28 thoughts on “Aerial view of Fairfield Junior School

  1. Miss Atkinson! I remember you well, you bravely lead the Young Ornithologists Club and used to give up your weekends to take us bird watching to Seal Sands and beyond. I was in your class in around 1967/68 (I was in year 4 in 1969 but I think there was a spell where we had mixed year groups at one stage) I dearly remember Mr Nicholson and would love to know what happened to the music he wrote for us (especially ‘A baby lay sleeping in Bethlehem town’- I can only remember the first verse!) Happy Days!

    Like

  2. I attended Fairfield junior school from September 1959 to July 1966 . Fond memories of teachers like Mrs Granville, Miss Inman and Mr Amos with whom I shared my birthday. Also fond memories of the temporary wooden classroom built in 1964 and lasted over 40 years and lastly but not least Jaqueline Ray who I Alan Cook used to sit next to in the 4th year

    Like

  3. A few people have mentioned Mr.Carr & his pal ‘Ginger’. To those not in the know, Ginger was ‘The Stick’.
    In my last year at Newtown 1959, Mr Carr was my teacher. On my 11th birthday I got ‘the stick’ for some infringement the previous day. I made sure I never got it again, my hand really stung, some relief was forthcoming by grasping hold of the cold steel tubular frame on the desk/chair unit. On the whole Mr Carr was a popular and good teacher, respected by most of his class, me included.

    Like

  4. So nice to see so many comments from people about my dad (George Gardner) and his time at Tilery School in the 50s. Also to see comments about my late godfather Mr Plummer (Bill) and a former neighbour, Mrs Pritchard. I came to Scarborough to do my teacher training in ’83, George died just before my finals in ’87, and have been in this area ever since. None of my three older brothers, all former pupils of Fairfield and Grangefield, live in the area, so haven’t been back to Stockton in years. Fairfield was a good school – four houses, Gloucester, Kent, Windsor and York, prefects, sports day, Friday morning entertainments, school plays & the annual staff pantomime. Every December I would suddenly get loads of new ‘friends’, simply because they thought I’d tell them what the panto was going to be that year! Mr Carr was a strict but fair head, with the threat of ‘Ginger’!! Great times…

    Like

  5. I was attending Richard Hind when Mr Carling (Pop)returned to teaching. He took our class for Music and English and all the boys took to him straight away. When we had a double English class we always managed to get him to tell us about his life in the Army and I seem to remember him telling the class that he was in the 51st Nothumberland Fusaliers who lost most a lot of men on the first day of the landing’s in France. He said that he got his injury that day and didn’t see any more of the war till he got back to Richard Hind and started to teach 2b English.

    Like

  6. I too would like to say that I enjoyed being taught Religious Knowledge by Ken Sawyer. I think he was one of the few teachers whose Christian name was known to the boys at Richard Hind. All the rest were given nicknames, Smiler Gibson, Pa Dee, Eggy Plummer and Pop Carlin, or referred to as Mr ….. But Ken’s own history was quite similar to many male teachers in the immediate post war era. Many of the them has served in the Forces and had seen something of the world. Pop Carlin (English) had lost part of his foot while fighting in the Middle East and Mr Dee (Chemistry) had been at the front during the First World War, and was about the only survivor of his sixth form. At my primary school in Portrack, our head teacher, Mr Johns, had been out in India, and amazed us with the fact that the Indians ate rice with meat, and that in Italy olive oil was used for cooking. So teachers like this knew how to exert discipline without the need to punish people.

    Like

  7. I am grateful to Ged Hutchinson for his gracious tribute to my teaching work at Richard Hind. Yes we both started at Richard Hind on the same day the difference being that I was paid for it! £360 a year lingers in my mind as my starting salary in 1948 when I taught at Tilery Road for 2 and a half terms. I think that there was a period of 10 weeks in which I was being paid by the education authority and as a sergeant in the army. Vaguely remember it was some special kind of release as they needed the teachers. A bit like a footballer going on loan and then the loan made permanent.
    After we moved on our marriage to Rugby (10 years) and then to Halifax (ever since although my wife’s family were Halifaxians) it was always interesting to observe schools like Fairfield Junior School sprouting on the perimeters of Stockton.
    I never did know what plans were afoot for developing new schools before the onset of WWII brought all such development to a stop.
    Anyone know? Perhaps it was intended even then to build such new primary schools in addition to the secondary schools. Was Stockton Sec/Grangefield Grammar the only school building project to be brought to a halt?

