Hall. The Day before another resident of Haverton Hill, William Rowe, had also enlisted at the Town Hall. Both men were young, George William Bolton 18 & William Rowe 19. Both also gave their professions as steel works labourers. If not friends they were probably work mates. They were allocated the service numbers S/13080 & S/13081 and posted to the Rifle Brigade (10th battalion). On 1 October 1915 they disembarked together in France.
        On 3 September 1916 they both took part in the Battle of Guillemont. This was an attack on German positions near the village of the same name. Between 3rd & 4th September 1916 the 10th battalion would suffer 290 casualties. 41 other ranks were killed, 195 wounded & 54 missing. George William Bolton was among the missing. He was never seen again.
        William Rowe was among the wounded. He would recover but would be killed in action near Guillemont on 19 February 1917.

        Like

    • Rifleman James walter Holmes served with the Rifle Brigade (12th battalion). He died 6 June 1916.He was born in Billingham but was living in Port Clarence at the time he signed up for service.

      Like

    • Rifleman James Bateman served with the Rifle Brigade (8th battalion).He died 15 September 1916.He was residing in Haverton Hill at the time he signed up for service.

      Like

      • Martin,

        The battle he was killed in was Flers. I have a copy of the War Diaries for that period and some other information about the battle. The information about my ancestor William James Robinson is on “www.wartimememoriesproject.com”. He died on the same day in the same battle so the information will be applicable to James Bateman.

        I have found a T.Bateman ‘C’ Company (service number S13388). This could very well be James if it is the correct service number. I have found several rifleman with the wrong ‘initials’ (including my ancestor). I can’t find any other Bateman killed in September 1916 in the Diary casualty list.

        Malcolm Robinson

        Like

  74. Two of those remembered on the memorial served with the Royal Engineers. Lance Corporal Richard Dudley was with the 95th Field Company when he was killed on 22 December 1916. He is recorded as a native of Port Clarence, but at the time of his death his parents were living at 6 Victoria Terrace, Stockton-On-Tees. He was 29 years old and is buried at the Mailly wood Cemetery. Sapper Joseph Thomas Monaghan was the son of Thomas and Mary Ann Monaghan of Port Clarence. He died 20 June 1918 and is buried at the Contay British Cemetery.

    Like

  75. understandably a large proportion of the names on the memorial served with local regiments but there are also names of soldiers who served with less obvious regiments. I don`t know if this was because they were originally from a different part of the country or if they were sent to regiments that were depleted by casualties. Private Joseph William Banner served with the Somerset Light Infantry (8th battalion). He was the son of John and Rachel Ann Banner of 27 New Cottages, Port Clarence. He died 25 September 1915. He is remembered on the Loos Memorial.

    Like

    • Private George Edward Wood served with the Worcestershire Regiment (4th Battalion). He died 4th June 1915, aged 39. He is also remembered on the Helles Memorial. His wife remarried and her details are given as T.H. Sproston of 8 Victoria street, Haverton Hill.

      Like

    • Private Reuben Pemberton served with the Hampshire Regiment. He was the son of Joseph and Elizabeth Pemberton of 50 Elm Street, Haverton Hill. He died 13th August 1915, aged 23. He is remembered on the Helles Memorial.

      Like

    • Private John Edward Gibbon served with the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (1/5th Battalion). He left a wife, Edith Eleanor Gibbon of Bridge Street, Haverton Hill. He died 30 November 1917 at the Battle of Cambrai and is remembered on the Cambrai Memorial, Louveral.

      Like

    • Private Thomas Craby served with the Royal Dublin Fusiliers (2nd Battalion). He died 1 July 1916. Port Clarence is given as his birthplace and residence. He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial.

      Like

    • Private Patrick Towey served with the Connaught Rangers (5th Battalion). He died 7 December 1915 at Salonika and is remembered on the Doiran Memorial, Northern Greece. His place of residence was given as Port Clarence.

      Like

    • Private Peter Bradburn served with the Grenadier Guards (1st Battalion). He was killed in action 29 September 1915, age 27. He was the brother of Joseph Bradburn of 3 Ash Street,Haverton Hill and is remembered on the Loos Memorial.

      Like

      • My Great Grand father is registered as being a boarder at No. 1 Hope St. with the head being Thomas Bradburn (then aged 55 in the 1911 census). Is there any connection ?

