37 thoughts on “Redmarshall Parish Church

  1. I remember Robert Thompson at Redmarshall School, and also the name Battersby but not sure which of the children was around my age. I was born 1952 and started school after Easter 1957 before my 5th birthday. I also remember there were older boys called Turnbull and Trotter at Grangefield when I was there – Phil Trotter was head boy arround 1963-4.

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    • I was born in 1932, went to Redmarshall school in 1940 for a short time. My brother Owen was born in 1942 and went to Grangefield School when 11

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  2. I went to Redmarshall School from 1957-61, after which I attended Holy Trinity in Stockton. I remember a Battersby but not his first name. I also remember Kathleen Pinkney, Janet Claxton, and the Clark family who had a farm on the way to Whitton – Raymond and Ann in particular. The Deboo family lived in a caravan near the church – children were Jane and David. There were also two brothers named Keith and Ian, possibly Wilkinson? From Carlton I knew Margaret and Ann Purcifer and Jill Horner, also Thomas Andrew. The Fishburns lived on on Thorpe Road like me, along with the Pease family including Michael and the Pattersons including Alan. One of our dinner ladies Mrs Simpson also lived there.

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  3. My brother and I went to Redmarshall School around 1960. It only had two classrooms, one for infants and the other for juniors. Mrs Young was the infants teacher and could be a tad tetchy! I remember playing cricket in the playground in PE. Another memory was catching the old bus to get to and from school (we lived in Letch Lane, Carlton) it was all countryside then. We moved shortly before the school was knocked down. Does anyone have any photographs of it please?

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  4. Does anybody remember when Carlton village had a junior cricket team in the fifties, they played in the field opposite to the church at the crossroads to Stillington, the Tate brothers & David Lewis were in this team they later played for Norton Cricket Club. Carlton House was the residence of the farm you refer to Ralph.

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  5. The Robert Thompson I knew lived on the farm on the left just beyond the Smiths Arms going towards Redmarshall. Phil Tingle lived at the Garage a little further on the right.

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  6. I lived in Carlton until 1953. I played cricket with Robert Thompson and Phil Tingle. We lived next door to the Horners next to the Smiths Arms.

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  7. I grew up in Carlton in the 7O”s and 80″s, my mother still lives in Green Leas. I will always remember the Church garden parties in the grounds of the Ship Inn and the wonderful community spirit. I was married and confirmed at St.Cuthberts and had special dispensation from the Bishop to have my son christened there and not at my local church, I watched the viaduct at Thorp Thewles being demolished from the Chruch Tower. The Battersbys house was a delight and it was here I learnt to sing and play Amazing Grace with Mrs Battersby, a true lady. Gosh so many memories of a wonderful place to grow up. Having travelled and done various jobs I now work at Darchem in Stillington, small worlds!

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  8. Hello all,I am Malcolm Battersby formerly of 16 Church Lane[The one on the Church side of the Ship]. I lived there from 1957 until the late 70″s when my father Arthur Battersby passed away.My mother Betty had to sell the house and moved to Thorpe Thewels where she lived until her death in “97.My brother Prof. Paul Battersby lives and lectures in Melbourne Australia and I live and write music in Tasmania. Does anyone remember us? I had the best childhood running the fields and trudging down to Whitton Beck to try for that Trout.The old school was a bit strict and I remember it closing down and we all were shipped to the new Bishopton School.

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    • Hello Malcolm
      I have a Dorothy Battersby age 4 staying with Thomas Harrison and wife Ann on a farm in Redmarshall 1841/1851 and there is a John Trotter b York also staying there. Thomas and Ann had approx. 6 children Jane, John, Thomas, Elizabeth, Rob and Emma. Any info on these 3 surnames would be great

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    • Hi Malcolm, I remember Redmarshall school and your house. It’s nice to see you are still into your music. Your old friend Keith Wright.

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    • I can remember Arthur and Betty. I believe that Arthur was local councillor. Betty was always very well dressed. I was born in Carlton in 1932 in the house near the chapel now called Fairfield Lodge. It was called Cornerways when my father had it built in preparation for his wedding in 1930.

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  9. My Brother in Law Norman Trotter was born in the Carlton Pub when they had the Blacksmiths on the premises, his grand parents where the Pinkneys. Norman is now in his eighties and lives in Hartburn with his wife Della (Nee Kennedy) a Stillington girl who were married in the Church in Stillington.