    Like

  8. Presuming that the Mr Hazleton Frank Bowron refers to is Rex Hazelton his presence as a young teacher illustrates what I wrote previously.
    I grew up with Rex in my earlier years as he lived down Spennithorne Road when we were at Aysgarth Road. Rex ‘graduated’ from Richard Hind to Stockton Sec’ & then went as a simmilar age to 6th formers to St John’s College, York for 1945-47. Then into one of the services & on demob into his first teaching post.
    So the men teachers of the period were those like Pop Corner who had trained pre WWII, young men trained before they went into the services and the men who trained on the emergency training schemes (1 year) as they came out of the services.

    Like

  9. I STARTED TILERY IN 1945 AND LEFT TO GO TO FREDDY NATT JAN 1950. I REMEMBER BEING TAUGHT BY MR SAWYER, MR PLUMMER(EGGY), MR CRINSON(POP,) MR NICHOL AND MR GARDENER WHOSE NICKNAME WAS PC 49. HE WAS VERY TALL AND AT THE TIME A RADIO SERIES WAS ABOUT PC 49 HENCE HIS NICKNAME AND MR GRIFFITHS(PIGGY) HEADMASTER. NOT FORGETTING THE FEARSOME MR WEARMOUTH(POP).I REMEMBER MISS BARR(POLLY) AS HEAD OF THE INFANTS. SHE LIVED ON OR AROUND THE NORTON GREEN AREA. IT’S GREAT TO SEE SO MANY NAMES FROM THE PAST.

    Like

  10. I attended Tilery Rd infants & junior girls school from 1945 till 51. I can’t remember any male teachers in the girls school but we had some excellent female teachers. Miss Guy in particular took the scholarship class & got many of us so called under privileged kids into Grangefield & Richard Hind. I believe she later became head of Oxbridge Lane school. Most female teachers in those days never married & seemed to concentrate all their efforts into teaching!

    Like

  11. Ken’s comment about the shortages of male teachers is interesting. At Norton Board school in the early fifties we had ‘Pop’ Corner as Head of the Junior School with two Mssrs Thompson and Mr Hazleton, the rest of the teachers as far as I recall were women. The infant school was staffed entirely by women teachers. At Stockton Grammar all the teachers were men, though we once had a trainee woman French teacher for one term. (We nick-named her ‘Fifi’ but I don’t recall her real name.) Our A-stream Infant/Junior class had 52 children! – 19 boys and 33 girls – and there were four streams in our year and the following two years. We are referred to today as the Boomer generation, but back then were known as the post-war ‘Baby Bulge’. Ken is so right when he says that facilities were limited, many of our classrooms were recycled army huts, but the teachers and their improvisations were excellent. They wouldn’t get away with it today with the tightly controlled National Curriculum and Key stages, but teaching in those overcrowded, run-down Victorian edifices and old army huts, their methods served their purpose. My fondest memories are of Miss Cousins, ‘Thombuck’ Thompson and at SGS, Frank ‘Blossom’ Cain, who apart from being Headmaster, was possibly one of the best Mathematics teachers of his generation.

    Like

  12. Like Ken Sawyer I also started school at Richard Hind in September 1949. I realise now how young he was to be our teacher but nobody thought that at the time. I remember Ken Sawyer as a fine teacher. He took our class for Religeous Knowledge though I know that he taught other subjects to other pupils. He will always be remembered by pupils at Richard Hind for his sterling work in developing the highly sucessful sporting side of the school`s achievements. He was particularly active with the school`s cricket, football and athletic teams. I am so pleased to see that he is still active and showing an interest in the Stockton schools despite no longer living in the area. Pupils of that first year that he taught at Richard Hind will all be in their seventies and I`m sure that those of us that are still around will remember Ken Sawyer with great fondness.