        Like

  76. Another local Regiment which has men listed on the memorial is the Alexandra, Princess Of Wales Own Yorkshire Regiment. In addition to John Hanna there are Thomas Carr and John Carr. Private Thomas Carr (2nd Battalion) is one of the earliest casualties on the memorial, he was killed 22nd is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial.Private John Carr (9th Battalion) was killed 10 July 1916 aged 33. Born Port Clarence, his parents,Owen & Bridget Carr were also deceased. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial. I don`t no if these two were in any way related.

    Like

    • Just to clarify Private Thomas Carr`s details, he died 22nd October 1914 aged 28. John Hanna`s brother Patrick served with the Yorkshire Regiment as well, and is named on this memorial. Also from the Yorkshire Regiment are Private Frederick Copeland (7th Battalion),he died 19th September 1915 aged 19. He was the son of Mr F and Mrs E.A. Copeland of 1 Railway terrace, Haverton Hill and is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial. Private Frank McGee (6th Battalion), died 25th November 1915 aged 22. He was the son of John McGee of 7 Church Street, Port Clarence. He is commemorated on the Helles Memorial.

      Like

    • Corporal Olous Edward Daniel, 9th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment, was the son of Oscar and Mary Daniel of 4 Victoria Street, Haverton Hill. He died 16 October 1917,aged 22. He is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

      Like

    • Private Thomas Nichols Archer served with the Yorkshire Regiment (12th Battalion). He died 17 June 1918,age 38,and was the son of John Jones Archer and Harriet Ann Archer of 10 Young Street,Haverton Hill. He is buried in the Etaples Military Cemetry.

      Like

    • Private Frank Newby Helm was killed 25 October 1918 whilst serving with the Yorkshire Regiment (9th battalion). He was the son of Charles and Janet Helm of 27 Elm Street, Haverton Hill. Age 20 at the time he is buried in the Premont British Cemetery.

      Like

  77. Two of the First World War soldiers commemorated on the memorial served with the Northumberland Fusiliers (12th Battalion). Private Robert Smith died 28th September 1915, aged 32. He was the husband of Agnes Smith of 44 Belasis Avenue, Haverton Hill. He is buried in Lapugnoy Military Cemetry, Pas De Calais, France. Private Patrick Lavey died 13th July 1916, aged 26. He was the brother of Thomas Lavey of 9 Lothian Terrace, Port Clarence. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.

    Like

  78. Able seaman Ernest Robson Smith served on the Royal Navy cruiser HMS Crescent, he died 23 October 1918 aged 26. He was the son of Charles Edward Smith and Mary Smith of 41 Clarence Street, Haverton Hill. HMS Crescent was a depot ship based at Rosyth. He is buried in Edinburgh (Seafield) cemetery.

    Like

  79. Engine room artificer 4th class Joseph Duncan was one of 15 men lost on the Royal Navy sloop HMS Rhododendron. On 5th May 1918 she was torpedoed and sunk in the North Sea by German submarine U-70. Joseph was age 37 and left behind a wife, Jenny Duncan of 47 Cowpen Road, Haverton Hill. He is also remembered on the Chatham Naval Memorial. HMS Rhododendron had been built in 1917 by Irvines Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. Ltd, West Hartlepool.

    Like

  80. Other soldiers who served with the Durham Light Infantry and are named on the memorial; include – Private John Robert Christopher (18th Battalion), who died 12th November 1916 in France. In Flanders; Lance Corporal Arthur Appleton Waller (18th Battalion), who died 3rd March 1917 and Lance Corporal P. Barker (10th Battalion), who died 14th May 1917.

    Like

    • Private John Robert Christopher was born in Hutton Henry but was residing in Haverton Hill before the war.He is buried in Hebuterne Military Cemetery in the Somme region of France.
      Lance Corporal Arthur Appleton Waller was the Son of John & Sarah Waller of Haverton Hill.He is buried in the Varennes Military Cemetery,Pas De Calais,France.
      Lance Corporal P. Barker was the son of Barbara Barker living at 7 Victoria Street,Haverton Hill.He is buried in Wancourt British Cemetery,Pas De Calais,France

      Like

  81. Brothers Richard and Francis Keenan are named on the memorial, both served with the Durham Light Infantry. Lance Corporal Richard Keenan,15th Battalion Durham Light Infantry ,died 25 September 1915,age 32. Private Francis Keenan, 10th Battalion Durham Light Infantry, died 23 August 1917,age 35.They were the sons of John and Hannah Keenan of 1 Queens Terrace, Port Clarence.