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  10. The Smiths arms at Carlton has been mentioned several times. Does anyone remember when it was the village Smithy.We watched horses being shod.Family surnames in the village at this time would have been THOMPSON BATTERSBY HORNER TINKLER HALL TURNBULL BOISTON PATTERSON PINKNEY WILSON.There was a Weslyan Chapel at the top of the village .SCURRS buses connected Stillington Redmarshall Carlton & Stockton. Miss Remmington was head mistress at Redmarshall C of E school and the church was run by Rev Rust. Does anyone rember this period (1932-1939). DAVID BOISTON.

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    • My grandparents Frederick and Florence Turnbull lived in White House, opposite the Smiths arms. At the outbreak of war when I was 7,my parents, Harley and Mary Turnbull, my sister Audrey, and I moved in with grandparents. We had been living in Redcar, and there was a fear of invasion. Harley led the Home Guard, Mary the red cross. I attended Redmarshall School for some of the time, then went to Sedgefield school, travelling by bus from Thorpe. Peter King ran the scouts,

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      • I also lived at White House and am Ian’s brother having been born in 1942 whilst living in Newby Terrace (now Bishopton Road) Stockton. I went to Carlton with my parents in 1958/9 after the death of grandmother Florence Annie Turnbull and to care for Frederick William….who was with us until1966. Phil Tingle passed his driving test on his 17th birthday having practised well beforehand! I well remember “Fingers Farrelly” as the landlord called himself when activating his till! Apart from a spell at university I lived at White House until 1969. My sister Audrey with (then) husband Wilf and 2 toddlers lived there with us for a few months prior to their emigration to USA in about 1963… guessing

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          • Said it’s me before I read the rest of your posting Alan. Of course I remember you…. a centre like me. I believe you were in Cleveland house at Grangefield? After Uni I worked in Stockton until ’68 then a year in Nigeria where I “bumped into” a Scots lass, Jenni, who was visiting her dad out there. Fate dealt the blow as our paths crossed in London when both there Xmas/New year 68/69 and we married in Prestwick August ’69. Now living in Pickering whilst sons and their families are not so far away in Leeds. How the years roll by! Best wishes

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        • Are you the Owen Turnbull who played rugby at Stockton rugby club and Grangefield Grammar School?
          If so you may remember me. I married Barbara Taylor who lived for a while in the Carlton Post Office/shop with her parents and brother Trevor.
          Barbara and I were married in the church at Redmarshall. We left for a short Honeymoon in Leeds and Nottingham and then onto Croydon where I was working for Power Gas on the commissioning of a Gas Reformer Plant.
          Sadly Barbara died in October 2018 in Whitehaven Hospital where she had worked until she retired.
          Her brother Trevor and his wife Alice are living in France close to their daughter Eve and Alice’s daughter Melanie and their respective children.

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    • I remember the village smithy attached to the Smiths Arms, but don’t know when it was used for that purpose. I do know it was used as the meeting place for the Home Guard during the war, when my father was in charge of it. I went to Redmarshall school from 1940 for about 3 years. Mrs Remington was indeed the head teacher, and Miss Bainbridge the deputy. 2 classrooms with partition between, a coal fire in each room, toilets in the yard, and an air raid shelter across the road to which we went to sing ‘there’ll always be an England”. etc. Edward Rust was the Vicar and his spinster sister (who pronounced ‘s’ as ‘sh’ ) lived with him. Mr Rust always mounted his bike from the rear somehow. He visited my great-grandmother on her 90th birthday while we all sat round the tea tea table. He had a drip on his nose when he arrived, and didn’t have one when he left! We were not sure which cakes we could eat!!

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  11. my great great grandad george skelton from malton yorks moved to carlton redmarshal c 1865 with his wife margaret and their chidren thomas,francis,elizabeth and david my greta grandad was born there in 1872. wonder if there are any skelton vickers wilson families left there.

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  12. Hello Fred Webster; You mentioned Peter and Ruth of The Smiths Arms, The Farellys. I knew them well. My younger brother Paul married their daughter Sue. They live in Shropshire now, have two beautiful adult daughters, Ami and Sophie. Sadly Ruth passed away in 06. When visiting from Canada we used to stay with Ruth in Carlton in the late 90s and early 2000s. A Lovely ,smart lady . Peter, I only knew in the 60s,he passed away quite a few years ago, he was a great character, of course, he was “Mentioned in Dispatches” during the war. Small world Eh !