    Like

  13. This post is in two parts first Brian Bennison I loved the sentiment about a richness of spirit and agree with it wholeheartedly. On top of that the final comment regarding the generosity of the society/ neighbours, in general – we were very lucky. There were times when as youngsters we were not very happy about the people interfering with our fun BUT they would look out for you and keep you safe. Ken Sawyer I remember your name, never got taught by you – what year were you there? I think I left in 1958/ 1959 [a victim of my birth date] and went to Grangefield. I met George again at my thirtieth birthday bash. He was a friend of Mrs Pritchard. Her son ‘Roz’ who was at grammar school with me ended up teaching at the new Tilery school at St Anne’s hill. To both of you plus the Picture Stockton team, this is a fine web site BUT what else could I expect from the town I was brought up in?

    Like

  14. Although I was never taught by him, I do remember a Mr Gardner at Tilery Road Boys during my time there, 1955-59. He prepared a class for the 11 plus and had quite a few successes if my memory serves right. The teachers I do remember, having been taught by them, were Mr Cornforth, (woodwork), George Kennedy (Science), Bob Smales and Mr Jones, class teachers who taught everything else.

    Like

  15. There are some very good & wise contributions here. Brian Bennison is absolutely correct about the richness of spirit. George Gardner was a colleague of mine at Tilery Road for 9 months.
    Almost all of my teaching career was in secondary education. I started teaching at Richard Hind Secondary Technical (ex Central) Boys’ School in September 1949 but my spell at Tilery Road followed on demob from the Army. I was suddenly available to the education authority and Mr Griffiths had an urgent vacancy for a class of 9 year olds. Even then I was quite young.
    The slaughter of WW1 left the schools of England & the rest of the UK desperately short of qualified men teachers. When another war was imminenet plans were made to build up a stock of qualified men. So in 1944 I went off to Teacher Training College, along with 2 others from my year group at Stockton Grammar. We were only 17-18, the age of 6th formers, and were exempt from call up until we qualified 2 years later. Even during my college holiday in 1945 I taught full time. A class of 40 or so boys of Bowesfield Lane School but in a Methodist Church schoolroom on Yarm Road. So we got good experience!
    Certainly there was an excellence of spirit in what were then all age schools in the Stockton area. It was only post war & the Butler Act of 1944 that these schools became purely Infant & Junior Schools & more Secondary schools were built to add to schools such as Newham Grange.
    Although I followed the school route of 2 years at Newtown, then on to Trinity & as a scholarship boy (rewarded with a bike!) to the Grammar. At the same time I could respect the fine mood of school such as Oxbridge Lane.
    Facilities in many of those schools were very limited but improvisation by teachers was of high quality.

    Like

  16. Mike Renwick is correct about the quality of primary education in the poorer areas of the town in the 1950s. This may have had something to do with teachers being permitted to devote their time to teaching, unencumbered by bureaucracy, and we pupils anticipating getting a lot of our pleasure and inspiration from school at a time when there was a limited number of other distractions. I would not want to become infected by incipient nostalgia, but I do think that in those relative austere times there existed a richness of spirit which was as valuable as material wealth. One of the sadnesses, of course, is that it is only later that you realise the sacrifices parents made and the generosity relatives, neighbours and teachers showed with their time and help.

    Like

  17. Alison White I have to ask, did your father-in-law teach at the old Tilery Road school in the 1950’s? If so I knew him as a young man, and won’t have to tell you what a splendid teacher he was. He taught the 11 plus class and was enthusiastic in whatever he did. On top of school work he taught me how to play chess. I am therefore very sad to learn of his passing, another link to my past gone. Don’t know what it was about the teaching staff there but as a rule they were excellent, and in an establishment, which nowadays would be in what would be classed as a deprived area, we got a very good primary education.

