Furness Cup & Windsor Street School

Photo one is of a chap called Bill Bowker holding the Furness cup. I can find no other information other than his name on the back of the photo stating he is holding the Furness Cup.


Photo two simply states Windsor Street School football team. A school I know to be in Haverton Hill but no date, and also no names. Perhaps your wider, more knowledgeable audience may have some answers?

Photo and details courtesy of Neil Cushin.

Joseph Norman Kidd

We’ve had some more sad news sent to us about another much valued contributor to this website. Joseph Norman Kidd passed away on 16th November aged 92 years. Over many years he contributed to the archive with stories of people and events, particularly related to the railway, that he experienced during his time living in Norton-on-Tees.

Our condolences go to his wife Joyce who told us the news and wished us all well in continuing to share people’s memories on Picture Stockton.

Here is a photograph first sent to us in 2007 showing Private J. Norman Kidd, No. 4 Squad, A Company, DLI Army Cadets, with a link to the original post where Norman shared his recollections of his time in the cadets.

https://picturestocktonarchive.com/2007/01/27/no4-squad-a-company-dli-army-cadets/

Granville Cooper

We’ve had some sad news sent to us from Ben Brown about one of our regular contributors, Granville Cooper:

Sadly I wish to report of the death of a well known Teesside Sportsman Granville Cooper who has contributed many articles to this site over the past years.

Gran as we all knew him died aged 86 years after a mammoth battle with leukemia over the last ten years. Gran died in Bristol on Saturday 14th November. He was a one of the longest surviving sufferers of this very debilitating disease.

Gran has posted many articles on this site over the years. He was a top class centre forward playing for Billingham Synthonia and and Whitby Town for many seasons, being top scorer at Whitby Town during his stay there. In later years he played for Head Wrightsons in a very successful Teesside league team. During his National Service in the Royal Air Force he was stationed in Singapore where he won the player of the year award for the top league.

Gran served his apprenticeship at Head Wrightson Stockton Forge as a template maker and graduated to a draughtman position before embarking on a career of Construction Management. Gran was Construction Manager for BP and Foster Wheeler for many of the European major projects in his position as Construction Manager and on several occasions had the prestigious position of introducing the Queen to the top people of many successful projects. At times his staff numbered over 2500 employees. Gran is a shining example of what local talent can achieve with the right sort of attitude to their careers.

He will be sadly missed. RIP Gran Cooper.

Granville Cooper meets the Queen in Cologne , 1992.

Greg Cooper, Granville Cooper’s son, has also sent us these lovely photographs to accompany this post.

 

On the Buses and in Woolworths

My uncle, Jack Bailey, is the conductor shown in this photograph. He was born in 1905 and worked, ”on the buses” from aged 14, when he started as a tram conductor, until his retirement as a bus inspector, as did his older brother Frank and younger brother Billy.

Supervisors from Woolworths in Stockton. My mum, Eileen Southall (nee Bailey) is the lady on the right. This would have been taken in the early 1950s in the Parish Gardens. The ladies’ very smart uniforms were made by my grandmother Lillie Bailey.

Photographs and details courtesy of Jan Hemblade.

King George V Coronation 1911

This “Coronation” picture has me puzzled, does anybody have any idea about what could be happening, there are an awful lot of people, all men, standing around a bus, there are far too many to all get aboard.

Also there are no signs of street decoration that normally accompany such events, the only thing I am sure of is the pickup point was in the high street outside the alleyway leading to the Blue Post Hotel. Judging by the way the men are dressed I would say that 1911 is a very likely date for the picture.

Photograph and details courtesy of Bruce Coleman.

Memories of the Green Howards WWII

The 50th (Northumbrian) Division included the Infantry Brigades 149th, 150th (4th Battalion East Yorkshire Regiment, 4th and 5th Green Howards and 5th Durham Light Infantry) and 151st. The division was mobilised on 1st September 1939 and in October 1939 was under the command of Major-General Giffard Le Quesne Martel, focused on training in the Cotswolds. Then in January 1940 embarked to France to join the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). My father (Pte RL Hymer), in the 4th Green Howards fought in France and retreated to Dunkirk. After which was sent to North Africa and in the Battle of Gazala, Rommel surrounded the 150th Brigade Box known as the Cauldron until it was gradually reduced over a stubborn defence and overrun by noon on 1st June 1942. Prisoners were then taken through Italy to German camps and Stalag XVII B [Pottenbrunn, Austria] is where he was taken. His mother, Margaret Hymer (21 Salisbury Street, Thornaby-on-Tees) sent a parcel to him on the 31st December 1944, rather than the Red Cross. Home from the battlefields, the Green Howards honoured with the freedom of Middlesbrough – 1946.