    Like

    • Sadly neither of their bodies were recovered from the battlefield. Richard Keenan is commemorated on the Loos Memorial and Francis Keenan is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

      Like

  82. Brothers John and Patrick Hanna are named on the monument, both served with the Yorkshire Regiment. Private John Hanna,9th Battalion Yorkshire Regiment died 8 August 1916, age30. Serjeant Patrick Hanna,3rd Battalion Yorkshire Regiment died 25 March 1920, age28.They were the sons of James and Alice Hanna, 25 New Cottages,Port Clarence.

    Like

    • Sadly John Hanna`s body was never recovered from the battlefield. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial. Patrick Hanna survived the war despite being wounded three times. These wounds may have contributed to his early death. He is buried with a military headstone in St John`s churchyard,Haverton Hill.

      Like

  83. Walter and Annie Batey of 31, Oak Street, Haverton Hill lost two sons in the Great War. Wilfred Batey was a private in the Durham Light Infantry (12th Battalion). He died 7 June 1917,age 21. His brother,Arthur Batey, a private in the South Staffordshire Regiment was killed in action on 21 March 1918, age 20.

    Like

    • Wilfred Batey died in the Battle Of Ypres. His body was never recovered from the battlefield and his name is recorded on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. Arthur Batey is buried in the H.A.C Cemetery,Ecoust-St.Mein.In the Pas De Calais region of France.

      Like

  84. There are possibly (although I haven`t been able to confirm it through military records) another two brothers named on the memorial. Frank Burrows aged 27, was in the Royal Navy serving as a Stoker aboard HMS Broke. He died on 31 May 1916, leaving a widow, Florence S. Burrows of 10 South View, Billingham.
    Frank was born in Haverton Hill circa 1889, I have confirmed Frank’s details but wondered if anyone could verify his connection to the following soldier: Albert Arthur Burrows, born in Haverton Hill circa 1886. He was a private with the Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment). Whilst serving in France he was taken prisoner of war and spent the next 4 years and 3 months as a POW. On his repatriation he volunteered for service in Russia where he was killed on 13 September 1919. His parents were Walter and Sarah Burrows.
    I would be interested if there are any descendants of either men who could offer some information.

    Like

    • Frank Burrows was Killed at the Battle of Jutland (31 May to 1 June 1916). He was one of 47 seamen killed on the British destroyer HMS Broke when she was shelled by German warships. He is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial.

      Like

      • There is an A. Brammall named on the memorial, among the Great War dead. The closest match I can find is a Alfred Robinson Brammall. He served with the Royal Navy as an Able Seaman aboard the battlecruiser HMS Indefatigable. On 31st May 1916 he was one of 1,017 seamen killed aboard this ship at the Battle of Jutland. I haven`t yet found a Haverton Hill or Port Clarence connection. Is there anyone out there with further information?

        Like

    • Name: Albert Arthur Burrows, Birth Place: Brixton, Residence: Pinston, Death Date: 13 Sep 1919, Death Location: Russia, Enlistment Location: Nottingham, Rank: Private, Regiment: Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), Battalion: 46th Battalion, Number: 130850, Type of Casualty: Killed in action, Theatre of War:
      Russian Theatre, Comments: Formerly 2/12156, Notts And Derby Regt.

      Like

    • 130850, PRIVATE ALBERT ARTHUR BURROWS – 46th Battalion., Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)
      Killed in action, Russia, 13/9/1919, Born: Brixton, Enlisted: Nottingham, FORMERLY 2/12156, NOTTS AND DERBY REGT.

      Like

    • Due to the lack of military records it can be some times difficult to match a person to the name recorded on a memorial.Another candidate for A. Burrows could be a Albert Burrows,born Norton,Durham circa 1886.On the 1911 census his widowed mother,Mary Ann (Johnson?),was living at 8 Pearl Street,Haverton Hill.On the 1901 census Albert,his brother Frank, mother and stepfather were living at 35 Oak street,Haverton Hill.An internet source links him to a Albert Burrows who died aboard HMS Hythe on 29 October 1915.