    Like

  18. I was at Fairfield Junior School from 1972-1976. I remember Miss Atkinson – read us The Little House on the Prairie books. She was my class teacher when she got married & became if I remember correctly Mrs Copeland. My late father, George Gardner, was deputy head at the school from the early 70s to 1984. Mr Trimble was my class teacher in years 3 and then in the top juniors as it was then called. Am a primary teacher myself in a small village school just off the A64 near Malton. Sad to hear about Mr Nicholson – he was a good music and singing teacher.

    Like

  19. I taught at Fairfield Junior School from 1966 – 1974 and was Miss Atkinson. The Miss Lee who was mentioned married my brother in 1970. Bill Nicholson, who was very musical, was my best pal and we remained friends. Sadly, he died about four years ago and is very much missed. Does anyone remember going to Switzerland with Miss Lee, Miss Tomkys and I in 1969 or 1970?

    Like

    • Hi. My name was Susan Atkinson (no relation) and I remember you so well, you were a massive Leeds United fan! Such happy memories of this school – Mr Feetham, Mrs Cooper, Mr Nicholson, Mr Trimble and of course Mr Carr.

      Like

  20. Fond memories of Fairfield; left in 80/81; Mr Trimble – funny and relaxed; Mrs Langford – smacked me around the back of the head for not using a ruler; Hazel Wilston – who I was in love with; the pebbles stuck in the concrete where my lego spacemen practised moon landings. I’m a teacher now myself, in New Zealand: more like Mr Timble than Mrs Langford, two kids and a happy marriage. I still wonder where Hazel ended up though.

    Like

  21. I left Fairfield Junior School in 1981 when my family emigrated to Australia. The things I remember are school dinners, as my mum was a Dinner Lady and I had to eat them. School house points. My children think I went to Hogwarts because the uniform is so different to school uniforms in Australia. I also remember some of my teachers, Mrs Smails, Mr Russell and my Yr 1 teacher. Playing on the field in winter, country dancing, harvest festival and trying to carry home all the donation boxes, easter and christmas parties were great fun. I still have the card signed by the class when I left and the figurine given to me as a farewell gift. Oh, I had almost forgotten about conkers and slipping on the black ice!!

    Like

    • Mrs Glanville was the reception teacher. The head of infants was Miss Allan. Mrs Cree was a teacher in the infants. In the juniors I remember the head Mr Carr, Mrs Askew, Mrs Brewster (or maybe she was infants?) Mr Trimble, Miss Atkinson, Mr Arnison and the wonderful Mr Nicholson who has inspired me to lead children’s choirs to this day.

      Like

  22. I went to Fairfield Infant And Junior School from 1961-1968. The Teachers I remember are Mr Arnison, Mrs Thomas, Mr Trimble and of course, Mr Carr. Mrs Cree was I think a teacher in the infants, but my be wrong. I recall a Miss/Mrs Allan being head of the infants. Other pupils in my class were Judith Bowen, Jacqui Cavanagh, Leigh Gordon, Jayne Crisp, Tim Race, Elaine Snowdon, Denise Thompson, judith Dack, Steven Lumb, Janice Brown and Kevin Thompson.

    Like

  23. I was at Fairfield Infants and Juniors during the same period as Mark. Teachers names? Infants Head was Mrs Gladstone? Then there was Mrs Brewster, Miss Trowbridge and Miss Lee who became Mrs Atkinson. Juniors Head Mr Carr – Had a Blue Austin Maxi Mr Arnison, – Had a Hillman Imp Mr Gardener Mrs Abbott Miss Atkinson Mr Nicholson – had a Green Austin Mini B reg Remember seeing the fire at the Dutch barn across the road. Also Mr Carr and his “Ginger” cane.

    Like

  24. I attended Fairfield Infants School (1963 or 1964-5) then Faifield Junior School (until 1969), which was actually called Fairfield County Junior Mixed School. The Infants was the building in the middle far right of the picture. The building to the bottom far right is Wellburn House, a nursing home for the elderly. The Police Houses were at the bottom far left where part of the road can be seen. My strongest memories of the school were watching the moon landing – thanks to Miss Ruddock. Teachers I also remember were Mr. Nicholson, and the Headmaster, William Carr, who Steve Jones and I were terrified of!

    Like

Leave a comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.