Photographs and details courtesy of Michael Hymer.

Reflection on Pickering Lifts, 1971

The introduction to engineering draughting after a selection process started at Pickerings Lifts in 1971.

Two apprentices for the drawing office were taken on that year, where I participated with memorable moments in a professional career. The first year of my apprenticeship was an initiation to drawing office procedures of drawing and documentation. Manufacturing courses in the second year were at the Engineering Industry Training Board in Billingham. Unfortunately, I was instructed to try harder as the time went on. A project of manufacturing a set of gauge of guides for Pickerings Lifts did not meet the required standard, sadly I accepted the verdict from my apprentice partner from Pickerings. At least I managed to attain the EITB certification. We went on to Stockton & Billingham College for the engineering qualifications. There is abundance of admiration I hold dear to the staff at Pickerings Lifts. (In the photograph, that is me in the middle).

My reflection on life in my career and ancestry started in 2010 when I was diagnosed with cancer. Two surgical operations later (left & right dissections; partial tongue removal), 60 treatments of radiotherapy and 6 regimes of chemotherapy, hope the coronavirus does not get me. Still my wife who I met at Pickerings Lifts looks after me and me to her.

Images and details courtesy of Michael Hymer.

Billingham South Modern Staff c1951

I started school (Billingham Intermediate School) in September 1942. There were three intake and leaving times in the school year. The new school term started in the Autumn, any child who reached their fifth birthday before the end of the term started school during that term. The Winter term started after the Christmas holidays and continued until the Easter Holidays, the last term ran from the end of the Easter Holidays until the start of the long Summer holidays. I don’t remember anything of my first day at school but I do know my teacher was a Miss Keep, she was still there as headmistress when my eldest son started at the school in September 1968.

The children came from a very large area, even as far as Trimdon, Greatham and Sedgefield, they came by normal service buses and when they got off at the Green they had to race to get to school on time, this worked fine in the warmer weather but in the Winter it was not unusual to have them arrive as late as 10:30, these children were allowed to leave an hour earlier than the local children so they could catch their buses and get home safely.

Another thing that comes to mind is the whole class walking to the Green area and having our lunch in the British Civic Restaurant, which was next to the Methodist Central Hall, why we did this I don’t know as there were school dinners available within the school, I do remember having my dinner in the school whilst sitting at my desk, once again I don’t know why. We spent time (girls only) in ‘The Flat’ in the school to learn cooking and ‘Washing’, we had to take a handkerchief and a sock and we were taught how to wash and iron them, to this day I can still remember how to iron a sock but have never done it since leaving school.We also cooked a main meal and invited our favourite teachers to share it with us. – Freda McCorkell, nee Leek

I too was at the South Modern from September 1957 until July 1958 before moving the new Stephenson Hall school on the Billingham Campus site.Mr Martindale (Head), Mr Laws, Miss Dent, Miss Wood, Miss Fletcher, Mr Cowperthwaite and Mr Wilkinson were still teaching while I was there, the latter three came to the Campus when we went there.I mentioned to my aunt that Miss Fletcher, the art mistress, had a wonderful way of sorting the wheat from the chaff, our first lesson with her we were asked to draw a person and a house, she took one look at my effort and that was it, she never spoke to me or any other of the no hopers for the rest of our time at school, our weekly art lesson was a double period of sitting in silence while leafing through back issues of
Country Life, my aunt suffered the same fate but without the benefit of the Country Life magazine, admittedly those with artistic talents were encouraged all the way.My late friend Brian Storey thought the un-named teacher was a Mr Milburn. – Bruce Coleman

I have posted this on behalf of my aunt, Freda McCorkell, nee Leek. Courtesy of Bruce Coleman.

Can anyone identify this Stockton Mayor?

A genealogist suggested to me that the chain my ancestor is wearing looks to be “of the Mayor of Stockton”. My father was born in Acklam, Middlesbrough and I know that some of our ancestors came from the Stockton area. My father left Yorkshire for New Zealand in 1925 so I’m assuming he brought the photo with him. It looks like an official portrait photo. Any help in identifying this person would be much appreciated.

Photograph and details courtesy of David Sickling.