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  13. Hi Fred, I drank in the Smiths at Carlton on Saturday nights. Didn”t go down there with guys from the village, was very much into entertaining girls back then! I wonder what happened to Roy from the Ship? He seemed to be a good bloke.

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  14. I remember the Ship can anyone remember the old lady that had the pub in the early to mid 60’s before Roy, she often was a bit strange and never had many customers, she would often have a “Raffle“ when there were on about 6 people in the pub and nearly all got a prize usually a bottle of whisky several other bottles, cigarettes and sweets, she must have run it at a loss

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  15. Small world David, I lived 8 Rydal Way from 71 when they were built untill 1980 and the “Ship” was then of course a free house with Roy Matthews at the “helm”, a group of us from the village would walk down to the “Smiths” in Carlton each Monday, sorry I dont recall all but were you one of that group,with Peter and Ruth in the Smiths and Roy in the Ship we were well watered in those days!

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    • Hi, I lived in 7 Rydal Way, from when it was built until I joined Army Nursing Corps in 75, Nancy and Harry Taylor were my Mam and Dad, (both sadly passed). Redmarshall was a great place to live as a teenager. I remember Peter and Ruth from the “Smiths” with great fondness, and kept in touch with Ruth after Peter passed away, Ruth was a great help to me when I was posted to Cyprus. I also remember Malcolm Battersby, he was friends with my brother Paul. What a lovely village.

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  16. I lived in Redmarshall until 1978, No 11, Rydal Way. Loved the village life, however, must admit I spent more time in the Ship Inn than I ever did in the church. If my memory serves me well the Ship was one of the few pubs in Northern England that served Watney”s Red Barrel back then. Mind the less said about that beer the better!!!!

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  17. Redmarshall A continuation A visit to the new Vicarage to the south of the Church saw us in conversation with the Rector of Redmarshal the Rev Tim Ollier and his kind permission to ascend the Tower The staircase ended and we stood amazed at the truly awe inspiring magnificent view, It was very windy but clear as crystal in all directions We were over 200ft ,plus the tower To the west the colours were mainly green getting darker till it was possible to view the darker foot-hills of the Pennines 18-20 miles away The South led into the Vale of York , the curve of the the Cleveland Hills highly visible, with as they became the Hambelton Hills The East was dominated by Tees Valley , Billingham and Wilton steam and smoke marking industry The Transporter also Both Norton and Billingham Church towers were visible The sea though not sighted left a bright almost green straight line reflection in the blue sky line Hartlepool “Oxo-Cube” power-astation showing to the north Agriculture was the picture from the North parapet dark brown harvested fields , two bright green Combine-Harvesters working the yellow corn land The spire of St Edmunds above the trees in Sedgefield A spread of meadow and open fields, with flashes of red pantile from the farms and villages leading into the Anfield Plain of South Durham

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  18. Redmarshall St Cuthbert’s With many farming / family links to Norton, we visited this beautiful Church “The battlemented tower was bathed in autumnal sunshine against a blue cloudless sky, the rough stone work a contrast to St Mary”s in Norton. The main body of the Church with its entrance near the tower and a smaller Priest door to the East, with a curved stone arch on which a 14th smiling carved face, wearing a merchants fur cap The interior is timeless, high soft white walls, to a high arched roof, beautiful leaded stained glass windows throw multi-colours over the floor and walls The wooden “box-pews’ gleamed with hundreds of years of polish, with candle- scones still in place Harvest Festival had recently taken place and harvest bounty and flowers festooned the altar and windows. In the South or Lagton Porch are two carved faces looking across at each other. The east one apparently a master-mason, prideful of his work The west a masons labourer, bearing a block of stone on his head, wearing a caped and buttoned jerkin, held by a leather belt, his lined and work-worn face forever under his bosses gaze The most pleasant and poignant surprise was finding two full-size reclining figures to which a very human touch had been added The figures are of Sir Thomas Langton in armour (Chief Officer and Chamberlain to Percy, Earl of Northumberland) Thomas died 1417 and his wife Lady Sybil Langton, in court dress The human touch? Each had a spray of fresh flowers in their hand and a woven chain of wild flowers joined them together”. As a matter of interest less than 1/4 mile to the west of St Cuthbert’s alongside the Bishopton road is the highly visible remains of a Motte-Bailey Castle built in the 1100s to keep down the Saxon rebels, ,

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