      Like

  85. One of the youngest or perhaps the youngest, on the memorial is nineteen year old Harold Fisher. He was killed in action on 21 August 1917, whilst serving as a Rifleman with the Rifle Brigade (13th battalion). His parents; Mary Jane and Frederick Ernest Fisher lived at 17 Victoria Street, Haverton Hill.

    Like

    • Harry and Emma Davies, 5 Cowpen Street, Port Clarence lost their son, George Davies aged 18. George must have been one of Kitcheners early volunteers, he died 31 July 1915. At the time he was a private/signaller with the Durham Light Infantry (10th Battalion).

      Like

      • Perhaps like many others during the Great War,George Davies` military career was a tragically brief one.The 10th Battalion Durham Light infantry arrived in France from Aldershot on 21 May 1915.By 30 July 1915 they had been moved forward to Ypres.During the following two nights and a day the Tenth lost 170 men to the German bombardments and sniper fire.George Davies was one of these men.He is buried in Sanctuary Wood Cemetery,near the town of Leper in Belgium.

        Like

  86. So sad. We should never forget the terrible loses between 1914-18 and the families that went through only god knows, the weeping and sorrow sweeping the lands was on biblical proportions. I never got to meet my grandad Robert Casey he died 1939 and was very badly wounded on the 1st July 1916 battle of the Somme. His best mate was Patrick Sullivan, both lads joined the Kings Own Scottish Borders at the same time. Pat Sullivan never came home, he was killed some time after his best mate had left the battlefield badly wounded. What a loss to the world all these young men who knows what they would have gone on to be.

    Like

  87. Another family to lose two sons in the Great War were the Loughran`s of 37 New Cottages, Port Clarence. Thomas Loughran, a private in the Durham Light Infantry was killed in action on 1st July 1916 in France and Flanders (aged 26). His brother, John Patrick Loughran died four months later, killed in action on 3rd November 1916 in France and Flanders. John Patrick was a private in the Machine Gun Corps (aged 21). I don`t know if their father Thomas Loughran had other family to comfort him when the telegrams arrived. Sadly he had already lost his wife Ann Jane Loughran.

    Like

    • Thomas and John Patrick Loughran were killed during the Battle Of The Somme. There names are recorded on the Thiepval Memorial, along with over 72,000 men who died during the battle and have no known grave.

      Like

  88. William and Margaret Tulip, of 4 Temperance Street, Haverton Hill, sadly lost two sons in the Great War. Stephen Tulip was a private in the East Yorkshire Regiment. He was killed in action on 4 June 1916 in France and Flanders, age34. His brother Joseph Tulip was a sergeant in the Machine Gun Corps. He was killed in action on 22 April 1918 in Palestine, age 37.

    Like

    • These are my husband’s distant relatives. Thank you for the address of their parents. I have a photo of the grave of Stephen in France.

      Like

      • I`m glad the information has been of some use to you Linda, the following snippets may also be of some interest. As you will already know Stephen Tulip is buried in the Norfolk cemetery, Bercordel-Bercourt. His brother Joseph Tulip is buried in the Cairo War Memorial Cemetery. Cairo was used as a hospital area for allied troops serving in the middle east. I believe Joseph Tulip was formerly with the Durham Light Infantry prior to the outbreak of war. It`s pleasing that even though it is nearly one hundred years since these brothers were buried, in separate parts of the world, they still have ancestors who can keep alive their memory.

        Like

  89. The memorial contains 94 surnames for the Great War 1914-1919 and 46 surnames from the Second World War.Among the Great war names is the Reverend Matthews Forster Burdess,who had been the rector of St.Thomas`,Port Clarence.Born in Sunderland he was the son of George & Rachel Ann Burdess.He was killed in action on 18 April 1917,aged 39.At this time he was part of the Royal Army Chaplains Department (attached to the 1/6th Gloucester Regiment).

    Like

    • I must apologies for some errors in my information. It is Reverend Matthew Forster Burdess (not Matthews) and the regiment he was attatched to is the 1/6th Gloucestershire Regiment (not Gloucester). After further research I`ve discovered he is buried in the Villers-Faucon Communal Cemetery, near Peronne in the Somme area of France. In April 1917 the 1/6th Gloucestershire regiment were part of the 144th Brigade, 48th(South Midland) Division. They had occupied Peronne during the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line.

      Like

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.